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Olson_PCSGA2014

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PCSGA Presentation 2014

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Olson_PCSGA2014

  1. 1. Evidence for lineage-specific DNA methylation patterns in the Pacific oyster Claire Olson Steven Roberts University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences PCSGA Vancouver, WA September 2014
  2. 2. Outline Background: epigenetics and DNA methylation Results: characterizing DNA methylation and examining degree of heritability Implications Future work
  3. 3. Epigenetics • Epi = “at, upon” • Epigenetics describes modifications to our genetic material that changes the way genes are expressed Source: http://episona.com/short-introduction-epigenetics/
  4. 4. DNA methylation • DNA methylation in organisms is diverse, variable among species, and can change genome function under external influences CH3 CG
  5. 5. DNA methylation • Epigenetics affected by nutrition and environment • Genetically identical mice • Agouti gene is differentially methylated Source: Waterland and Jirtle 2003
  6. 6. DNA methylation • Regulation of castes for honey bee queen and workers • Diet of royal jelly during larval development generates queen bees
  7. 7. DNA methylation • Vertebrates: global methylation • Invertebrates: limited methylation o Model invertebrates lack DNA methylation • E.g. Drosophila and C. elegans o Non-model invertebrates have mosaic methylation • E.g. Oysters and sea squirts o Distribution and function is uncertain
  8. 8. DNA methylation in C. gigas • Why oysters? o Important aquaculture resources o Genomic resources o Sessile
  9. 9. Characterizing DNA methylation in C. gigas • Mosaic methylation associated with gene bodies • Overall 15% genome methylation • No methylation in mitochondrial genome • Positive relationship between methylation and gene expression Source: Olson and Roberts, 2014
  10. 10. To what degree are DNA methylation patterns: Heritable? Variable between individuals?
  11. 11. Experimental Design Male 1 Male 2 Sperm Sperm
  12. 12. Experimental Design 72hpf 120hpf Tank 2 Tank 1 Male 1 Male 2 Sperm Sperm
  13. 13. Genes Sperm coverage 2_120hpf 2_72hpf 1_120hpf 1_72hpf 2_sperm 1_sperm Results: Whole genome
  14. 14. Genes Sperm coverage 2_120hpf 2_72hpf 1_120hpf 1_72hpf 2_sperm 1_sperm Results: Whole genome
  15. 15. Results: Hierarchical clustering • Oyster lineages more similar in their methylation patterns
  16. 16. Results: Hierarchical clustering • Of loci we have data for in male sperm samples: o 63,593 loci had a methylation difference of at least 20% o 14,449 loci had a methylation difference of at least 50% o 3,027 loci had a methylation difference of at least 90%
  17. 17. Results: Differential methylation • Majority of differentially methylated loci are found within transposable elements Transposable element
  18. 18. Conclusions • Research suggests epigenetic inheritance • Presence of lineage-specific methylation patterns • Majority of differentially methylated loci found within transposable elements
  19. 19. Future Work • Preliminary evidence that environment can influence oyster epigenome o Different methylation patterns among oysters experiencing heat shock Pre-exposure sampling Post-exposure sampling Heat Shock MBD-Chip Tiling arrays compare methylation
  20. 20. Implications • If future investigations confirm that DNA methylation is: o Heritable o Affected by environment o Different from genetic variation • Implications: o Selective breeding programs o Aquaculture
  21. 21. Acknowledgments • Roberts Lab o Steven Roberts o Sam White o Brent Vadopalas o Mackenzie Gavery o Emma Timmins-Schiffman o Jake Heare • Taylor Shellfish o Molly Jackson • NSF • NSA-PCS

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