Agricultural Institutes         And Policy Framework                C.M.K. Liyanage                AG/2009/2786
Table of Contents                                                            Page1. Introduction                          ...
Introduction        “Agricultural Institutes and its Policy Framework” is a wide topic which touches theseveral different ...
Mandate   •   To provide a sound scientific basis for the sustainable development of the Coconut       Industry in Sri Lan...
Policy framework    •      Increase productivity to potential levels of the crop.    •      Increase national production o...
Sri Lanka Council for Agricultural Research Policy                                             (CARP)The Sri Lanka Council...
Goals   •   Strengthen and consolidate the national agricultural research system   •    Planning, funding, coordination an...
autonomous institution designed to promote policy-oriented economic research and tostrengthen the capacity for medium-term...
Rice Research and Development Institute                                            RRDI       Rice Research and Developmen...
tuber crops and floriculture. The research programme focuses on the development ofimproved crop varieties, new propagation...
Fruit Crops Research and Development Centre        The Fruit Crops Research and Development Center was established in Octo...
Field Crops Research and Development Institute                                        FCRDIPolicy frameworkVision of FCRDI...
1. Development of high yielding improved varieties of other field crops, dry zone      vegetables and fruits suitable for ...
CIC Agri Businesses       The only SEED to SHELF Agriculture company in Sri Lanka that manages over10,000 Acres of it’s ow...
To provide innovative technologies and professional management to the agriculture sectorcontributing significantly to Sri ...
•    Upgrade the infrastructure of rural schools and to develop the skills and knowledge of        the rural students   • ...
•   To liaise closely with planners and policy makers in the government, business and      research communities;  •   To m...
Referenceshttp://www.iwmi.cgiar.org/index.aspxhttp://www.rrisl.lk/index.htmlhttp://www.cri.lk/index.htmlhttp://www.slcarp....
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Agicultural Istitutions of Sri Lanka

  1. 1. Agricultural Institutes And Policy Framework C.M.K. Liyanage AG/2009/2786
  2. 2. Table of Contents Page1. Introduction 032. Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka 033. Rubber Research Institute of Sri Lanka 044. Sri Lanka Council for Agricultural Research Policy 065. Institute of policy studies of Sri Lanka 076. Rice research and development institute 097. Horticultural crop research and development institute 098. Fruit crop research and development center 119. Field crop research and development institute 1210. Grain Legume and oil crop research and development center 1211. School of Agriculture 1312. CIC Agri Business 1413. CIC Humanity service foundation 1514. Hector Kobbakaduwa Agrarian research and training institute 1715.Reference 18 2
  3. 3. Introduction “Agricultural Institutes and its Policy Framework” is a wide topic which touches theseveral different areas such as Government Agricultural institutes, Private sector’s institutes,Agricultural based companies, Non government organizations, Research institutes and theirpolicy framework. It is difficult to give clear definition for the agriculture institutes. Some of aboveinstitutions are profit oriented and several institutions are not profit based. In this report I’m trying to give some brief information about Agricultural Institutesand its Policy Framework in Sri Lanka. Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka CRISL The Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka (CRISL) was initially established as theCoconut Research Scheme in 1928, and was later developed into a fully fledged nationalresearch organization and a centre of excellence in coconut research and development in Asiaand the Pacific Region. It is the first ever Research Institute established in the world devotedfor coconut. The Institute promotes collaborative research with other National Institutes andPrivate Sector Organizations. The Research Programmes take an integrated approach througheight research Divisions. Policy frameworkVisionOur vision is to be the center of excellence in coconut research, and generate innovativetechnology and technology transfer to meet the challenges of the coconut industry.MissionOur mission is to generate knowledge and technology through excellence in research towardsincreasing productivity and profitability of coconut. In the pursuit of this mission weendeavour, to nurture motivate our staff to excel. 3
  4. 4. Mandate • To provide a sound scientific basis for the sustainable development of the Coconut Industry in Sri Lanka • Develop appropriate technologies in crop production, and post harvest processing through strategic, basic and applied research • Act as national repository for genetic resources, quality seed nuts and improved varieties • Develop environmentally and ecologically sound coconut-based farming systems • Transfer technologies developed by the CRI Rubber Research Institute of Sri Lanka RRISL The origin of research on rubber goes back to 1909, when a group of planters in theKalutara District met and agreed to engage a Chemist to study the coagulation of rubber. Thiswas later expanded to form a Rubber Research Scheme in 1913, with 60% Government fundsand the balance came from private subscribers. The Rubber Research Ordinance was incorporated on the 30th August 1930 and thelaboratories of the scheme were moved to its present location at Dartonfield, Agalawatte, in1936. The Rubber Research Scheme was named the Rubber Research Institute of Ceylon(now Sri Lanka) in 1951, by an amendment of the original Act of Parliament. This shows thatthe Rubber Research Institute of Sri Lanka (RRISL) is the oldest Research Institute on rubberin the world. It has a proud record of service to the industry by developing technologies inplant breeding, agro-management practices and chemistry of raw rubber. According to the Rubber Research Ordinance a Rubber Research Board is establishedfor the purpose of furthering and developing the rubber industry. The Board governs theRRISL with the view of managing, conducting, encouraging and promoting scientificresearch in respect of rubber cultivation, processing, product manufacture and all problemsconnected with the rubber industry. 4
  5. 5. Policy framework • Increase productivity to potential levels of the crop. • Increase national production of NR to meet the increasing demand. • Optimal and sustainable utilization of land, labour and other resources. • Maximize domestic value addition to rubber • Encourage individual competency and self development of RRISL personnel, and in the process, improve the organizational effectiveness of the institute. • Transfer the developed technologies through training and advisory services.Figure 1 • Offers around 15 promising clones, developed by Sri Lankan Scientists with more than five fold yields compared to the productivity of rubber trees in their original habitat. • Soil and foliar analysis for site specific fertilizer recommendations. • A special diagnostic team for trouble shooting in agricultural practices and raw rubber processing aspects. • Planting materials from latest clone introductions to establish source bush nurseries and issue quality certification of all planting materials issued to stakeholders. • Plant protection systems for all maladies of the rubber tree and provide early warning on disease epidemics and advice on mitigating unforeseen disasters. • Testing quality of waste water, dry rubber, latex, latex products, rubber compounds and fertilizer, and issue certificates recognized by local authorities. • Training in all aspects of rubber cultivation, post harvest technology, and plantation management. • An extension wing to assist the rubber cultivation and processing in smallholder sector. • Guidance to solve and manage environmental issues connected with discharge of wastewater generating from raw rubber, latex processing and rubber product manufacturing industries in Sri Lanka. • Development of value added natural rubber based materials and also rubber compounds for latex and dry rubber products to suit the end user requirements or in compliance with the standard specifications. • Project feasibility and planning studies, designs, plans for setting up of raw rubber and latex processing industries. 5
  6. 6. Sri Lanka Council for Agricultural Research Policy (CARP)The Sri Lanka Council for Agricultural Research Policy (SLCARP) was established on the22nd of December 1987 with the enactment of the CARP Act No. 47 of 1987. It is located inColombo, the commercial capital of Sri Lanka.VisionTo develop a vibrant, effective and sustainable system of agricultural research promotingsocio-economic development in Sri LankaMissionTo strengthen and mobilize research capabilities of the National Agricultural ResearchSystem (NARS), Universities, Private Sector and other stakeholders in Partnership in thegeneration and dissemination of appropriate technologies and information for thedevelopment of Agricultural sector. Policy framework Mandated Functions • Formulation of a National Agricultural Research Policy • Organization, Coordination, Planning and execution of agricultural research • Allocating/generating funds for contract research, monitoring and evaluation, technology dissemination. • Develop human resources (scientific & Technical) in the agricultural sector • Foster regional/international linkages to access modern technology, information, exchange of scientific staff, germplasm, etc. • Disseminate technology and scientific information for agricultural scientists, farmers, private sector and other stakeholders. • Periodic review performance on agricultural research projects, institutions and divisions • Repository of scientific information on agriculture and related fields • Provide excellence in agricultural research 6
  7. 7. Goals • Strengthen and consolidate the national agricultural research system • Planning, funding, coordination and monitoring of competitive contract research grants • Client oriented appropriate technology dissemination • Documentation and research information transfer to stakeholders • Improved administration and finance set-up for supporting research Objectives • Identification of sub-sectoral policy perspectives and formulation of agricultural research policy • Research planning-priority setting in key disciplines • Sustainability of funding for high priority research areas- Establishment of Competitive Research Grants Program • Development of suitable mechanisms for research monitoring and evaluation • Facilitate linkages with public/private sector organizations, universities, regional and international research institutes/agencies and CG centers • Stakeholder information dissemination on appropriate technologies generated • Widen and strengthen the scope of agricultural database and CARP electronic library • To achieve financial and administrative targets Institute of policy studies of Sri Lanka IPS IPS is the apex economic policy research institute in Sri Lanka, recognized as aregional centre of excellence offering an authoritative and independent voice on economicpolicy analysis. The Institute of Policy Studies (IPS) was conceived in the mid-1980s as an 7
  8. 8. autonomous institution designed to promote policy-oriented economic research and tostrengthen the capacity for medium-term policy analysis in Sri Lanka. IPS has acquired aunique position as an authoritative independent voice in economic policy analysis, workingclosely with the government, private sector, academia and civil society.Policy framework • To be a regional centre of excellence in the analysis of socio-economic policy issues. • To be a source of technical expertise and policy advice for the wider region outside of Sri Lanka. • To engage in dialogue with policy makers in the government, labour, donor, business, and research communities and provide a forum for the discussion, exchange, and assessment of views amongst stakeholders. • To be a point of reference on national policy issues to the public by providing an independent and authoritative voice. • To strengthen the national capacity for medium and long-term economic policy analysis by investing in the capabilities of its staff and the Institutes knowledge base. • To promote equality of opportunities for all in all its research and activities, regardless of gender, age or ethnicity. • To strengthen the countrys access to the highest quality expertise available by building and managing linkages with international institutions and scholars concerned with relevant issues.Agricultural Economic Policy Unit of IPS The primary focus of the Agricultural Economic Policy Unit of IPS is analyeingpolicy pertaining to the development of these sectors in the economy. In particular, the Unitsresearch programme focuses on issues of employment generation, export competitiveness,industrial and labour relations, environmental effects, and local skills development.The Agricultural Economic Policy Unit recognizes that a blinkered fixation with agriculturalpolicy is unrealistic as it will be insufficient to increase investment and make significantinroads into rural poverty. There is, therefore, a natural link at the strategic level with otherthemes presented in the IPS research programme. Nevertheless, the point of entry for theUnits research agenda is through rural concerns, looking first at peasant sector developmentand then at the plantation sector. 8
  9. 9. Rice Research and Development Institute RRDI Rice Research and Development Institute (RRDI) continues to play a major role inthe countrys rice sector by releasing new high yielding rice varieties and introducingimproved rice production and protection technologies to help farmers realize the yieldpotentials of the varieties that they grow. The research and development programs atRRDI focuses on increasing farm productivity from the current 4.3 t/ha to 6.0 t/ha withinthe next 5 years, reducing cost of production and improving grain quality of rice.The main research and administration unit of RRDI is located at Batalagoda. TheRegional Agricultural Research and Development Center, Bombuwela and its satelliteresearch stations at Labuduwa and Bentota cater to the needs of the low country wetzone region. Whereas the Rice Research Station, Ambalantota holds the responsibility forthe development of rice varieties for the southern rice belt.The Director for Rice Research and Development is responsible for overall research andadministrative functions of the Institute. The Deputy Directors for Research atBatalagoda and Bombuwela and Research Officer-in-Charge at Ambalantota look overthe research activities at their respective centers.Policy frameworkVisionNational Prosperity through Excellence in Rice Production.Figure 2MissionTo be the National Center for the Development and Primary Dissemination of Technologiesto Improve the Productivity and Profitability of Rice Farming and Quality of Rice. Horticultural Crop Research and Development Institute (HoRDI) The Horticultural Crop Research and Development Institute (HoRDI) is vestedwith the responsibility of technology development concerning vegetables, fruits, root and 9
  10. 10. tuber crops and floriculture. The research programme focuses on the development ofimproved crop varieties, new propagation methods, post harvest and food processingmethods, the use of protected culture and ensuring better plant health with fewerdefendants on chemicals.Figure 3Policy FrameworkVisionAchieve excellence through development of horticultural crops for prosperity of the nation.MissionFunction as the national centre for research and development of sustainable and productivetechnologies for horticultural crops to ensure economic and social development ofthe farmers,and other stakeholders.MandateThe aim of HORDI is to generate and disseminate cost effective, eco-friendly and sustainabletechnologies that will increase productivity, improve quality, reduce post harvest losses andadd value to the products of mandated horticultural crops such as fruits, vegetables, root andtubers and ornamental crops while ensuring sustainable use of natural resources.Objectives • Utilize domestic and global bio-diversity to develop high quality and high yielding varieties of fruits, vegetables and root and tuber crops • Generate technologies for sustainable and productive horticulture development through basic, applied and adaptive research • Develop capabilities on post harvest technology, agroprocessing, product development, value addition and optimum utilization of horticulture products • Undertake on-farm research through farmer participatory approaches to strengthen research extension and farmer linkages • Strengthen collaborative research with universities, public and private sector institutions to share resources and expertise 10
  11. 11. Fruit Crops Research and Development Centre The Fruit Crops Research and Development Center was established in October 2001with a national mandate to develop and disseminate appropriate technologies to increase fruitproduction in the country. In 2005 the centre has also being given the responsibility ofdeveloping and dissemination of vegetable technology for low country wet zonePolicyFramewor Vision :To achieve national prosperity through exvcellence in fruit crop production. Mission :To make Sri Lanka one of the leading fruit producers in the region. Objectives : • To develop efficient and environmentally friendly, sustainable and economically viable production and harvesting and processing technologies on major fruit crops and low country vegetables. • To disseminate technologies in collaboration with state and private sector extension organizations. • To collaborate with other public and private organizations to make the country a major fruit producer and make fruit production a profitable venture. 11
  12. 12. Field Crops Research and Development Institute FCRDIPolicy frameworkVision of FCRDIAchieve national prosperity through excellence in field crops sectorMission of FCRDITo achieve economic revitalization of the farmers in the field crops sector and to assurenational food security through generation and facilitating the dissemination of technologynecessary for priority field crops to cater for sustainable field crops production in Sri Lanka.Objectives • Development of improved varieties of high yielding improved varieties of other field crops, dry zone vegetables and fruits suitable for irrigated and rainfed conditions with pest, disease and drought resistance quality. • Development of plant protection strategies to minimize crop losses due to pest and diseases • Development of improved agronomic practices to reduce the cost of production, to increase the productivity of agricultural lands and crops. • Testing the adaptability of new improved varieties and technologies. • Developing improved soil and water conservation methods and soil fertility management practices.GRAIN LEGUMES AND OIL CROPS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTRE This Centre was established in 1969 with Asian Development bank funds and wasadministered by River Valley Development Board Until 1977.Cotton was considered as themajor responsibility during this period.After taking over by the Department of Agriculture in 1977 it was upgraded to a RegionalAgriculture Research Centre in 1979. In 1994 this centre was brought under Field CropResearch and Development Institute (FCRDI) and in 2001 it has been named as theGrain Legumes and oil Crops Research and Development Centre.Policy frameworkVision:Achieve national prosperity through excellence in field cropsMission:Be the national centre for achieving economic re-vitalization of the farmers in the field cropssector and to assure national food security through generation, development anddissemination of technology necessary for priority field crops to cater to sustainable andcomparative field crops production in Sri Lanka. 12
  13. 13. 1. Development of high yielding improved varieties of other field crops, dry zone vegetables and fruits suitable for irrigated and rain-fed conditions with pest, disease and drought resistance and quality. 2. Developing improved soil and water conservation methods and soil fertility management practices. 3. Development of improved agronomic practices to reduce cost of production to increase the productivity of Agricultural lands and crop productivity. 4. Testing adaptability of new improved varieties and technologies. 5. Development of plant protection strategies to minimize crop losses due to pest and disease. Schools of Agriculture Institutionalised agricultural education for middle level agriculturists was started in1916 at the School of Tropical Agriculture, Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya. The schoolprovided practical agricultural training for future agricultural instructors, headmen, teachersand students interested in agriculture. In 1941 it was relocated in Gannoruwa, in newbuildings now occupied by the In-service Training Institute. The Sri Lanka School of Agriculture (SOAA) of the Department of Agriculture(DOA), Sri Lanka offer two year Diploma in Agriculture program in five different locationsat Kundasale in Kandy District, Palwehera at Matale District, Angunakolapallassa inHambantota district, Vavunia in Vavunia district, and Karapincha in Rathnapura district. Policy framework VisionTo be achieving excellence in intermediate agricultural education for national prosperity. MissionTo provide formal intermediate agricultural education to farming interested youths andservice personals through conducting two-year agricultural diploma programme for humanresource development in agriculture sector for sustainable agricultural development. Objectives of the School of Agriculture • To own and operate on farm or off farm agricultural enterprises. • To get employment in private or non-government organizations in agricultural sector • To get employment in government organizations as intermediate technical officers in the agricultural sector • To continue to follow formal, informal, training programs or academic programs to improve the carrier development. 13
  14. 14. CIC Agri Businesses The only SEED to SHELF Agriculture company in Sri Lanka that manages over10,000 Acres of it’s own Farm land, works directly with over 20,000 rural farmers andproduces a variety of Agriculture & Livestock products like Seed Paddy, Rice, Fruits,Vegetables, Eggs, Yoghurt, Curd etc under it’s own Brand name for the local and exportmarket, CIC Agri Businesses works with a strong commitment of enhancing farmer incomes,improving the Rural Economy and contributing towards the Development of Agriculture inSri Lanka with a view of transforming the island to a bountiful nationCIC Agri Businesses (Private) Limited is a subsidiary of CIC, which encompasses all theagriculture related businesses that are carried out within the CIC Group. CIC Agri Businesses(Private) Limited comprises of a number of companies. They are,CIC Seeds (Private) LimitedCIC Agri Biotech (Private) LimitedWayamba Agro Fertilizer Company LimitedCIC Agri Produce Export (Private) LimitedCIC Agri Produce Marketing (Private) LimitedCIC Tea Advisory Services (Private) LimitedSunhill Tea Factory (Private) LimitedPolicy frameworkVisionTo be the leader in enriching Sri Lanka’s agriculture with the best quality produce from Seedto Shelf.Mission 14
  15. 15. To provide innovative technologies and professional management to the agriculture sectorcontributing significantly to Sri Lanka’s GDP whilst ensuring trust from farmer to consumer.PhilosophyEnhance farmer income, improve the rural economy and contribute towards the developmentof Agriculture making Sri Lanka a Bountiful Nation. CIC Rural Humanity Service FoundationVisionVision of the Rural Humanity Services Foundation is to strengthen the knowledge and skillsof the rural farmer with the aim of uplifting the social and economic status of ruralcommunities.MissionThe mission of the Rural Humanity Services Foundation is to develop appropriate projectswith the coordination of government, non-government and private sector institutions, in orderto, • disseminate agriculture technology, knowledge and experiences to rural communities • develop infrastructures to facilitate production targets for local markets as well as for exports • popularize farming as an acceptable and dignified profession to attract the young and to provide significant contribution to achieve higher standard of living • collectively contribute significantly to the Gross National Product of the countryObjectivesThe objectives are, • Contribute towards improvement of living standard of the rural community • Development of the rural agriculture through education introducing modern technology and through attracting youth towards agriculture. • Create scholarship programs to assist the education of the needy students. 15
  16. 16. • Upgrade the infrastructure of rural schools and to develop the skills and knowledge of the rural students • Carry out programs & activities to support Sri Lankan’s agriculture development Hector Kobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and Training Institute HARTI The HARTI was established in order to generate a range of policy analysis that wouldcover those key determinants of human and resource development in the agrarian sector.Statutorily established in 1972 in collaboration with the UNDP/FAO, the Institute functionsunder the Ministry of Agriculture.It has developed into the premier national Institute in the field of socio-economic researchrelating to the use of land and water in Sri Lanka and has also developed the requisite skillsand infrastructure for providing relevant training to farmers, field workers and managers inboth the state and non-state sectors. The name of the Institute was changed as HectorKobbekaduwa Agrarian Research and Training Institute in February 1995.Policy frameworkVision Be the leader for generating and disseminating knowledge for sustainable agrarianand rural development. Mission To strengthen agrarian and rural sector through conducting research and trainingactivities.Goals • To be a centre of excellence in socio-economic research into agrarian questions; 16
  17. 17. • To liaise closely with planners and policy makers in the government, business and research communities; • To make policy process more effective through knowledge generation and timely dissemination; • To keep the public informed by providing independent assessments on national policy issues; • To strengthen the capacity for socio-economic policy analysis by investing in the capacities of its staff and the institutes knowledge base; • To increase the capacity of rural development stakeholders through training;Objectives • Timely dissemination of market information to policy makers, farmers and traders; • Identification of agrarian policy perspectives; • Research planning-priority setting in agrarian issues; • Building relationships with public/private sector organizations, universities and regional & international research institutes/agencies; • Widen and strengthen the scope of agrarian database; • Acquiring the required skills individually and collectively; and • Having a committed, competent and contented team of employees.Strategies • Strengthen the Research and Training Committee (RTC); • Agree on thematic areas; • Ensure uniformity of different types of publications - layout, cover page, pagination, fonts and styles; • Improve literature review in preparation of research proposal; • Arrange external review after peer review of all research reports before publication; • Assign the responsibility for each issue of the institute journal to the respective Division; • Obtain donor assistance to secure the services of a professional editor; • Increase research outputs in local languages; • Recruit researchers at senior level; • Explore possibility of getting research expatriates through the UNDP; • Establish linkages with universities; • Disseminate research findings at the end of the year colloquium; • Introduce measurable performance based evaluation system; • Organize faculty retreat; • Improve the quality of the printing of the publications. 17
  18. 18. Referenceshttp://www.iwmi.cgiar.org/index.aspxhttp://www.rrisl.lk/index.htmlhttp://www.cri.lk/index.htmlhttp://www.slcarp.lk/http://www.ips.lk/http://www.agridept.gov.lk/institutes_sub.php?mMenu=Rice&sMenu=Rice%20Research%20and%20Development%20Institute%20%28RRDI%29http://www.agridept.gov.lk/institutes_sub.php?mMenu=Horticulture&sMenu=%20%20Horticultural%20Crop%20Research%20and%20Development%20Institute%20%28HORDI%29http://www.agridept.gov.lk/institutes_sub.php?mMenu=Horticulture&sMenu=Fruit%20Crops%20Research%20and%20Development%20Centre%20%28FCRDC%20%29http://www.agridept.gov.lk/institutes.phphttp://www.cicagri.com/index.php?page_cat=homehttp://www.harti.lk/All web sites last updated 27-01-2011 18

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