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Small scale

  1. 1. Shane Meadows and the revival of the kitchen sink dramaCharlie Hopwood
  2. 2. For my secondary research, I visited the BFI library.When there I gained information for my films This isEngland and Twenty Four Seven. The information Icollected were of magazine articles and interviewswith Shane Meadows. These mainly come from theSight and Sound magazine. This was helping as Igained extra understanding of why he made the filmsand how he was inspired when making them. I alsolooked a book that gave me information on ShaneMeadows and many of the films he has previouslymade.
  3. 3. Kitchen Sink dramas started in the late 5os early 60s. Thiswas used in art, theatre, television and film.Kitchen Sink dramas or realism was a British culturalmovement that depicted heroes as angry young men. Thesedramas mainly focused on the working class side to Britishlife. It see them look at individuals whod spend all their timein pubs; seeing their side to social and political controversies.
  4. 4. The films I have chosen are: Saturday Night-SundayThis is England Morning Twenty Four Seven
  5. 5. The film I have chosen as my focus film is Shane Meadows- This is England.The reason I have chosen this film is because itperfectly shows the Kitchen Sink Dramas idea ofangry young men. This films is set in the 80smidland, around the time of skinheads. For some,skinheads were racist; though to other people thesecould be seen as Heroes.This film is about a 12 year old boy who has not had agood child hood. He meets a group of young skinheads that let him into their group. When the returnof Gumbo (Stephen Graham) things in the groupchange. He must decide to stay out of trouble, orhelp honor his fathers name with what he thinks isright.The scene I am showing you helps show the idea ofangry young men as heroes.
  6. 6. The reason for the choice of this film is becauseit’s a classic well known Kitchen sink drama. I’musing this to help compare my other focus filmsto see the similarities and differences.The scene I have chosen to look at is called‘Whatever people say I am, I am not’. This is theperfect example to use as it shows everything allat once about Kitchen sink dramas.This film is about an angry young man who isin two relationships, but one being with amarried women who he has got pregnant.He’s only escape is getting down to the pub ona Saturday night for a beer. With mistakesfrom his actions, he must get money to helpget out of trouble.
  7. 7. My other supporting film is Shane Meadows- Twenty Four Seven. This was chosen to help me compare with my other 2 chosen films. This film is different to Shane Meadows other film as it is filmed in black and white. This could be an indication on Shane Meadows and his ideas on Kitchen Sink dramas. What helps support this is that the film is about young men using boxing to help get out of trouble. The idea of angry young men can be seen here too.This film is about a man that decides to openup his own boxing gym to help youngindividuals stay out of trouble and put theiranger into something else.
  8. 8. One scene I have chosen to look at in twenty four seven is theballroom dance scene. This has been regarded as a key scenewhen comparing Shane Meadows films with British New Wave.There is a a piece of information in one of my gatherings thathelps suggests that this could be related to British New Wave.‘Picking up the baton: Meadows and the continuing tradition ofBritish Art cinema’
  9. 9. The specific scene for This is England is whenCombo and the rest of the group go to a skinhead meeting. I am also looking at the scenewhere Combo beats up Milky. These scenes areuseful because they help show the British newwave idea on what life was like for youngworking class men.

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