Open and accessible!
         Christian Heilmann | http://icant.co.uk | http://wait-till-i.com Taipei, Taiwan, April 2009
Hi, I am Chris.
Today I want to talk to you
about my idea of
accessibility.
I’ve been dealing with
accessibility ever since I
started web development.
And I am very much amazed
about how many wrong ideas
about accessibility are
floating around.
Accessibility is not about
complying with a law not to
be sued.
Accessibility is also not about
making sure you follow a
standard and tick all the
boxes.
Accessibility is about allowing
access.
Accessibility is about not
confusing people.
Accessibility is about warning
people of dangers.
Accessibility is about seeing
disabilities or technical
constraint as an opportunity to
enhance experiences for
everybody.
When I talk to developers and
designers about accessibility I
hear one sentence a lot.
“Why should we do something
for people with disabilities, how
many users are we going to
have that are blind anyways?”
One of my answers is:
“Every day of your life you are
using a product that was built
for a disabled person and it
makes yo...
Can you guess what that is?
Loudspeakers!
There are many more
examples.
OCR scanning




               http://www.flickr.com/photos/51753258@N00/3255725751 – shokai
Subtitles/Captions
Wheelchair ramps for
luggage transport.
Would your life not be much
harder without these?
Instead of seeing accessibility as
this chance to build something
great for everybody...
We normally tend to see it as
an extra effort...
...something that needs to be
done rather than something
we want to do.
Which leads to results of a
different kind.
We all are here to celebrate
the idea of open software and
practices.
Yet not many of us use our
skills to *really* open the
web to all.
When it comes to
accessibility, we get confused
and misguided.
So I am here today
to tell you to first
and foremost to not
forget to have fun
making things
accessible.
Open source means
collaborating and constantly
improving.
Something that is pretty alien
to the accessibility world and
guidelines right now.
A lot of guidelines and even
laws get stuck talking about
technical problems.
And fixing technical problems
is what we do.
Let me show you some
examples of making things
more accessible.
One way:
Keeping things simple
Search box on a Yahoo site.
JavaScript dependent links
changing the action of the
form.
How did we change this to
work without JavaScript?
We analysed what users want
to do here:
            Define type of search,
               enter search term,
             ...
And used what allows them
to do exactly that (and CSS to
make it pretty)
How about this one?
Analyse what data
you display, and find
the easiest way to
show it.
Then make it look the
way you want it to.
Another way:
Showing dedication to build
an excellent accessible
solution.
http://finance.yahoo.com/currency-converter?
           u#from=USD;to=EUR;amt=1
http://developer.yahoo.net/blog/archives/
    2009/01/accessible_converter.html
Another way:
Build with things that have
accessibility features.
Web applications can be built
using existing lego bricks of
controls.
We’ve already created all of
these bricks in libraries: Dojo,
YUI, jQuery...
And now more and more of
those get ARIA support for
accessibility.
http://yuiblog.com/blog/category/accessibility/
Another way:
Re-think your idea of the web.
Users see the web as an
interface.
Developers have x-ray vision
and see code
I moved even further and
found my own idea of the
web.
*




Sweet data to pick and mix.
                   http://www.flickr.com/photos/25802865@N08/3195857208/
Companies provide us with
APIs and web services to get
to the data behind the
interface.
We can use these to build
accessible interfaces to these
systems.
Screenshot of Easy YouTube



 http://icant.co.uk/easy-youtube/?http://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkdZmi85gxk
What we learn there we can
feed back to other people
who have similar interfaces...
Screenshots of uk.video.yahoo.com with and
            without JavaScript




    http://uk.video.yahoo.com/
...which results in much more
accessible new versions.
This can be done even with
sites that do not have APIs.
http://www.nicosteiner.de/archives/118-YQL,-
         YUI-und-Yahoo!-Pipes.html
http://developer.yahoo.com/yql/console/
What we need is real
information about what
barriers people face when
going online.
And I have started
collecting this
information...


http://scriptingenabled.org/presentations/
...and invited friends to use it
to build more examples of
alternative, accessible
interfaces.
The conference itself is an
open idea, you can do one
here if you want:
      http://scriptingenabled.org/host-your-own-sc...
Things that need much more
fixing is rich content: music
and videos.
Especially video needs more
solutions for captioning.
What we need are simple
interfaces that make sense
and are fun to use.
You have the tools available
for you.
http://www.schillmania.com/projects/soundmanager2/
People played already with
this – pointing to a possible
great solution.
http://dt.in.th/2008–05–18.javascript-karaoke-lyric-scroller.html
For video, there’s the JW FLV
Media Player.
Screenshot of the JW Video Player




http://www.jeroenwijering.com/?item=JW_FLV_Player
Using this, you can embed FLV
videos easily into web sites
and have an API to control
them.
Using the right meta data,
you can also add audio
descriptions and captions.
Screenshot of the JW player with
        captioning and audio description
       showing a scene from Coronation
         ...
So here we are.
You can build accessible web
applications.
You need the right
communication.
Creativity
and
patience.
Dedication to get down to
the source of things.
And other eager people to
work with.
Thanks.
Any questions?
Christian Heilmann
http://icant.co.uk
http://wait-till-i.com
http://scriptingenabled.org
http://twi...
OSDC - Open and Accessible
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My presentation at the open source developer conference in Taipei, Taiwan about the opportunities of accessibility

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OSDC - Open and Accessible

  1. Open and accessible! Christian Heilmann | http://icant.co.uk | http://wait-till-i.com Taipei, Taiwan, April 2009
  2. Hi, I am Chris.
  3. Today I want to talk to you about my idea of accessibility.
  4. I’ve been dealing with accessibility ever since I started web development.
  5. And I am very much amazed about how many wrong ideas about accessibility are floating around.
  6. Accessibility is not about complying with a law not to be sued.
  7. Accessibility is also not about making sure you follow a standard and tick all the boxes.
  8. Accessibility is about allowing access.
  9. Accessibility is about not confusing people.
  10. Accessibility is about warning people of dangers.
  11. Accessibility is about seeing disabilities or technical constraint as an opportunity to enhance experiences for everybody.
  12. When I talk to developers and designers about accessibility I hear one sentence a lot.
  13. “Why should we do something for people with disabilities, how many users are we going to have that are blind anyways?”
  14. One of my answers is: “Every day of your life you are using a product that was built for a disabled person and it makes your life much easier.”
  15. Can you guess what that is?
  16. Loudspeakers!
  17. There are many more examples.
  18. OCR scanning http://www.flickr.com/photos/51753258@N00/3255725751 – shokai
  19. Subtitles/Captions
  20. Wheelchair ramps for luggage transport.
  21. Would your life not be much harder without these?
  22. Instead of seeing accessibility as this chance to build something great for everybody...
  23. We normally tend to see it as an extra effort...
  24. ...something that needs to be done rather than something we want to do.
  25. Which leads to results of a different kind.
  26. We all are here to celebrate the idea of open software and practices.
  27. Yet not many of us use our skills to *really* open the web to all.
  28. When it comes to accessibility, we get confused and misguided.
  29. So I am here today to tell you to first and foremost to not forget to have fun making things accessible.
  30. Open source means collaborating and constantly improving.
  31. Something that is pretty alien to the accessibility world and guidelines right now.
  32. A lot of guidelines and even laws get stuck talking about technical problems.
  33. And fixing technical problems is what we do.
  34. Let me show you some examples of making things more accessible.
  35. One way: Keeping things simple
  36. Search box on a Yahoo site.
  37. JavaScript dependent links changing the action of the form.
  38. How did we change this to work without JavaScript?
  39. We analysed what users want to do here: Define type of search, enter search term, submit form.
  40. And used what allows them to do exactly that (and CSS to make it pretty)
  41. How about this one?
  42. Analyse what data you display, and find the easiest way to show it. Then make it look the way you want it to.
  43. Another way: Showing dedication to build an excellent accessible solution.
  44. http://finance.yahoo.com/currency-converter? u#from=USD;to=EUR;amt=1
  45. http://developer.yahoo.net/blog/archives/ 2009/01/accessible_converter.html
  46. Another way: Build with things that have accessibility features.
  47. Web applications can be built using existing lego bricks of controls.
  48. We’ve already created all of these bricks in libraries: Dojo, YUI, jQuery...
  49. And now more and more of those get ARIA support for accessibility.
  50. http://yuiblog.com/blog/category/accessibility/
  51. Another way: Re-think your idea of the web.
  52. Users see the web as an interface.
  53. Developers have x-ray vision and see code
  54. I moved even further and found my own idea of the web.
  55. * Sweet data to pick and mix. http://www.flickr.com/photos/25802865@N08/3195857208/
  56. Companies provide us with APIs and web services to get to the data behind the interface.
  57. We can use these to build accessible interfaces to these systems.
  58. Screenshot of Easy YouTube http://icant.co.uk/easy-youtube/?http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkdZmi85gxk
  59. What we learn there we can feed back to other people who have similar interfaces...
  60. Screenshots of uk.video.yahoo.com with and without JavaScript http://uk.video.yahoo.com/
  61. ...which results in much more accessible new versions.
  62. This can be done even with sites that do not have APIs.
  63. http://www.nicosteiner.de/archives/118-YQL,- YUI-und-Yahoo!-Pipes.html
  64. http://developer.yahoo.com/yql/console/
  65. What we need is real information about what barriers people face when going online.
  66. And I have started collecting this information... http://scriptingenabled.org/presentations/
  67. ...and invited friends to use it to build more examples of alternative, accessible interfaces.
  68. The conference itself is an open idea, you can do one here if you want: http://scriptingenabled.org/host-your-own-scripting-enabled/
  69. Things that need much more fixing is rich content: music and videos.
  70. Especially video needs more solutions for captioning.
  71. What we need are simple interfaces that make sense and are fun to use.
  72. You have the tools available for you.
  73. http://www.schillmania.com/projects/soundmanager2/
  74. People played already with this – pointing to a possible great solution.
  75. http://dt.in.th/2008–05–18.javascript-karaoke-lyric-scroller.html
  76. For video, there’s the JW FLV Media Player.
  77. Screenshot of the JW Video Player http://www.jeroenwijering.com/?item=JW_FLV_Player
  78. Using this, you can embed FLV videos easily into web sites and have an API to control them.
  79. Using the right meta data, you can also add audio descriptions and captions.
  80. Screenshot of the JW player with captioning and audio description showing a scene from Coronation Street. http://www.jeroenwijering.com/?item=JW_FLV_Player
  81. So here we are.
  82. You can build accessible web applications.
  83. You need the right communication.
  84. Creativity and patience.
  85. Dedication to get down to the source of things.
  86. And other eager people to work with.
  87. Thanks. Any questions? Christian Heilmann http://icant.co.uk http://wait-till-i.com http://scriptingenabled.org http://twitter.com/codepo8

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