Greenbelt Food Forest: Phase I Photo Journal

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City of Greenbelt Public Works, Camp Fire USA, Citizens to Conserve and Restore Indian Creek (CCRIC), CHEARS – Chesapeake Education, Arts, and Research Society, Ancestral Knowledge, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust are all working together to help improve water quality in our local watershed and throughout the Chesapeake Bay region by establishing the Greenbelt Food Forest.

Phase I of the project consisted of rain garden installation and water quality monitoring workshops linked with a workday at Three Sisters Demonstration Garden. Our goal is to provide safe outdoor classroom spaces to be used for intergenerational education, eco-arts, food production and community gatherings.

The City of Greenbelt was founded on the concepts of community design & “green” planning, in which every acre is put to its best and most sustainable use. Permaculture and other best land management practices are now being formally established throughout the city.

A major focus of Permaculture is Forest Gardening, which looks at the ecological interactions of healthy forest systems and integrates those strategies into our own methods of food production, water capture & storage, development, and energy usage.

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  • Picture background with textured caption(Intermediate)To reproduce the textured shape effects on this slide, do the following:On the Home tab, in the Slides group, click Layout, and then click Blank.Also on the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Shapes, and then under Rectangles click Rectangle.On the slide, drag to draw a rectangle.Select the rectangle. Under DrawingTools, on the Format tab, in the Size group, enter 5” into the Height box and 4” into the Width box.Also on the Format tab, in the ShapeStyles group, click the FormatShape dialog box launcher. In the FormatShape dialog box, click Fill in the left pane, in the Fill pane, click Picture or texture fill, and then do the following:Click the button next to Textures and then click and then click Pink Tissue Paper (fourth row).In the Transparency box, enter 20%.Also in the FormatPicture dialog box, click LineColor in the left pane, and in the LineColor pane select Noline.Also in the FormatPicture dialog box, click PictureColor in the left pane, and in the PictureColor pane, under Recolor, click the button next to Presets, and then click Orange, Accent color 6 Dark (second row).Also in the FormatPicture dialog box, click Glow and Soft Edges in the left pane, and then in the Glow and Soft Edges pane, do the following:Under Glow, click the button next to Presets, and then click No Glow.Under SoftEdges, in the Size box enter 5 pt.On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Shapes, and then under Rectangles click Rectangle.On the slide, drag to draw a rectangle.Select the second rectangle. Under DrawingTools, on the Format tab, in the ShapeStyles group, click ShapeFill, point to Gradient, and click MoreGradients. In the FormatShape dialog box, click Fill in the left pane, in the Fill pane, select Gradient fill, and then do the following:In the Type list, select Linear.In the Angle box, enter 90°.Under Gradient stops, click Add gradient stops or Remove gradient stops until two stops appear in the slider.Also under Gradientstops, customize the gradient stops as follows:Select the first stop in the slider, and then do the following:In the Position box, enter 0%.Click the button next to Color, and then under ThemeColors click Black, Text 1 (first row).In the Transparency box, enter 100%.Select the last stop in the slider, and then do the following:In the Position box, enter 100%.Click the button next to Color, and then under ThemeColors click Black, Text 1 (first row).In the Transparency box, enter 50%.Also in the FormatPicture dialog box, click Glow and Soft Edges in the left pane, and then in the Glow and Soft Edges pane, under SoftEdges, in the Size box enter 5 pt.Also in the FormatPicture dialog box, click Size in the left pane, in the Size pane, under Size and rotate, enter 5” into the Height box and 4” into the Width box.Press and hold CTRL, and then select both rectangles. On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Align, and then do the following:Click AlignSelectedObjects.Click AlignCenter.Click AlignMiddle.To reproduce the clip art effects on this slide, do the following:On the Insert tab, in the Images group, click ClipArt. In the ClipArt pane, do the following:In the Search for box, enter 00322861.wmf.In the Results should be list, select All media file types.Select Include Office.com content.Click Go.Double-click the thumbnail of the clip art to insert it onto the slide.Select the clip art. Under PictureTools, on the Format tab, in the Size group, enter 0.56” into the Height box and 2” into the Width box.Also on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click Group, and then click Ungroup to convert the clip art to a Microsoft Office drawing object.On the Home tab, in the Edit group, click Select, and then click Selection Pane. In the Selection and Visibility pane, select Autoshape and press DELETE.Select the ungrouped clip art. Under DrawingTools, on the Format tab, in the ShapeStyles group, click the FormatObject dialog box launcher. In the FormatShape dialog box, click Fill in the left pane, in the Fill pane click Solidfill, and then under FillColor, do the following:in the Color box, enter Black, Text 1.In the Transparency box, enter 80%.Position the ungrouped clip art over the bottom half of the transparent rectangle.Select the ungrouped clip art. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the arrow to the right of Copy, and then click Duplicate.Select the second ungrouped clip art. On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Rotate, and then click MoreRotationOptions. In the FormatShape dialog box, click Size in the left pane, in the Size pane, under Size and rotate, in the Rotation box enter 180°.Position the second ungrouped clip art over the top half of the transparent rectangle.To reproduce the text effects on this slide, do the following:On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click TextBox.On the slide, drag to draw a text box.Enter text in the text box, and then select the text. On the Home tab, in the Font group, select Constantiafrom the Font list, select 36 pt. from the FontSize list, and then select White, Background 1 from the FontColor list.Also on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click Center.Press and hold CTRL, and then select the textured rectangle, the transparent rectangle, both ungrouped clip art, and the text box. On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Align, and then do the following:Click AlignSelectedObjects.Click AlignCenter.Press and hold CTRL, and then select both rectangles and the text box. On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Align, and then click AlignMiddle.To reproduce the picture background on this slide, do the following:On the Design tab, in the Background group, click BackgroundStyles, and then click FormatBackground.In the FormatBackground dialog box, click Fill in the left pane, in the Fill pane, click Picture or texture fill, and then under Insert from click File. In the Insert Picture dialog box, select a picture and then click Insert.
  • Greenbelt is developing a food forest (language from Kim’s packet)
  • City of Greenbelt Public Works, Camp Fire USA, Citizens to Conserve and Restore Indian Creek (CCRIC), and CHEARS – Chesapeake Education, Arts, and Research Society, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust are all working together to help improve water quality in our local watershed and throughout the Chesapeake Bay. We have been hard at work in Greenbelt to make our environment a clean and enjoyable place to visit and live.
  • Residents of Greenbelt and friends of the Earth gathered at Springhill Lake Recreation Center to enjoy a day outside and work to make a better environment for all of us. [insert pic: jpg of flyer]
  • The area around Springhill Lake is very susceptible to runoff and poor water quality because so much land has been cleared for human infrastructure.
  • The area around Springhill Lake is very susceptible to runoff and poor water quality because so much land has been cleared for human infrastructure.
  • The City of Greenbelt joined people from all over Maryland to celebrate Earth Day 2012 outside in their communities.
  • We planned out the best placement for our plants based on ourlocation and the path of the sun…
  • then we dug…
  • …and dug…
  • …and dug……until we had enough space to plant our rain garden.
  • Planting was fun for everyone!
  • Once our rain garden was set up, we watered it so that are plants could settle into their new helpful home.
  • This was only the beginning of a large project that would take the effort of all involved to implement at its fullest.
  • CHEARS, Camp Fire USA, and CCRIC hosted a “Train the Trainer” workshop to teach local community members about water quality testing methods in Indian Creek.
  • Many parts of Greenbelt are within the Indian Creek Subwatershed, which is part of the Anacostia Watershed Network.
  • Friends of all interests and backgrounds gathered at Springhill Lake Recreation Center to learn and practice techniques in testing for pH and turbidity,…
  • …identifying and examining macroinvertebrates,…
  • …and formulating habitat assessments.
  • MOM’s Organic Market donated healthy, tasty snacks to keep us going while we learned and worked.
  • We split ourselves into partner groups to complete our surveys and tests...
  • And had lots of fun doing it.Sometimes you just have to dance it out for the environment!
  • Maria Sgambati, M.D., a trained biologist,physician, and outreach educator, spent a few hours helping us learn about the health of the creek andbest practices in measuring it.
  • Curiousneighbors stopped by to join us while we were investigating.
  • They even showed us where the tastiest mulberries grow!
  • It was a great day to be learning outside!
  • At the beginning of this training, we were not optimistic about the health of our creek.
  • During our investigation, however, we found some good news!
  • We discovered that our pH and turbidity measurements were near acceptable ranges…
  • …and we even found some sensitive species of critters, including mayflies and stoneflies!
  • Habitat assessment surveys determined that the creek’s buffer zone is much smaller than the accepted range, which will continue to cause problems if not corrected.
  • Since the Greenbelt Food Forest will be established directly adjacent to this portion of the creek, it will make a significant positive impact to the air and water quality of the watershed.
  • It will also provide a more functional place for the community to enjoy, adding to the playground, mulberry trees, and Three Sisters Demonstration Garden Outdoor Classroom and food crop plants.
  • We all will get to use the skills that we learned later this summer to teach local Camp Fire USA students about our local water quality and how we measure it.
  • We’d like to give a big thank you to all those who have made Phase I of the Greenbelt Food Forest project a success! City of Greenbelt Public Works Camp Fire USA Citizens to Conserve and Restore Indian Creek (CCRIC) CHEARS – Chesapeake Education, Arts, and Research Society Chesapeake Bay TrustAnd a special thank you to YOU – our friends and neighbors in Greenbelt!
  • Greenbelt Food Forest: Phase I Photo Journal

    1. 1. www.greenbeltfoodforest.com Springhill Lake 6101 Cherrywood LaneRecreation Center Greenbelt, MD 20770 Phase I Photo Journal
    2. 2. The City of Greenbelt was founded on the concepts ofcommunity design & “green” planning, in which every acre is put to its best and most sustainable use. Permacultureand other best land management practices are now being formally established throughout the city.A major focus of Permaculture is Forest Gardening, which looks at the ecological interactions of healthy forest systems and integrates those strategies into our own methods of food production, water capture & storage, natural building, and energy usage. http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6014/5950647589_9c3808d0c3_z.jpg
    3. 3. City of Greenbelt Public Works, Camp Fire USA, Citizens to Conserve and Restore Indian Creek (CCRIC), CHEARS – ChesapeakeEducation, Arts, and Research Society, Ancestral Knowledge, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust are all working together to help improve water quality in our local watershed and throughout the Chesapeake Bay region by establishing the Greenbelt Food Forest.Phase I of the project consisted of rain garden installation and waterquality monitoring workshops linked with a workday at Three Sisters Demonstration Garden. Our goal is to provide safe outdoor classroom spaces to be used for intergenerational education, eco- arts, food production and community gatherings.
    4. 4. Earth Day CelebrationSaturday, April 21, 2012
    5. 5. Mayor Judith Davis and Council Members Emmett Jordan, Konrad Herling and Edward Putens dig to plant anative black chokeberry, held by council member Silke Pope.
    6. 6. Residents of Greenbelt and friends of the Earthgathered at Springhill Lake Recreation Center to learn more about the purpose of rain gardens and their impact on nearby Indian Creek stream. Rain gardens will help to capture water, reduce erosion, attract beneficial pollinators, and bring beauty to the park, which improves the quality of life for residents and visitors…
    7. 7. …even for our smallest friends!
    8. 8. The prepared areas were very susceptible to storm water runoff due to the sloped impervious parking lot surface, so rain gardens were installed on each side of the drain pipe that leads to Indian Creek.
    9. 9. Mayor Judith Davis (holding shovel) and Greenbelt City CouncilMembers, along with residents of Greenbelt, plant the first shrub to kick-off the celebration of Earth Day 2012.
    10. 10. Lesley Riddle, Assistant Director of Public Works for the City of Greenbelt, planned out the design of the gardenand the selection of native Chesapeake Bay friendly plants.
    11. 11. We also planted some trees, oneof which is held by City Council member RodneyRoberts, leading to the stream…
    12. 12. …with help fromMiss Greenbelt and friends…
    13. 13. We had plenty ofhelpers, planting a cinnamon fern on the edge.
    14. 14. Planting was fun for everyone!
    15. 15. Once our rain garden was set up, Kim Walsh from CHEARS wateredthe plants to help them settle into their new habitat.
    16. 16. This is only the beginning of the Greenbelt Food Forest project inconnection with CHEARS’ Three Sisters Demonstration Gardens project.
    17. 17. Water Quality MonitoringSaturday, May 19, 2012
    18. 18. CHEARS, Camp Fire USA, and CCRIC hosted a “Train the Trainer” workshop to teach local community members about water quality testing methods in Indian Creek.
    19. 19. Many parts of Greenbeltare within the Indian Creek sub-watershed, which ispart of the Anacostia River that flows into the Chesapeake Bay. (http://www.ccric.org/IC_Watershed/IC.htm)
    20. 20. People of all interests and backgrounds gathered to learn and practice techniques for measuring pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and temperature…
    21. 21. …and how to identify andexamine macroinvertebrates that tell us the biodiversity and health of the stream.
    22. 22. We studied the habitat and examined the stream as an ecosystem.
    23. 23. MOM’s Organic Market in College Park donated healthy andtasty snacks to keep us going while we learned and worked.
    24. 24. We split ourselves intopartner groups to complete our surveys and tests…
    25. 25. …and had lots of fun doing it. Sometimes you just have todance it out for the environment!
    26. 26. Maria Sgambati, M.D., a trained biologist, physician, and outreach educator, spent a fewhours helping us learn about the health of the creek and best practices in measuring it.
    27. 27. Adults and youth in thecommunity joined us to learn observationtechniques and how to use the equipment to collect stream data.
    28. 28. We snacked on ripe mulberries from trees in the area as we collected the data.
    29. 29. It was a great day to be learning outside!
    30. 30. At the beginning of this training, we were not optimistic about the health of our creek.
    31. 31. During ourinvestigation, however, we found some good news!
    32. 32. We discovered that our pH andturbidity measurements were near acceptable ranges…
    33. 33. …and we even found some sensitive species of insects, including mayflies and stoneflies!
    34. 34. Habitat assessment surveysdetermined that the creek’sbuffer zone is much smaller than the accepted range, which will continue to cause problems if not corrected.
    35. 35. Since the Greenbelt Food Forest will be established directly adjacent to this portion of the creek, the trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennials it will contain will reduce erosion, increase tree canopy, and provide a demonstration of diverse native fruits and plants.
    36. 36. It will also provide a more functional place for the community to enjoy, adding to the playground, mulberry trees, and Three Sisters Demonstration Garden’s outdoor classroom.
    37. 37. We will get to use the skills that we learned later this summer to teach local Camp Fire USA andGreenbelt Middle School studentsabout our local water quality and monitoring techniques.
    38. 38. We’d like to give a big thank you to all those who have made Phase I of the Greenbelt Food Forest project a success!• CHEARS – Chesapeake Education, Arts,and Research Society• City of Greenbelt Public Works• Camp Fire USA• Citizens to Conserve and Restore IndianCreek (CCRIC)• Greenbelt Advisory Committee onEnvironmental Sustainability (Green ACES)• Ancestral Knowledge• Chesapeake Bay Trust And a special thank you to ourfriends and neighbors in Greenbelt! Thank You!

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