Advertising techniques

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Advertising techniques

  1. 1. Advertising Techniques Beauty Appeal Celebrity Endorsement Escape With most beauty adverts, they use people that are very attractive, and then they will airbrush the photos to make the models look even better, they do this because it makes the audience believe that the product that is on the advert can make you look like the model using the product, making them want to buy the product. These kinds of adverts use celebrities, this is because it makes the consumers believe that celebrities use the product that is being advertised, making the audience want to buy the product. It also makes the audience trust the celebrity that the product is at a good quality.
  2. 2. Independence/Individuality Intelligence This advert is trying to sell you a holiday, they do this by teasing you with pictures of a sunny, peaceful place and they will normally say something like “why are you looking out of your window seeing rain and thunder when you can come to a place like this?” this makes you want to go there even more. With this advert, they make you feel like an individual, this makes you think you are important and special. . These adverts imply that a smart person would buy the advertised product. It can also imply that the advertised product will make you smart if you buy and use it.
  3. 3. Lifestyle Nurture Peer Approval With these averts they advertise the product to make it look like the product has to be a part of your lifestyle to fit in with the crowd. The nurture technique mostly relates to older people and parents because of their parental instincts. It forces them to feel the need to look after people and take care of them, or help them in some way that it benefits them. Some adverts that make people feel this way are the NSPCC or RSPCA advertisements. These capture the attention of the viewers because sometimes they are graphic and you see the reality of what children and animals go through.
  4. 4. Rebel Rhetorical Question Peer approval is a technique used to make the audience feel that in order to be 'cool' and accepted by your peers, you must buy the product. This technique although effective can be used negatively, peer approval can make people, and particularly teenagers worry that they will not be accepted if they do not have this product. This technique makes the audience associate the advertised product with rebelling against mainstream products and lifestyle choices, even if the product is mainstream. Skoda used rebel to advertise their new car, previously Skoda made an advert where people were making the Skoda car out of cake. Skoda's new car, which is 'made of meaner stuff’ was, made out of things like snake venom and other nasty things. This new car presents the idea of rebelling against the idea of a 'nice' car.
  5. 5. Scientific / Statistical Claim Unfinished Comparison / Claim Adverts like this use rhetorical questions because they are trying to make you feel sad and guilty for what is being advertised, adverts like this are mainly charities and animal sponsors. Scientific/factual adverts like this tell you how well it is, they give you mathematic and scientific facts to make you believe them. These adverts claim that their product is the better than any other product, but they don’t give us any facts to support their ‘claim’.
  6. 6. Scientific / Statistical Claim Unfinished Comparison / Claim Adverts like this use rhetorical questions because they are trying to make you feel sad and guilty for what is being advertised, adverts like this are mainly charities and animal sponsors. Scientific/factual adverts like this tell you how well it is, they give you mathematic and scientific facts to make you believe them. These adverts claim that their product is the better than any other product, but they don’t give us any facts to support their ‘claim’.

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