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Bringing Gamification into your Training

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Bringing Gamification into your Training

  1. 1. Gamification in the Classroom Pointers for Training Professionals Charles Palmer Harrisburg University
  2. 2. Gamificationthe concept of applying game-design thinking tonon-game applications to make them more funand engaging
  3. 3. Some non-classroom examples…
  4. 4. Examples…
  5. 5. EducationalExamples…
  6. 6. EducationalExamples…
  7. 7. Some facts…• 2011 Gartner Research Report it is estimated that by 2015, more than 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will gamify those processes.• The trend has been picking up major Al Gore talks about how "Games are the new normal" and the power of momentum over the last year and has Gamification at the 2011 Games for Change Festival. gained support from industry heavy weights such as Bing Gordon, Al Gore, J.P. Rangaswami, Chief Scientist of Salesforce.com, and many more.
  8. 8. Gamification Loyalty Programs (redemption) Behavioral Game Design Economics (engagement)(status/reputation)
  9. 9. Player Types KillersAchievers Explorers Socializers •prefer to gain •players who prefer •gain the most •thrive on "points," levels, discovering areas, enjoyment by competition with equipment and creating maps and interacting with other players, and other concrete learning about other players, and prefer fighting them measurements hidden places on some occasions, to scripted computer-controlled computer-controlled •go to great lengths •feel restricted when characters with opponents to achieve rewards expected to move on personality that confer them in a certain time little or no gameplay frame, as that does •The game is merely benefit simply for not allow them to a tool they use to the prestige of look around at their meet others in-game having it. own pace. or outside of it •find joy in discovering an unknown glitch or a hidden easter egg.
  10. 10. Achievers 47 Explorers 67 SocializersESAK Player Types 53 Killers 33
  11. 11. Player Types KillersAchievers Explorers Socializers •prefer to gain •players who prefer •gain the most •thrive on "points," levels, discovering areas, enjoyment by competition with equipment and creating maps and interacting with other players, and other concrete learning about other players, and prefer fighting them measurements hidden places on some occasions, to scripted computer-controlled computer-controlled •go to great lengths •feel restricted when characters with opponents to achieve rewards expected to move on personality that confer them in a certain time little or no gameplay frame, as that does •The game is merely benefit simply for not allow them to a tool they use to the prestige of look around at their meet others in-game having it. own pace. or outside of it •find joy in discovering an unknown glitch or a hidden easter egg.
  12. 12. Gamification Loop Challenges status Game Play Point system Social Win/Lossnetworking conditions badges leaderboards
  13. 13. But wait…• Creating these types of games is hard work (so what else is new)• Just adding points and badges doesn’t make something fun and an improperly balanced reward system will negatively effect the behavior you are trying to address.• The true magic happens when a player succeed in a challenge which Too frustrating seemed (or was) daunting and beyond their skill level.• Players are motivated by different Too easy things. So we have to consider different experiences for varying player types*
  14. 14. “Do people not do something because they are not able to? – then increase ease of use.Do people not do it because they have no free time? – then work on that. Only if motivation is the issue cangamificaion be a [legitimate] way [of influencing behaviour” - Sebastian Deterding, research
  15. 15. Gamification Loop Challenges status Game Play Point system Social Win/Lossnetworking conditions badges leaderboards
  16. 16. Game Play Mechanics Community Discovery EPIC Meaning Free LunchCollaboration Infinite Loss Aversion Lottery Momentum Ownership Gameplay Blissful UrgentAppointments Status Virality Productivity Optimism Cascading Combos Achievements Levels Information Reward Countdown Quests Points Schedules
  17. 17. Game Play Mechanics CommunityCollaboration Discovery Behavior EPIC Meaning Free Lunch Infinite Loss Aversion Lottery Momentum Ownership Gameplay Blissful UrgentAppointments Status Virality Productivity Optimism Cascading Feedback Information Combos Achievements Levels Reward Countdown Quests Schedules Points Progression
  18. 18. More examples…
  19. 19. Six rules…1. Understand what constitutes a “win” for the player and organization2. Expose the player’s intrinsic motivation and progress to mastery3. Design for the emotional human, not the rational human
  20. 20. Six rules…4. Develop scalable, meaningful intrinsic and extrinsic rewards5. Use on of the leading platform vendors to scale your project6. Most interactions are boring, make everything a little more fun
  21. 21. “In some ways it is a fad – adding points and badges in tacky ways, looking at ‘gamification’ as an easy way to make boring things seem interesting – that is a fad. However, the idea of designing businessprocesses so that those who engage in them findthem more intrinsically rewarding – that is a long term trend.” - Jesse Schell, CEO Schell Games
  22. 22. Resources• Vendors – Bunchball, Badgeville, BigDoor, Rypple, DueProps, SCVNGR, CrowdTwist
  23. 23. Resources• PearlTrees - http://bit.ly/IhdQod• Jesse Schell – The Pleasure Revolution http://bit.ly/J15rbp• Gabe Zimmerman - http://bit.ly/IUiWFZ• Gamification.org/wiki• Concept of “Flow” by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - bit.ly/conceptofflow

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