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Scrum Book Of Knowledge - Reading Notes, Part#1

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Wish to implement SCRUM, Agility practices ?
Juste have a llo, at this PPT and come back to us !

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Scrum Book Of Knowledge - Reading Notes, Part#1

  1. 1. Digital performance. LE PARTENAIRE DE RÉFÉRENCE DES ENTREPRISES DANS LA DÉFINITION, LA MISE EN ŒUVRE ET LE PILOTAGE DE LEUR TRANSFORMATION DIGITALE READING NOTES PART#1 SBOK™ Guide 2013 Edition <V1.0> - <January 2016> ChDessus@sqli.com FOrtega@sqli.com
  2. 2. DOCUMENT REVISION HISTORY Vers. Date Modifications Author 1.0 29 Jan 2016 ChDessus REVISION HISTORY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 2
  3. 3. SUMMARY SUBTITLE +Introduction +Principles +Organization +Scalability of Scrum +Scrum VS Traditional Project Management SUMMARY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 3 +Popular HR theories and their relevance to SCRUM +Business Justification +Quality +Change +Risk
  4. 4. + The objective of this PPT document is to give a quick overview of a 342 pages book on SCRUM : the SBOK™ Guide, 2013 Edition + Full guide publication site : http://www.scrumstudy.com/SBOK/SCRUMstudy- SBOK-Guide-2013.pdf + This document is the part #1. It covers the book content from page 1 to page 150 (more or less…). Part#2 is under preparation. + Our intention is to give the reader the envy to learn more and to come back to the original book, the SBOK™ Guide. + I include page numbers for those of you who wish to read the fulltext in the SBOK™ Guide. I also add some links to internet sites which could be of any help for those who whish to know a bit more + All text, data, photos, video or other content in this document are the sole responsibility of the person from whom such content originates. READING NOTES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 4
  5. 5. +INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 5
  6. 6. SBOK™ GUIDE OBJECTIVES +Provides guidelines to implement SCRUM +SCRUM is understood as › The most popular Agile project management methodology › The most popular product development methodology INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 6 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  7. 7. OVERVIEW OF SCRUM + Cross-functional and self-organised teams + Sprint : Empowered teams divide their work into short work circle INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 7 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  8. 8. OVERVIEW OF SCRUM + How do you eat an elephant ? One bite at a time ! http://www.allaboutagile.com/agile-principle-5-how-do-you-eat-an-elephant/ INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 8 Added paragraph By Christine Opportunities you get with SCRUM + Reduced risk : Clear visibility of what’s completed to date throughout a project + Increased value : Delivering some benefits early; being able to release the product whenever it’s deemed good enough, rather than having to wait for all intended features to be ready + More flexibility/agility : Can choose to change direction or adapt the next iterations based on actually seeing and using the software + Better cost management : If you run over budget, some value can still be realised; you don’t have to scrap the whole thing if you run short of funds + Make sure features are developed in *priority* order www.flaticon.com
  9. 9. BRIEF HISTORY + That’s an old story, thirty years ago… + Mid 80’s, a new development strategy for manufacturing products › Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka defined a flexible and all-inclusive product development strategy where the development team works as a unit to reach a common goal, inspired from the Rugby rules. › https://hbr.org/1986/01/the-new-new-product-development-game + Mid 90’s, Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland elaborated on the Scrum concept and its applicability to software development in a presentation at the Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages & Applications (OOPSLA) conference held in 1995 in Austin › http://www.scrumguides.org/download.html INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 9 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  10. 10. WHY SCRUM ? Adaptability Motivation Transparency Faster problem resolution Continuous feedback Effective deliverables Continuous improvement Customer centric Continuous delivery of value High trust environment Sustainable pace Collaborative ownership Early delivery of high value High velocity Efficient development process Innovative environment INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 10 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Must-Do : read pages 4 & 5
  11. 11. APPLICABILITY +The term “products” refer to a product, a service or any other deliverable › SCRUM can be applied to any project in any industry › For small or complex projects with team as few as 6 members up to several hundred members › SCRUM supports product or service development INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 11 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide. OR ServiceProduct Example : new model of car, new phone or tablet Example : IT sofware development
  12. 12. +PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 12
  13. 13. SCRUM PRINCIPLES PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 13 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide. + Empirical process control Transparency – Inspection – Adaptation + Self-organisation Today’s workers deliver greater value when self organised whith a better team buy-in and shared ownership. + Collaboration Awareness – Articulation – Appropriation + Value-based prioritisation Deliver maximum business value from early in the project and throughout + Time-boxing Limiting constraint, to manage effectively planning and execution + Iterative development Better manage changes Build products that satisfacy customer needs.
  14. 14. EMPIRICAL PROCESS CONTROL +Decisions are made based on observation and experimentation +No detailed upfront planning +Empirical process control based on › Transparency › Inspection › Adaptation PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 14 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 22 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  15. 15. EMPIRICAL PROCESS CONTROL +Transparency – Open work culture : › Artefacts are shared with everyone : Project Vision Statement is shared Prioritized Product Backlog with prioritized User Stories Release planning schedule › Clear visibility into the team work progress Scrumboard, Bundown Chart › Meetings Daily standand up meeting Sprint review meetings PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 15 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 22-23 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  16. 16. EMPIRICAL PROCESS CONTROL +Inspection : › Information Radiators show the team progress to complete tasks (Scrumboard) › Feedback from customers and stakeholders › Inspection and approval of deliverables by the Product Owner PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 16 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 24 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  17. 17. EMPIRICAL PROCESS CONTROL +Adaptation : › Open discussions on impediments during the daily sprint meetings › Risks identification and assessment performed and iterated throughout the project life › Improvements results in change requests › The SGB offer guidance and expertise to the Scrum team when required › During the Retrospect Sprint process, agreed improvements are determined › During the Retrospect Project Meeting, participants documents lessons learned in order to improve processes and address ineffeciencies. PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 17 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 24-25 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  18. 18. SELF ORGANISATION +Great employees are self-motivated and seek to accept greater responsibility. +Leadership style : « Servant Leardership » https://www.greenleaf.org/what-is-servant-leadership/ +Benefits of self organisation : › Team buy-in and shared ownership › Motivation  enhanced performance level of the team › Innovative & creative environment PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 18 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 27 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  19. 19. SELF ORGANISATION +Team objectives › Understand the Project Vision and how the project is going to deliver value to the organisation. › Task breakdown and estimate User Stories › Deliver tangible results accepted by the stakeholders › Share expertise, resolve individual problems, clarify discrepencies and doubts  Cross-functional team › Open mind : be open to learn new things. Upgrade knowledge on a countinuous basis › Maintain stability of team members throughout the project duration PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 19 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 28 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  20. 20. COLLABORATION +Scrum team members work together and collaborate with stakeholders to create and validate deliverables of the project in order to meet the « Project Vision » goals +3A core-dimensions › Awareness  Individuals working together need to be aware of each other’s work. › Articulation  Collaborating individuals must partition work into units, divide the units among team members, and then after the work is done, reintegrate it. › Appropriation  Adapting technology to one’s own situation; the technology may be used in a manner completely different than expected by the designers. PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 20 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 29-31 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  21. 21. COLLABORATION + Benefits of collaboration Minimize the need for changes due to poorly clarified requirements : › The product owner collaborate with the stakeholder to create the project Vision. › The Scrum Team collaborate continuously with the Product Owner and Stakeholder through a Prioritized Project Backlog Risks are identified and dealt efficiently throughout the project duration Continuous improvement is ensured through lessons learned +Whenever possible, prefer colocated teams to facilitate collaboration among team members. PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 21 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 29-31 in the original SBOK™ Guide. « Customer collaboration over Contract negotiation » Agile Manifesto
  22. 22. BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION +Before the project starts, the organisation should perform a business assessment › Makes the decision makers understand the business needs for a change, a new product/service +Results and outcomes are uncertain › it is impossible to garantee project sucess at completion +Scrump develops the concept of « VALUE-DRIVEN DELIVERY » : › Start delivering results as early as possible › Demontrates and proves the worth of the project to interested stakeholders › Adapts and changes the project objectives and process if the business justification changes INTRODUCTION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 22 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  23. 23. VALUE BASED PRIORISATION + The Scrum framework is driven by the goal of delivering maximum business value in a minimum time span + Prioritization : › Determination of the order and separation of what must be done now, from what needs to be done later in order to deliver a valuable product to the customer on an early and continuous basis. PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 23 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 31-32 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Waterfall projects • Tasks prioritization • Planning activities Agile projects • Userstories prioritization according to their value for the customer • Continuouly update the Prioritized Product backlog Project Manager Product Owner
  24. 24. VALUE BASED PRIORISATION +Prioritisation is based on VALUE, RISK and DEPENDENCY PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 24 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 31-32 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Must-do : Read « Product Owner role »
  25. 25. TIME-BOXING +Time-boxing consists of fixing a certain amount of time to each activity in a Scrum Project. +Advantages of Time-Boxing : Efficient development process Less overheads High velocity for teams PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 25 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 33-35 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  26. 26. TIME-BOXING PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 26 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 33-35 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Activity Time boxing Objective Participants Sprint 1 to 6 weeks Create deliverables Product Owner Scrum team Scrum master Daily standup meeting 15mn Report the work progress Scrum team Sprint planning meeting 8h for one-month Sprint Define the Sprint objectives Estimate tasks Product Owner Scrum team Sprint review meeting 4h for one-month Sprint Demonstrate Sprint deliverables to the Product Owner Validate deliverables Product Owner Scrum team Retrospec Speint Meeting 4h for one-month Sprint Review the previous Spring : processes followed, tools employed, communication, collaboration Scrum team
  27. 27. ITERATIVE DEVELOPMENT + Iterative Development of Deliverables contributes to deliver a maximum of Business Value in a minimum time span. + During project initiation, customers may not be able to describe precisely all requirements. + During the course of the project, iterative development allows stakeholders to better understand what need to be delivered : these learnings are incorporated continuously in an iterative manner to the project. + The iterative model allows flexibility and any change requested can be included as part of the project : › User stories are written constantly througout the project span › During initial stages, User Stories written are high-level functionnnalities  EPICS › Groom Prioritized Product Backlog EPICS are brocken down into smaller User Stories  The Sprint Backlog define the Sprint deliverables. PRINCIPLES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 27 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 36-37 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  28. 28. +ORGANISATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 28
  29. 29. SCRUM ASPECTS | Organisation + Core Roles : mandatory roles › Product owner Responsible for achieving the maximum business value › Scrum master Facilitator for the Scrum team : guides, facilitates and teaches › Scrum team Understands the deliverables and create the project deliverables : products or services + Non-Core Roles : non-mandatory roles › Stakeholder(s) Customers, users and sponsors › Scrum Guidance Body (SGB) Set of documents + group of experts involved with defining quality expectations, government regulations, security. SGB guides the Product Owner and Scrum Master work. › Vendors External organisations that provide products or services › Chief product owner Facilitating the work of multiple Product Owners in larger projects › Chief Scrum master Coordinating activities of multiple Scrum Masters/Scrum Team in larger projects ORGANISATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 29 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  30. 30. CORE ROLES ORGANISATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 30 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 13 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  31. 31. PRODUCT OWNER +Represents the interests of the stakeholder community to the Scrum Team. +The PO is the voice of the customer : He/she represents the customer and thus ensures that explicit and implicit customer requirements are translated into User Stories in the Prioritized Product Backlog +Responsible for Ensuring clear communication of product or service functionality requirements to the Scrum team Defining acceptance criteria thus ensuring those criteria are met Ensuring the Scrum team delivers value ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 31 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 43-45 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  32. 32. PRODUCT OWNER + Product Owner role is key in Agile projects. He/she embodies the Value Based Priorisation ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 32 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 31-32 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Product Owner (PO) role in Agile projects • Receives the business requirements from the customer and write the Project Vision • The PO must have a very good understanding of the project business justification. • Throughout the project, the PO focus constantly on the increased ROI. Must understand which business requirement brings the most value (ROI) • Write business requirements in the form of User Stories • Determine the criticality and prioritises User Stories : define what deliverables and hence value are delivered in each Sprint : o Continuously consider the value for the customer o Continuouly update the Prioritized Product Backlog o Work with the Scrum Team to understand the project risks and potential impacts o Take into account dependencies identified by the Scrum team • At the end of each Sprint, the PO accepts or rejects deliverables based on acceptance criteria.
  33. 33. PRODUCT OWNER ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 33 The PO must understand and support the needs and interests of all stakeholders The PO must understand the needs and workings of the Scrum team The PO maintains a dual view Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 43-45 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  34. 34. PRODUCT OWNER +Other responsibilities › Determine the initial overall requirements for the project › May interact withethe program product owner and the portfolio product owner to ensure that the project aligns with the direction taken by senior management › Reprents users of the product / service › Secure the initial and ongoing financial resources for the project › Focus on value creation and ROI › Ensure the delivery of the product / service and assess the viability of the product / service delivered. +Chief product owner, nominated in case of large projects in order to coodinate the work of multiple PO : › Prepare and maintain the overall Prioritized Product Backlog › Interfaces with the Program PO to ensure alignment ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 34 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 43-45 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  35. 35. PRODUCT OWNER | Responsibilities in the various scrum processes ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 35 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 43-45 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  36. 36. SCRUM MASTER +« Servant leader » of the Scrum team › Moderates and facilitates team interactions › Team coach and motivator › Ensures that the team has a productive work environment › Guards the team from external influences › Removes obstacles › Enforces Scrum principles, processes ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 36 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 45-47 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  37. 37. SCRUM MASTER| Responsibilities in the various scrum processes ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 37 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 46 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  38. 38. CHIEF SCRUM MASTER +Large projects require multiple Scrum teams to work in parallel. Coordination across various Scrum is done through the Scrum of Scrums (SoS) Meeting +The Chief Scrum Master is responsible for › communicating informations gathered from one team to other teams. › addressing impediments that impact more than one Scrum team ORGANISATION | Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 38 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 47 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Questions asked during the SoS meeting
  39. 39. STAKEHOLDER +Definition A group or individual with a relationship to the change, the need, or the solution. Stakeholders are often defined in terms of interest in, impact on, and influence over the change. Stakeholders are grouped based on their relationship to the needs, changes, and solutions. +Source BABOK 3, A GUIDE TO THE BUSINESS ANALYSIS BODY OF KNOWLEDGE ® Page 22 ORGANISATION | Non-Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 39
  40. 40. STAKEHOLDER | Sponsor +The sponsor is a key stakeholder The indiviual who provides the funding and other resources for a project +Sponsors expect clarity on Benefits of implementing Scrum Target deadlines and estimated costs of Scrum projects Overall risks involved in Scrum projects and the steps to mitigate them Expected release dates and final Deliverables ORGANISATION | Non-Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 40 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 55 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  41. 41. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT +Recommendations to maintain stakeholder engagement and support Ensure effective collaboration and stakeholder involvement in the project Continually assess business impact Maintain regular communication with stakeholders Manage stakeholders' expectations ORGANISATION | Non-Core Roles <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 41 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 55 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  42. 42. SUMMARY OF RESPONSIBILITIES ORGANISATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 42 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 56 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  43. 43. +SCALABILITY OF SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 43
  44. 44. DEFINITION SCALABILITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 44 It’s like replacing all components of a car while driving at 100 mph Mike Krieger (Instagram) +The ability of a system to : › increase its capacity under an increased load when resources are added. › maintain its functionality and performance in case of a high demand.
  45. 45. SCRUM +Scrum is applicable › To small or complex projects with teams as few as 6 members up to several hundred members › To various projects of any size or complexity » Portfolios, programs, and/or projects in any industry » Products, services, or any other results to be delivered to stakeholders SCALABILITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 45 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  46. 46. SCRUM TEAMS +Ideally, scrum teams have 6 to 10 members +It can be scaled to more than 10 members : › Multiple scrum teams can work on the same project in parallel › « Convene Scrum of Scrums » process to coordinates the various Scrum Team and ensuring synchronization › All Scrum teams are represented in the Scrum of Scrum meeting to share progress, impediments, chanllenges SCALABILITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 46 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  47. 47. SCRUM IN PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, PORTFOLIOS + Project Collaborative enterprise to either create new products or services or to deliver results as defined in the Project Vision Statement. Projects are usually impacted by constraints of time, cost, scope, quality, people and organizational capabilities. The objective of the project team is to create Deliverables as defined in Prioritized Product Backlog + Program Group of related projects, with the objective to deliver business outcomes as defined in the Program Vision Statement. The Prioritized Program Backlog incorporates the Prioritized Product Backlogs for all the projects in the program + Portfolio Group of related programs, with the objective to deliver business outcomes as defined in the Portfolio Vision Statement. The Prioritized Portfolio Backlog incorporates the Prioritized Program Backlogs for all the programs in the portfolio SCALABILITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 47 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 50 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 53-55 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  48. 48. SCRUM OF SCRUM OF SCRUM OF…. SCALABILITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 48 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 51-52 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  49. 49. SCRUM IN PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, PORTFOLIOS +Examples from different industries & sectors SCALABILITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 49 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 50 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  50. 50. +SCRUM vs TRADITIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 50
  51. 51. +Traditional project management › Fixes the scope, cost and schedule upfront › Focus on conducting a detailed upfront planning for the project +SCRUM › Focus on delivering products that satisfy customers requirements in small iterative shippable increments › Trying to fully map out and plan is not efficient : the environement is ever- changing. › Encourages iterative decision to maximize the project outcomes value/ROI › Knowledge workers can offer much more than their expertise SCRUM VS TRADITIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 51 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 38 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  52. 52. <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 52 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 20 in the original SBOK™ Guide. SCRUM VS TRADITIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT
  53. 53. <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 53 SCRUM VS TRADITIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT Wish to know more ? Go and read page 57 in the original SBOK™ Guide. + Traditional project management › Hierarchical Authority is delegated from higher level to lower Project sponsor delegates authority to project manager and the project manager delegates authority to team members › Emphasis is on individual accountability rather than group ownership + The project manager is responsible for successful completion of the project Takes decisions on various aspects of the project, including initiating, planning, estimating, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing. +SCRUM › Emphasis is on self-organisation and self-motivation › Team buy-in and shared ownership › Collaboration with Stakeholders to refine requirements › Collaboration among Scrum Core Team members ensures that the project is carried out Organisation structure Definition of roles & responsibilities
  54. 54. +POPULAR HR THEORIES & THEIR RELEVANCE TO SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 54
  55. 55. MASLOW’S HERARCHY OF NEEDS + Written in 1943 + To be successful, a Scrum Team needs both core and non-core team members who have reached the esteem or self-actualization levels. POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 55 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  56. 56. TUCKMAN’S MODEL OF GROUP DYNAMICS + Forming—A fun stage : everything is new and the team has not yet encountered any difficulties with the project. + Storming—The team tries to accomplish the work; however, power struggles may occur, and there is often chaos or confusion among team members. + Norming—The team begins to mature, sort out their internal differences, and find solutions to work together. It is considered a period of adjustment. + Performing—The team becomes its most cohesive, and it operates at its highest level in terms of performance. The members have evolved into an efficient team of peer professionals who are consistently productive. POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 56 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  57. 57. CONFLICT MANAGEMENT + Conflict management techniques › Used by team members to manage any conflicts that arise during a Scrum project. › Sources of conflict are primarily due to schedules, priorities, resources, reporting hierarchy, technical issues, procedures, personality, and costs. + 4 approaches › 1. Win-Win  Prefered approach Cooperative attitude and an open dialogue to work through any disagreements to reach consensus › 2. Lose-Win Some team members may feel that their contributions are not being recognized or valued by others. May happen if there are members in the team (including managers) who use an authoritative or directive style of issuing orders and/or do not treat all team members equally › 3. Lose-Lose Team members may attempt to bargain or search for solutions that bring only a partial degree or temporary measure of satisfaction to the parties in a dispute. › 4. Win-Lose At times, a Scrum Master or another influential team member may believe he or she is a de facto leader or manager and try to exert their viewpoint at the expense of the viewpoints of others. POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 57 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  58. 58. LEADERSHIP STYLES + Servant Leadership Leaders employ listening, empathy, commitment, and insight. Appropriate for the Scrum Master role. + Delegating Leaders are involved in the majority of decision making; however, they delegate some planning and decision-making responsibilities to competent team members. Appropriate in situations where the leader tunes specific project details, and when time is limited + Autocratic Leaders make decisions on their own, allowing team members little This leadership style should only be used on rare occasions. + Directing Directing leaders instruct team members which tasks are required, when they should be performed and how they should be performed. POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 58 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  59. 59. LEADERSHIP STYLES + Laissez Faire With this leadership style, the team is left largely unsupervised, so the leader does not interfere with their daily work activities. Often this style leads to a state of anarchy. + Coaching/Supportive Leaders issue instructions and then support and monitor team members through listening, assisting, encouraging, and presenting a positive outlook during times of uncertainty. + Task-Oriented Leaders enforce task completion and adherence to deadlines. + Assertive Leaders confront issues and display confidence to establish authority with respect. POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 59 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  60. 60. SERVANT LEADERSHIP + Servant Leadership is the preferred leadership style for Scrum projects Product Owner and Scrum Master should be servant leaders. + History Described by Robert K. Greenleaf in an essay entitled The Servant as Leader. https://www.greenleaf.org/what-is-servant-leadership/ + 2 extreme types of leaderships : Leader first Servant first + Principle of Servant leadership › The leader is a … servant first › He/she makes sure that other people’s highest priority needs are being served › 10 traits Listening, Empathy, Healing (emotional pain), Awareness, Persuasion, Conceptualization (view and analyse problems from a broader and wide perspective), Foresight (intuitive mind, apply past lessons), Stewardship (commitment), Commitment to the growth of others, Building communities POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 60 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  61. 61. THEORY X AND THEORY Y + In 1960, written by Douglas McGregor + 2 management styles : Theory X and Theory Y + Theory X Leaders assume employees are inherently unmotivated and will avoid work if possible Leaders show an authoritarian style of management. + Theory Y Leaders assume employees are self-motivated and seek to accept greater responsibility. Leaders show a more participative management style. + All leaders in Scrum projects should subscribe to Theory Y They view individuals as important assets They work to develop their team members' skills They empower their team members They appreciate the work the team has completed to reach the project objectives. POPULAR HR THEORIES <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 61 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 58-64 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  62. 62. +BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 62
  63. 63. WHY ? +Business justification demonstrates the reason to undertake a project It answers the question “WHY” It drives all decision makings It assess the project viability and achievability +A project should be terminated if it is found to be unviable +Business justification is assessed before the project start and during the project life. BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 63 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  64. 64. FACTORS BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 64 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Factors to determine Business Justification Project reasoning Determine all factors which necessitate the project (positive or negative) Business needs Business outcomes that the projected is expected to fulfill (see project vision statement) Project benefits All measurable improvements in a product or service Opportunity cost Next best business option Project discarded in favor of the current project Major risks Uncertain and unplanned events Project Timescales Lenght and duration of a project VS the time required to realise the benefits Project costs Investments and development costs
  65. 65. PROJECT LIFE-CYCLE BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 65 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Before the project starts Throughout project execution Throughout project execution + At project end
  66. 66. VALUE-DRIVEN DELIVERY +Delivering value is at the heart of Scrum projects +Project = › Collaborative enterprise to either create new products or services or to deliver results as defined in the Project Vision Statement. › Projects are usually impacted by constraints of time, cost, scope, quality, people, and organizational capabilities. › Usually, the results generated by projects are expected to create some form of business or service value +Value is the primary reason for an organization to move forward with a project BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 66 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  67. 67. VALUE-DRIVEN DELIVERY +To provide value-driven delivery › Understand what add value to customers and users › Prioritize high value requirements on top of the Product Backlog › Create deliverables based on priorities › Decrease uncertainty and address risks that can decrease value › Work closely with stakeholders showing them product increments BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 67 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  68. 68. VALUE-DRIVEN DELIVERY BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 68 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide. + Scrum project VS Traditional projects
  69. 69. RESPONSIBILITIES IN BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 69 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Roles Responsibility Product Owner Delivers value for projects Creates business justification for projects Confirms benefit realization to stakeholders Program Product Owner Delivers value for programs Creates business justification for programs Provides value guidance for projects Approves business justification for projects Portfolio Product Owner Delivers value for portfolios Creates business justification for portfolios Provides value guidance for programs Approves business justification for programs
  70. 70. RESPONSIBILITIES IN BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 70 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Roles Responsibility Sponsor Provides funding for the project and constantly monitors the project to confirm realization of benefits Customers / users They are involved in • Defining the prioritized list of requirements and User Stories in the Prioritized Product Backlog, • Reviewing Deliverables after every Sprint or release, and confirming that benefits are realized Scrum Guidance Body Provides guidelines and recommendations Scrum master Facilitates creation of the project deliverables, manage riks, changes and impediments, coordinate the Scrum team, thus ensures that products are delivered and value is realised. Scrum team Create the deliverables of the project and contribute to realise the value for all stakeholders
  71. 71. TECHNIQUES Technique Formula Comment Return On Investment (ROI) (Project Revenue - Project Cost) / Project Cost Read more : http://www.investopedia.com/terms/r/returnoninvestment. asp ROI measures the amount of return on an investment relative to the investment’s cost. This is a performance measure to evaluate the efficiency of an investment or to compare the efficiency of a number of different investments. BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 71 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  72. 72. TECHNIQUES Technique Formula Comment Net Present Value (NPV) NPV = ∑ {Net Period Cash Flow/(1+R)^T} - Initial Investment where R is the rate of return and T is the number of time periods EXCEL Formula : NPV Read more: http://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/021115/what-formula- calculating-net-present-value-npv-excel.asp Measure of profitability used to assess a given project's potential ROI Based on estimated cash outflow and inflow for each period Internal Rate of Return (IRR) IRR is calculated using the NPV formula by solving for R if the NPV equals zero. EXCEL Formula : IRR Read more : http://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/022615/what-formula- calculating-internal-rate-return-irr-excel.asp Profitability metric to determine which projects are likely to yield the greatest return per $£€ of capital investment. The IRR is the interest rate, also called the discount rate, that is required to bring the net present value (NPV) to zero BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 72 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 65-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  73. 73. PLANNING VALUE - PROCESS + Responsabilities PO responsibility : Determine how the value is created Scrum team & Scrum master : Concentrate on what is to be developed + Value Stream Mapping : flowcharts to illustrate a process flow of information https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_stream_mapping BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 73 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 74 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  74. 74. PLANNING VALUE : CUSTOMER VALUE PRIORIZATION + Techniques BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 74 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 74 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Very simple priorization method Labeling items with Priority « 1 » « 2 » « 3 » « High » There is always a tendancy to set priority to « 1 » or « High » MoSCow « Must-have » – « Should-have » – « Could-have » – « Won’t-have » The labels are in decreasing order of priority with “Must have” features being those without which the product will have no value and “Won’t have” features being those that, although they would be nice to have, are not necessary to be included. Monopoly Money Give the custormer the « Monopoly money » equals to the amount of the project budget Ask them to distribute it amoung the User Stories The customer prioritizes based on what they are willing to pay for each User Story. 100-Point Method Give the custormer 100 points. Ask them to distribute it amoung the User Stories Method developed by Dean Leffingwell and Don Widrig (2003)
  75. 75. PLANNING VALUE : KANO ANALYSIS METHOD + Developed in 1984 by Noriaky Kano « A product or service will only be successful if it effectively solves one or more important customer problems. Every customer problem can be represented as a need. The Kano Model is an insightful representation of 3 main categories of needs any product or service must address in order to survive in a competitive market.” Source : http://www.kanomodel.com/discovering-the-kano-model/ + Read more : http://www.kanomodel.com/ http://www.kanomodel.com/discovering-the-kano-model/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kano_model BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 75 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 75 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  76. 76. MINIMUM MARKETABLE FEATURES + Dermine the desiredf User Ustories for each iteration + Just make a simple listing of User Stories in order of priority + 2 concepts : Minimum marketable features Minimum viable product + Read more : http://agilesoftwareengineer.com/2013/08/28/minimum-viable-product-vs-minimum-marketable- product/ BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 76 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 76 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  77. 77. STORY MAPPING + Technique formulated by Jeff Patton in 2005 “To groom Product Backlog in such a way that “big stories” (termed as “user activities”, epics or features also) are at the top of map. These big stories are divided further into user tasks (something that someone does to reach a goal).” Source : http://www.agilebuddha.com/agile/story-mapping-andvs-process-maps/ + Read more : http://www.agilebuddha.com/agile/story-mapping- andvs-process-maps/ BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 77 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 76 in the original SBOK™ Guide. E-mail system
  78. 78. CONTINUOUS VALUE JUSTIFICATION + Check the viability of a project Expected requirements may change frequently Assess regularly Business Value to determine whether the justification of executing the project continues to exist. + Quickly adjeust to chaos created by a changing business model + Techniques : BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 78 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 76-81 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Earned Value Analysis Compare actual project performance to planned performance Read formulas pages 77 and 78 Cumulative Flow Diagram Visual representation of project progress. Great for identifying bottlenecks and redblocks Read page 79
  79. 79. CONFIRM BENEFITS REALISATION + Verifications are required to confirm that the team is creating the deliverables that will achieve the benefits and value defined at the beguinning of the project. + Determine whether the product features are adequate and suitable for customers/users needs. + Best technique is : › Prototypes, simulations, demonstrations IKIWISI : « I know it when I see it » Evaluate to what degree the team has successfully interpreted their requirements and met their expectations. BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 79 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 80 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  80. 80. « READY » AND « DONE » + Improve customer satisfaction + READY, after backlog grooming User stories are considered as READY, when no Scrum team outstanding questions remain. All issues have been trashed out. READY User Stories are candidates for the Sprint Planning + DONE : it means done  Features developed within an iteration (Sprint in Scrum), should be 100% complete by the end of the Sprint + Read more http://www.agilebuddha.com/agile/improve-sprint-throughput-with-definition- of-ready/ http://www.allaboutagile.com/agile-principle-7-done-means-done/ BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 80 Added paragraph to the original SBOK™ Guide.
  81. 81. SUMMARY OF RESPONSIBILITIES BUSINESS JUSTIFICATION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 81 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 81 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  82. 82. +QUALITY <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 82
  83. 83. OVERVIEW + Quality = Ability of the completed product or deliverables to meet the ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA and achieve the business value expected by the customer. + Scrum adopt a continuous improvement loop. › The scrum team lean from experience › Stakeholder are engaged to constantly keep the Prioritized Product backlog updated with any changes in requirements. › The Scrum Core team and stakeholders are in constant discussions. › Work is completed in increments during Sprints : errors and defects are noticed earlier through repetitive quality testing rather than when the final product or service is near completion. + Quality activities are inherent in any deliverable created › Quality-related tasks are part of the Sprint activities : testing, documentation. › Deliverables which are potentially shippable are referred to as « DONE » QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 83 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 1 to 19 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  84. 84. +In Scrum, quality is about customer satisfaction and a working product, not necessarily meeting arbitrary metrics. QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 84
  85. 85. + Based on a CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT approach › Team learns from experience › Stakeholder are engaged/committed to constantly keep the Prioritized product Backlog updated with any changes in requirements Changes of requirements reflect changes in the internal/external business environment › The team continually work and adapt to achieve the requirements + Work is completed in increments (Sprints) › Errors and defects get notice earlier through repetitive quality testing + Important quality activities : testing and documentation › Are part of the Sprint activities › DONE deliverable + Constant discussions between the Scrum Core team and the Stakeholders QUALITY IN SCRUM DEFINITION <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 85 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Ability of the completed product or deliverables to meet the Acceptance Criteria and achieve the business value expected by the customer.  Very high probability to achieve the quality expectations
  86. 86. PROJECT SCOPE & QUALITY REQUIREMENTS + Project Scope Total sum of all the product increments and the work required for developing the final product. + Project quality expectations Ability of the deliverables to meet the quality requirements for the product and satisfy customer needs QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 86 The Product Owner groom the Prioritized Product Backlog + Project Scope and quality req are captured in the Prioritized Product Backlog + Sprint scope Refining the Prioritized Product Backlog items into smaller detailed User Stories that can be planned, developped and verified. Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  87. 87. QUALITY & BUSINESS VALUE + Quality & Business value are closely linked QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 87 Map the outcomes & benefits to achieve Understand the business needs Define product requirements Business Needs Product Required Expected Business value Determines Provides Supports Supports Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  88. 88. IMPACTS ON QUALITY +Quality is decreasing when…. An increase of scope without increasing resources or time A reduction of time without decreasing the project scope +How to maintain quality over a period ? Adopt a « sustainable pace » of work The Scrum Guidance of Body defines the minimum quality requirements and standards. QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 88 QUALITY TIME RESOURCES SCOPE Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  89. 89. + The Product Owner communicates US and AC to the Scrum team members. Scrum team members agreement is sought. + The PO uses AC used at the end of each Sperint to verify the deliverables. The PO accepts or rejects deliverables. When accepted, the deliverable is DONE. ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA + Prioritized Product Backlog = Requirements document = Project Scope = Prioritized list of the product features to be delivered by the project = User Stories (US) Features are decribed in the form of User Stories User Stories are outlined by stakehoders + Acceptance Criteria (AC) Conditions that US must satisfy = Objective criteria by which a User Story is judged Acceptance Criteria are outlined by the Product Owner, according to his/her expert knowledge of customer’s requirements QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 89 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide. 2 critical issues :  Clear definition of ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  Clear definition of DONE
  90. 90. ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 90 Wish to know more ? Go and read page 87 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  91. 91. DONE STATUS +Often, the last bit of work is the most complicated part of a User Story and might take longer than expected. +No partial credit for being DONE +Why ? Time-boxed Sprints A dedicated Sprint Backlog for each Sprint +How to solve the issue ? Change the next Sprint Backlog scope to complete UN-DONE User Stories QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 91 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide. The DONE status is Black or White !
  92. 92. MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA +Could be a requirement from the Scrum Guidance Body +Could be a requirement from a Business Unit +Cascading Acceptance Criteria from Program, Portfolio to Projects +The Acceptance Criteria for a UserStory implicitely include all the minimum acceptance criteria QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 92 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  93. 93. ACTIVITIES QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 93 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Quality Planning Quality Control Quality Assurance Execution of the planned activities by the Scrum team during product development Continuous improvement Lean from each set of completed activities Lessons learned  Sprint Retrospect Meeting Verify compliance ProductOwner monitors and evaluate quality assurance activities Prioritize UserStories Develop first the functionnality with the highest priority Define acceptance criteria Maintain a sustainable pace employee satisfaction, stability and increased accuracy estimation Define READY and DONE criteria Continuous Integration & Autmated product testing Scrum Guidance Body define the processes and documents of refernce
  94. 94. CAUSES OF TECHNICAL DEBT + Technical debt › Design debt or code debt › Refers to the work that teams prioritize lower, omit, or do not complete as they work toward creating the primary deliverables associated with the project’s product. Technical debt accrues and must be paid in the future. QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 94 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide. + Some causes of technical debt can include the following: › Quick-fix and building deliverables that do not comply with standards for quality, security, long-term architecture goals, etc. › Inadequate or incomplete testing › Improper or incomplete documentation › Lack of coordination among different team members, or if different Scrum Teams start working in isolation, with less focus on final integration of components required to make a project or program successful › Poor sharing of business knowledge and process knowledge among the stakeholders and project teams › Too much focus on short-term project goals instead of the long-term objectives of the company.
  95. 95. PDCA CYCLE + Deming or Shewhart cycle + Deming philosophy : Management guidelines define quality. When management is able to provide a conducive environment and is able to motivate its employees to improve quality on a continuous basis, each employee will be able to make a contribution toward a superior quality product QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 95 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  96. 96. SUMMARY OF RESPONSIBILITIES QUALITY IN SCRUM <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 96 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 83-96 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  97. 97. +CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 97
  98. 98. BASICS : CHANGE IS INEVITABLE + « Responding to a change over following a plan » Agile Manifesto Very usefull for complex projects with a lot of uncertainty + Every project is exposed to change. Stakeholders change their mind in the project course about what they need, what they want. Stakeholders cannot define all requirements during project initiation. + Team members have to embrasse change Development projects welcome change by using small development cycles (=SPRINT) SPRINTs incorporate stekaholder feedback on project deliverables after earch SPRINT. Stakeholder can change requirements earlier in the development cycle. + Organisation should maximize benefits from changes and minimize negative impacts through diligent change management processes. Turn change into a competitive advantage. CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 98 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  99. 99. APPROVING CHANGE REQUESTS + Define a process to approve change requests Change requested remain unapproved until they get formaly approved. + Define responsibilities and tolerance levels The product owner plays a very important role in managing changes. Small changes without no significant impact are approved by the Product Owner. Statistics : 90% of changes should be approved by the Product Owner Major changes are escalated to senior managers : sponsor, portfolio or program product owner, chief product owner…. CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 99 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  100. 100. APPROVING CHANGE REQUESTS + Update Prioritized Product Backlog with Approved Changes CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 100 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  101. 101. BALANCING FLEXIBILITY & STABILITY + Find the right balance In the same way that extreme rigidity is ineffective, extreme flexibility is also unproductive CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 101 Flexibility • Change requests are created, approved and incorportated in the Product Backlog Stability • The Sprint backlog is fixed : all requirements related to an ongoing Sprint are frozen during the Sprint. Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  102. 102. RAISE CHANGE REQUESTS + Stakeholders CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 102 + Scrum Core team Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  103. 103. CHANGES HAVING A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE CURRENT SPRINT + The scope of a Sprint cannot be changed once the Sprint begins. + In case of a Change Request having a significant impact on a Sprint in progress The Product Owner consults the relevant stakeholders + Wait or cancel If the required change is so important that the results of the Sprint would be worthless without it, then the Sprint should be terminated. If not, then the change is incorporated into a later Sprint CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 103 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  104. 104. DETERMINING THE LENGHT OF A SPRINT +Few changes Sprint lenght is 4-6 weeks +Many changes Sprint lenght can be 1-2 weeks CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 104 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  105. 105. CHANGE IN PORTFOLIOS AND PROGRAMS +Cascading effect on all dependent projects or Sprints CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 105 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  106. 106. SUMMARY OF RESPONSIBILITIES CHANGE <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 106 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 97-116 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  107. 107. +RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 107
  108. 108. +Uncertain event that can affect the objectives of a project and may contribute to its success or failure. DEFINITION RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 108 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 117-131 in the original SBOK™ Guide. +Manage risks Proactively Iterative process througout the project life Standardized steps to identify and assess risks +At least, 2 factors Probability of occurrence Probable impact of the event +Risk ≠ Issue Risk Issue Uncertainty Certainty
  109. 109. RISK ATTITUDE +Understand the risk attitude of Stakeholders › 1. Risk appetite How much uncertainty the stakeholder or organization is willing to take on. › 2. Risk tolerance Degree, amount, or volume of risk stakeholders will withstand. › 3. Risk threshold Level at which a risk is acceptable to the stakeholder organization. A risk will fall above or below the risk threshold. If it is below, then the stakeholder or organization is more likely to accept the risk. RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 109 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 117-131 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  110. 110. UTILITY FUNCTION +“Utility function” model Risk averse Risk neutral Risk seeking Have a look at : › ftp://cramton.umd.edu/econ300/13-risk-theory.pdf › http://www.policonomics.com/lp-risk-and-uncertainty2-risk-aversion/ › Google search : Risk + Utility Function RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 110 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 117-131 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  111. 111. RISK MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 111 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 117-131 in the original SBOK™ Guide. Identification Assessment Priorization Mitigation Communication Techniques • Review lessons learned • Risk checklists • Prompt lists • Brainstorming • Risk Breakdown structure • Probability = Asses risk likelywood • Proximity = When the risk could occur • Impact = Probable effect • Techniques • Risk meeting • Probability trees • Pareto analysis • Probability Impact grid • Expected monetary value Update the Prioritized Product Backlog with identified risks : • Create a list of prioritized risks • Select risks that can be mitigated • Combine list of US with prioitized risks Communicate risks to stakeholders Use « Risk burndown chart » • The response to each risk according its impact and probability • Proactive or reactive • Severe risks are mitigated
  112. 112. RISK PRIORIZATION RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 112 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 117-131 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  113. 113. RISK BURNDOWN CHART +To assess trends in risk exposure and take appropriate action as necessary RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 113 Wish to know more ? Go and read pages 117-131 in the original SBOK™ Guide.
  114. 114. HOW TO MINIMIZE RISKS WITH SCRUM ? + Flexibility reduces business-environment- related risk Adding or modifying requirements at any time in the project lifecycle. This enables the organization to respond to threats or opportunities from the business environment and unforeseen requirements whenever they arise, with usually low cost of managing such risks + Regular feedback reduces expectations- related risk RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 114 + Team ownership reduces estimation risk Leads to more accurate estimation and timely delivery of product increments + Transparency reduces non-detection risk Risks are detected and communicated early + Iterative delivery reduces investment risk Potentially shippable deliverables are created after every Sprint, reduces investment risk for the customer
  115. 115. RISK IN PORTFOLIO & PROGRAM RISK <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 115 +Risks related to portfolio or programs may have an impact on projects
  116. 116. WE BREATHE, TALK AND LIVE INNOVATION 24/7 LIKE & FOLLOW US! CONTACT SQLI Enterprise Lyon 1 place Verrazzano Tel : +33 4 72 40 53 53 Consultant : Christine Dessus : 06 79 87 79 30 Frank Ortega : 06 12 57 55 93 <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 116
  117. 117. About SQLI Enterprise: specializing in consulting and technological innovation, SQLI Enterprise is the partner of reference in the digital transformation of businesses: cooperation between professions/IT, architectures of the future, and cutting-edge expertise in innovative technologies are used for collaborative purposes and the digitalization of processes and services. SQLI Enterprise is working towards creating a genuine digital strike force: setting up large-scale digital industrialization ‘factories’ which combine quality, innovation and flexibility, the design of upgradeable cross-channel platforms, and advice and solutions on big data, mobile technologies and connected devices. Its 1200 staff are located in France (Paris, Lyon, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Rouen, Nantes, Lille), Switzerland (Lausanne, Geneva), in Belgium (Ghent, Brussels), Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Morocco (Rabat, Oujda). + Immeuble le Pressensé 268 Avenue du Président Wilson 93210 La Plaine Saint-Denis Tél: 01 55 93 26 00 / Fax: 01 55 93 26 01 + www.sqli.com + Intellectual Property Rights Reproductions (on paper or computer support) of this document and of works integrated into it are authorized on condition that they are reserved strictly for personal use, excluding all use for advertising and/or commercial purposes, and on condition that they are in conformity with the provisions of article L122-5 of the French Intellectual Property Code and provided that no notices concerning its ownership are removed. In consequence, any representation, utilization, adaptation, modification, incorporation, translation, commercialization, partial or integral by whatever procedure or on whatever medium that may be (paper, digital) is expressly forbidden, without the advanced written authorization of SQLI, besides the exceptions endorsed in the article L 122.5 of the French Intellectual Property Code, under the pain of constituting a breach in the copyrights of the author and/or of designs and models and/or of trademark, punished by article L335-2 and subsequent articles of the French intellectual property Code. SQLI GROUP <V1.0> - <January 2016>© SQLI Enterprise – SQLI GROUP | 2015 117
  118. 118. Digital performance. LE PARTENAIRE DE RÉFÉRENCE DES ENTREPRISES DANS LA DÉFINITION, LA MISE EN ŒUVRE ET LE PILOTAGE DE LEUR TRANSFORMATION DIGITALE
  119. 119. GROUPE EUROPÉEN DE CONSEIL EN MARKETING & TECHNOLOGIES SQLI, LEADER DIGITAL PERFORMANCE + SQLI accompagne 30 entreprises du CAC 40: + Côté NYSE Euronext Paris (SQI) 162M€ EN 2014 80%DE NOS CLIENTS RECOMMANDENT SQLI 2000PASSIONNÉS Suisse Belgique Luxembourg Pays-Bas Maroc 18AGENCES 7 A L’INTERNATIONAL 11 EN FRANCE
  120. 120. CRÉATEUR DE PERFORMANCE DIGITALE
  121. 121. MARKETING & TECHNOLOGIE, LA RENCONTRE + Conseil Business & IT + Innovation technologique + Solutions collaboratives + Solutions E-commerce CRM BI + Mobilité et objets connectés + Externalisation + Stratégie digitale + Marketing relationnel (data, CRM) + UX & design + Achat Media + Search & analytics + Social media + Programmes de fidélisation DIGITAL THAT WORKS! DIGITAL THAT SELLS. AND BEYOND.
  122. 122. 122 Du digital au réel Ventes en ligne en Europe 2014 - 2019 x2 d’objets connectés d’ici 2018 ! 80 milliards De gains de productivité avec les usages et solutions collaboratives en entreprise 25% NOUVELLE ÈRE
  123. 123. CRÉER UN PARCOURS CLIENT UNIFIÉ NÉCESSITE UNE RÉVOLUTION VOTRE EXPÉRIENCE CLIENT EST ELLE ATTRACTIVE ? Finances/Achats Supply chain Opérations RH LES TECHNOLOGIES SONT-ELLES UN ACCÉLÉRATEUR POUR VOS MÉTIERS ? Gouvernance Digitale Innovation Collaboration Centres de services VOTRE ORGANISATION EST-ELLE AGILE ? Apple, Nespresso, les leaders ont réussi leur transformation globale… 123
  124. 124. 124 Nous digitalisons VOTRE MARQUE, VOSVENTES, VOS SERVICES Nous sommes le partenaire de votre Transformation Digitale
  125. 125. © SQLI GROUP | 2015 125 SOCIAL Le client et l’employé au centre MARKETING Engagement client et fidélisation ANALYTICS Big Data, data marketing au service du business MOBILE Stratégie et industrialisation mobile COMMERCE Accélération des ventes cross-canal NOTRE CRÉDO 5 BATAILLES À GAGNER VOTRE STRATÉGIE
  126. 126. 126 NESPRESSO INTERNATIONAL - COMMERCE FACTORY Nous propulsons le programme international Nespresso, pour un service et une expérience d’excellence, “pixel perfect” What else? NOUS ACCÉLÉRONS LES VENTES EN LIGNE
  127. 127. 127 AIRBUS HELICOPTERS E-COMMERCE FACTORY INTERNATIONALE Nous avons créé le nouveau service de commande de pièces d’hélicoptères en ligne, disponible pour 2 000 clients d’Airbus Helicopters – numéro 1 mondial de l’industrie des hélicoptères civils. NOUS CONNECTONS LES ACTEURS B2B
  128. 128. NOUS CRÉONS DES EXPÉRIENCES ENGAGEANTES 128 CANDEREL SOCIAL MARKETING + 16 000 joueurs + 50 % sont devenus membres du club + 5 200 e-vouchers imprimés + 4 600 nouveaux fans In brands we trust
  129. 129. 129 NOUS METTONS LES DONNÉES AU SERVICE DE VOS VENTES AIRBUS BIG DATA POUR DÉTECTER LES OPPORTUNITÉS + Études de rentabilité des lignes commerciales par combinaison de données hétérogènes + 200 analystes utilisateurs + 5 milliards d’enregistrements
  130. 130. 130 TARKETT PERFORMANCE DES VENTES B2B Nous digitalisons vos processus de vente et créons l’adhésion des forces commerciales avec une solution mobile user friendly. NOUS DIGITALISONS VOS FORCES DE VENTES
  131. 131. NOUS ACCÉLÉRONS LA COLLABORATION 131 SANOFI PASTEUR SP-MSD COMMUNICATIONS INTERNATIONALES + Un intranet européen unifié + 19 pays, 1 100 utilisateurs + MS Sharepoint 2013 « SQLI nous a semblé être le meilleur partenaire pour nous accompagner et sa maîtrise des projets complexes et innovants s'est avérée. » a dit N. Seimandi, CIO.
  132. 132. NOUS CRÉONSVOS SERVICES MOBILES 132 AIRBUS FLIGHT FOLIO Un usage original des tablettes pour optimiser l’échange d’informations entre pilotes et équipes techniques. Planning des pilotes sur iPad. Information technique partagée (délais, incidents, achats carburants, etc.).
  133. 133. NOUS INNOVONS, NOUS INSPIRONS 133 VAL D’ISÈRE HACKATHON AUGMENTED SKIING Nous révolutionnons l’expérience client + 1 week-end, 1 POC, 1 gagnant + Gamification, marketing viral & objets connectés pour une forte attractivité Awards We have a Lab Follow the geeks
  134. 134. NOUS INDUSTRIALISONS LE DIGITAL DANS NOS CENTRES DE SERVICES 134 RTE CENTRE DE SERVICES AGILE QUALITÉ – AGILITÉ - INNOVATION + Approche sur mesure de l’acquisition + Reprise initiale de 60 applications + CMMI – Centre de Bordeaux + Java – Microsoft - Mobilité + Haute flexibilité de 10 000 à 30 000 jours-homme par an - 5 ans
  135. 135. NOUS AGILISONS LES ORGANISATIONS 135 BNPP WEALTH MANAGEMENT COACHING AGILE + SCRUM, XP, Innovation Game, définition des processus + CMMI + Collaboration offshore France / Singapour + Formation et coaching depuis 4 ans
  136. 136. RÉVÉLATEURS DE NOUVEAUX USAGES NOTRE ADN 136 Augmented banking La banque au cœur de la vie digitale, Une expérience personnalisée inédite AirBnB Hausse des réservations : + 32 % par l’optimisation des investissements marketing PASSIONNÉS D’ INNOVATION CRÉATEURS DE PERFORMANCE Le Lab Design de service & innovation technologique pour la création de nouveaux services & produits
  137. 137. NOTRE CULTURE DU PARTAGE 137 TENDANCES POINTS DE VUEINNOVATION
  138. 138. POURQUOI NOUS 138 NOUS AVONS 1ère agence intégrée UX & marketing >100 consultants métier & IT Un lab innovation 2 % de notre chiffre d’affaires sont réinvestis en R&D chaque année 1er intégrateur Hybris en EMEA L’unique partenaire certifié dans ces 3 environnements : Hybris, SAP et Open Text MICROSOFT 1er partenaire digital - des solutions marketing aux applications métier dans le cloud > 300 formations techniques Nous sommes des spécialistes de l’outsourcing (20 % de notre CA) Une méthodologie unique CMMI & AGILE Qualité ISO 9001:2008 (Toulouse, Rabat) NOUS MAÎTRISONS NOUS MAÎTRISONS LES TECHNOLOGIE S LES PROJETSLES IDÉES
  139. 139. CE QUE NOUS PROPOSONS BOOSTER VOTRE MARQUE ET VOS VENTES COMMERCE CONNECTÉ + Marketing personnalisé + Plateformes e-commerce + Connected showroom + Délégation e-commerce MARKETING, CRM & DATA + Marketing & UX + Acquisition, programmes fidélisation + Branding & social marketing + CRM et marketing automation + Data intelligence DÉVELOPPER L’AGILITÉ DE VOTRE ENTREPRISE INDUSTRIALISATION + Stratégie d’externalisation + Digital factories & centres de services + Management applicatif MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATION + Gouvernance Digital Runner + Lab Innovation + Conseil metier & IT + Agilité & lean management + Formation DIGITALISER VOS PROCESSUS ET SYSTÈMES BUSINESS SOLUTIONS + Solutions collaboratives + Digitalisation des services + Solutions achats & finance + Enterprise Assets Management + BI & analytics MOBILITÉ & OBJETS CONNECTÉS + Stratégie cross-canal + Usages mobiles & technologies + Innovation IoT + Mobile factory 139
  140. 140. LIKE & FOLLOW US! Digital that works. WWW.SQLI-ENTERPRISE.COM

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