Chapter ppt 09 - copy-1

254 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
254
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter ppt 09 - copy-1

  1. 1. Communication andConsumer BehaviorCHAPTERNINE
  2. 2. Basic Communication ModelFigure 9.22Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  3. 3. The Source as the Initiator33Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  4. 4. The Source -Impersonal and Interpersonal Communications• Source Credibility• Reference Groups– Normative– Comparative– Membership– Symbolic44Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  5. 5. • Informal Sources– Opinion leaders• Word of Mouth andeWOM– Two-way communication– Social networks– Brand communities– Message boards andBlogs5The SourceInformal Sources and Word of Mouth5Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  6. 6. • Buzz Agents• Viral Marketing• Tackling negative rumors6The SourceWord of Mouth – Strategic Applications6Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  7. 7. • Institutionaladvertising• Publicity• Endorsers7The SourceCredibility of Formal Sources7Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  8. 8. Discussion Questions• Who do you consider to be a crediblespokesperson(s)?• Why?• Can you think of certain ads with crediblespokespeople?• Ads with spokespeople who are NOT credible?8Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  9. 9. Credibility of Formal SourcesEndorser Effectiveness99Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  10. 10. 10Credibility of Formal SourcesOther Credibility Sources10Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  11. 11. The Receivers as the Target Audience• Personal characteristics and motives• Involvement and congruency• Mood• Barriers to communication– Selective exposure to messages– Psychological noise11Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  12. 12. Overcoming Psychological Noise1212Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  13. 13. Media (Channel)• Mass Media• Nontraditional (New) Media is:1313Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  14. 14. The Shift From TraditionalTo Nontraditional Advertising Is Growing - Figure 9.51414Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  15. 15. Nontraditional Media• Out-of-home and On-the-go– Advertising screens in buildings and transit– Digital billboards on roads– Ambient advertising (in new places)• Online and Mobile– Includes consumer-generated media– Narrowcast messages• Interactive TV (iTV)1515Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  16. 16. Designing Persuasive Communications• Resonance• Message framing• One-Sided versus Two-Sided Messages• Order Effects• Wordplay• Used to create a doublemeaning when usedwith a relevant pictureMessage Structureand Presentation16Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  17. 17. Ads That Show Resonance1717Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  18. 18. Designing Persuasive Communications• Resonance• Message framing• One-Sided versus Two-Sided Messages• Order Effects• Positive framing• Negative framingMessage Structureand Presentation18Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  19. 19. Designing Persuasive Communications• Resonance• Message framing• One-Sided versus Two-Sided Messages• Order EffectsDepends on nature of theaudience and nature ofcompetitionMessage Structureand Presentation19Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  20. 20. Designing Persuasive Communications• Resonance• Message framing• One-Sided versus Two-Sided Messages• Order Effects• Primacy• Recency• Order of benefits• Brand nameMessage Structureand Presentation20Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  21. 21. Advertising Appeals• Comparative• Fear• Humor• Abrasive• Sex• Audience participation• Timely• Celebrities2121Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  22. 22. Comparative - It Has Positive Effects On BrandAttitudes, Purchase Intentions, and Purchases22Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  23. 23. Two Advertising Appeals Are Shownin This Ad-Humor and Fear23Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  24. 24. Types of Celebrity AppealsTable 9.62424Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  25. 25. FeedbackDetermining Effectiveness25Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Nine Slide
  26. 26. Chapter 9Questions?26
  27. 27. Chapter 9-1: The Viewer’s VoiceInfluences TV Programming1. Communication Feedback2. Should programmers and producers considerthe feedback?3. Source Credibility4. Compare and contrast Neilsen ratings andTWOP for a given episode.27

×