Chapter ppt 15 - copy

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Chapter ppt 15 - copy

  1. 1. ConsumerDecision Makingand BeyondCHAPTERFIFTEEN
  2. 2. Levels of Consumer Decision Making• Extensive Problem Solving– A lot of information needed– Must establish a set of criteria for evaluation• Limited Problem Solving– Criteria for evaluation established– Fine tuning with additional information• Routinized Response Behavior– Usually review what they already know2Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  3. 3. Models of Consumers: Four Views of ConsumerDecision Making• An Economic View• A Passive View• A Cognitive View• An Emotional View3Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  4. 4. ConsumerDecision MakingFigure 15.34Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  5. 5. Process - Need Recognition• Usually occurs when consumer has a“problem”• Need recognition styles– Actual state– Desired stateCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5Chapter Fifteen Slide
  6. 6. Prepurchase Search• Begins with internal search and then moves toexternal search• The impact of the Internet• There are many factors that increase search– Product factor– Situational factors– Social acceptability– Consumer factors6Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  7. 7. Evaluation of Alternatives• Evoked set• Criteria used for evaluating brands• Consumer decision rules• Decisions by functionally illiterate population• Going online for decision-making assistance• Lifestyles as a consumer decision strategy• Incomplete information• Applying decision rules• Series of decisions• Decision rules and marketing strategy7Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  8. 8. The Evoked SetFigure 15-58Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  9. 9. Issues in Alternative Evaluation• Evoked Set• Criteria used for evaluating brands• Consumer decision rules and their application• Decisions by functionally illiterate population• Going online for decision-making assistance• Lifestyles as a consumer decision strategy• Incomplete information• Applying Decision Rules• Series of decisions• Decision rules and marketing strategy9Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  10. 10. Consumer Decision Rules• Compensatory– evaluates each brand in terms of each relevantattribute and then selects the brand with thehighest weighted score.• Noncompensatory– positive evaluation of a brand attribute does notcompensate for a negative evaluation of the samebrand on some other attribute10Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  11. 11. Issues in Alternative Evaluation• Evoked Set• Criteria used for evaluating brands• Consumer decision rules and their application• Decisions by functionally illiterate population• Going online for decision-making assistance• Lifestyles as a consumer decision strategy• Incomplete information• Applying Decision Rules• Series of decisions• Decision rules and marketing strategy11Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  12. 12. Issues in Alternative Evaluation• Evoked Set• Criteria used for evaluating brands• Consumer decision rules and their application• Decisions by functionally illiterate population• Going online for decision-making assistance• Lifestyles as a consumer decision strategy• Incomplete information• Applying Decision Rules• Series of decisions• Decision rules and marketing strategy12Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  13. 13. Coping with Missing Information• Delay decision until missing information isobtained• Ignore missing information and use availableinformation• Change the decision strategy to one thatbetter accommodates for the missinginformation• Infer the missing information13Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  14. 14. Issues in Alternative Evaluation• Evoked set• Criteria used for evaluating brands• Consumer decision rules and their application• Decisions by functionally illiterate population• Going online for decision making assistance• Lifestyles as a consumer decision strategy• Incomplete information• Applying Decision Rules• Series of decisions• Decision rules and marketing strategy14Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  15. 15. Output of Consumer Decision Making• Purchase behavior– Trial purchases– Repeat purchases– Long-term commitment• Postpurchaseevaluation15Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  16. 16. Postpurchase Evaluation• Actual Performance Matches Expectations– Neutral Feeling• Actual Performance Exceeds Expectations– Positive Disconfirmation of Expectations• Performance Is Below Expectations– Negative Disconfirmation of Expectations• Post-Purchase Cognitive Dissonance16Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  17. 17. Gifting BehaviorGifting is an act ofsymboliccommunication, withexplicit and implicitmeanings ranging fromcongratulations andlove, to regret,obligation, anddominance.17Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  18. 18. CIRCUMSTANCESPersonal accomplishmentFeeling downHolidayFeeling stressedHave some extra moneyNeedHad not bought for self in a whileAttainment of a desired goalOthersMOTIVATIONSTo reward oneselfTo be nice to oneselfTo cheer up oneselfTo fulfill a needTo celebrateTo relieve stressTo maintain a good feelingTo provide an incentive toward a goalOthersReported Circumstances and Motivationsfor Self-Gift BehaviorTable 15.1318Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  19. 19. Consuming and Possessing• Consumers find pleasure in possessing,collecting, or consuming• Products have special meanings andmemories1919Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  20. 20. A Model of ConsumptionFigure 15.1120Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide
  21. 21. RelationshipMarketingMarketing aimed atcreating strong,lasting relationshipswith a core group ofcustomers by makingthem feel good aboutthe company and bygiving them somekind of personalconnection with thebusiness.21Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Fifteen Slide

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