Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
1
Following the Green
David Conrad + David Sherwin
AIGA SEATTLE | DESIGN BUSINESS FOR BREAKFAST
Following the Green | ©201...
2
We solve our client’s
business problems
by design…
MAKE WEBSITES F
DO PACKAGING D
DESIGN LOGOS F
CREATE APPLICATI
SKETCH...
3
But studio owners
have even more
problems to solve.
HIRE DESIGN STAFF
PAY TAXES QUART
SET FINANCIAL GO
SECURE NEW CLIE
E...
4
Most of them have
to do with money.
HIRE DESIGN STAFF
PAY TAXES QUART
SET FINANCIAL GO
SECURE NEW CLIE
ESTIMATE PROJE
NE...
5
What We’ll Cover Today
1. How design studios make money
2. Ways design studios organize themselves
to support making mon...
6
How Design Studios Make Money
7
There are only a few ways
design firms make money:
• Bill for time via a fixed fee, hourly estimate, or retainer
• Resel...
8
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
Great design jobs earn income
like this....
9
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
Most design firms, however,
have a distr...
10
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
Most design firms, however,
have a dist...
11
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
Over time, your revenue streams
can cha...
12
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
But organic growth carries risk
if it’s...
13
Here are some examples:*
• Solo designer
• Small studio (4 employees)
• Medium-sized local studio (12 employees)
• Larg...
14
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
RETAINER
STOCK
CLASS
TEACHING
FILLS REV...
15
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
SMALL STUDIO (4 EMPLOYEES)
PROJECT
NO C...
16
MEDIUM-SIZED LOCAL STUDIO (10 EMPLOYEES)
RELICENSING OF
CUSTOM PHOTOGRAPHY
SHORES UP LOWER BILLINGS.
Bill for
time
Rese...
17
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
MEDIA
LARGE INDEPENDENT CONSULTANCY (60...
18
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
MEDIA
BIG INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANCY (12...
19
What did you notice?
Most common methods of earning money:
Bill for time via fixed fee, hourly estimate, or retainer
Re...
20
There are always notable
exceptions to the rule.
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell things Give away Spin of...
21
A Design Studio’s Greatest Expense
22
INSERT
TALENT
LOGO 25¢
$
We’ve talked
about money from
a 10,000-foot level.
Now, let’s briefly
talk about people.
Follo...
23
In any design studio,
time and money are two
sides of the same coin.
+ $
MEANINGFUL
EFFORT
WORK =
Following the Green |...
24
But people are the true
currency of our profession.
Revenue always reflects this.
= PROCESS
$ PEOPLE + TOOLS
25
“Design businesses are little more
than a collection of people. Assets
come in the door in the morning
and go out the d...
26
There are many organizational
models for design studios
to empower their people…
Chain of command
Coaching
Associate
In...
27
CHAIN OF COMMAND ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL
Where it works:
• Specialized functions for employees
(a.k.a. assembly line work ...
28
COACHING ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL
Where it works:
• Small to mid-sized studios
• Team members are stronger
than the princip...
29
ASSOCIATE ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL
Where it works:
• Small to mid-sized studios
• Creative leads take stake
in company, ear...
30
INCUBATOR ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL
A design studio that also
functions as a product +
service incubator. Often
split 50/50 ...
31
BOUTIQUE ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL
Small design studio that can
mix, match, and experiment
with various other models.
Where ...
32
Alignment
between revenue
and staffing
is critical!
SENIOR
DESIGNER
ACCOUNT
MANAGER
ART
DIRECTOR
DESIGN
INTERN
JR.
DESI...
33
SENIOR
DESIGNER
ACCOUNT
MANAGER
ART
DIRECTOR
DESIGN
INTERN
JR.
DESIGNER
PRINCIPAL
ART
DIRECTOR
ACCOUNT
MANAGER
PRO-
GRA...
34
Creating a Studio Model
35
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
Determine what your design
studio experience should be:
1. Identify your design philosophy. Kno...
36
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
The elements of
design studio experience:
TANGIBLE
INTANGIBLE
FULFILLMENT
PORTFOLIO
CLIENTS STA...
37
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
The elements of
design studio experience:
TANGIBLE
INTANGIBLE
PORTFOLIO What impact will
our wo...
38
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
It all starts with your
design philosophy.
TANGIBLE
INTANGIBLE
FULFILLMENT
PORTFOLIO
CLIENTS ST...
39
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
It all starts with your
design philosophy.*
Write down on sticky notes what you’re doing right ...
40
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
Now, organize your thoughts.
Cluster your loves and hates.
Identify big-picture themes and valu...
41
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
Next, determine your capabilities
and identify your market needs…
TANGIBLE
INTANGIBLE
FULFILLME...
42
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
Understand your capabilities.
Write all the tasks you can fulfill with your current skill set.
...
43
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
Compare to your market demand.
Here’s how Design Commission forecasted—based on
their current s...
44
CREATING A STUDIO MODEL
Once we get to process
and culture, things start
to get complicated…
So let’s look at a
real-wo...
45
Hello, Design Commission
46
Design Commission
in a nutshell:
Founded in 2004 by
David Conrad and Jay Dokken
Currently 8 full-time employees
Special...
47
The world
as Jay
and Dave
see it…
48
We are fascinated by technology
and the way it disrupts
existing economies.
Our philosophy from
a studio perspective......
49
Be as resourceful as humanly
possible in the name of solving
problems for our clients.
This guides our
daily financial ...
50
•	 Start-up costs
•	 On-going overhead
•	 Utilization
•	 Clients
•	 Quality of work
•	 Culture
•	 Resource composition
...
51
Common startup costs:
•	Rent
•	Office Furniture
•	Computers
•	Phones
•	Internet
•	Sharpies
•	Office Snacks
•	Property I...
52
What we actually had:
•	 Property Insurance
•	 Health Insurance
•	 Dental
•	 Retirement Plan
•	 New shirt for meetings
...
53
Our
space...
54
Cultural
overhead
to boot...
55
Our gallery...
This isn’t about maximizing
money earned per sq. ft.
It’s about designing our
studio’s culture as part
o...
56
We make money based on the
value of the problem we are solving.
Find more valuable problems,
make more money.
Time is a...
57
Resource composition
Plan your finances around the intersection
between need and opportunity.
Project
Commission
Resour...
58
Weekly Utilization
DC 93%
JD 150%
ZZ 90%
SH 100%
AE 48%
JO 58%
89%
We target a blended
utilization rate at 70%.
This in...
59
There is such
a thing as
“GOOD
ENOUGH.”
Quality is always important,
but budget is often a
constraint any design
studio...
60
Process
We’re always optimizing and refining what we do.
•	Reducing the number of creative concepts to one
•	Fewer, sho...
61
Now, Let’s Talk About Money
62
“I’m not a businessman.
I’m a business. Man!”
—Jay-Z
1. Weekly management
2. Monthly management
3. Yearly management
4....
63
1. Weekly financial management
Individual project reports: Comparing budget
to actual expenses on a project-by-project ...
64
Project reports
1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin  David Conrad
65
Client Name 0–30 Days 31–60 Days 61–90 Days Over 90 Days
MegaCo $100 $500 $1,000
LittleCo, LLC $50 $50
Mom-n-Pop $25 $2...
66
Cashflow projections
1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Take a look at the example spreadsheet:
http://bit.ly/FollowtheGree...
67
Work in progress
1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin  David Conrad
Take a look at ...
68
Opportunities
1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Client Name Projected Revenue
New Project for MegaCo $2,000
Updates to las...
69
2. Monthly financial management
Review and send client statements: All clients with
active billings and/or work showing...
70
Dear MegaCo,
For your records, below you will find a current account statement.
Current Account Balance Invoice Project...
71
Profit and loss statement
2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin  David Conrad
Take ...
72
Balance sheet
2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin  David Conrad
Take a look at th...
73
Budget
2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin  David Conrad
Take a look at the examp...
74
3. Yearly financial management
Set goals: Write them down. Be realistic. Don’t overreach
what your staff is realistical...
75
Financial
•	Income distribution 
•	Client mix
•	Utilization
•	Calculating rates
•	Other things to watch
Operational
•	B...
76
55%	 Payroll/Benefits
15%		 Marketing
10%	 General Overhead
10%	 Facilities
10%	 Profit
Industry-standard income distri...
77
Memorize this. Pin it up to your wall:
No single client should account for
more than 25% of a studio’s business.
When i...
78
Typical studio utilization rates:
Calculating Utilization
	 52 WEEKS PER YEAR
–	 2 WEEKS SICK-LEAVE
–	 3 WEEKS OF HOLID...
79
Labor cost
Fixed overhead
Debt
Taxes
	 $50,000 PER YEAR
+	 $90,000 ($270,000 / 3 PEOPLE)
+	 0 (WOW, YOU’RE LUCKY!)
+	 $...
80
Calculating rates
4. FINANCIAL METRICS
Targeting 15%–25% profit across 3 employees
Total labor cost
Fixed overhead
Debt...
81
Mark-ups: Should always be at least 15-25%. At DC,
they charge 20%.
Minimum fees: At least 2 days for any project.
For ...
82
Backlog
4. OPERATIONAL METRICS
DC maintains
a 3 week backlog.
This is the amount of time that the studio is booked for,...
83
Staff composition
4. OPERATIONAL METRICS
Staff composition at most design studios is:
70%	 Creative/billable
30%	 Admin...
84
Keep your records for 6 years.
Don’t include the current year when you count to six.
Audits often don’t happen until 3 ...
85
Do your employee reviews
every 6 months.
Make sure that you clearly document them.
Employee reviews
4. OPERATIONAL METR...
86
How much to save
4. OPERATIONAL METRICS
Target 2–3 months of your
operating expenses.
But you should really save as muc...
87
Bid/win rate
4. MARKETING METRICS
Your bid/win rate should be
at least 50%.
DC captures about 55% for new clients, but ...
88
Lowering your rates
4. MARKETING METRICS
Use line-item costs
to show a discount.
Don’t reflect a discount in lower hour...
89
Estimates and proposals
shouldn’t take more than
1–2% of a project budget.
David C. spends 3–5 hours on a proposal
once...
90
5. When things go sideways (with money)
Client challenges value of work
Late or non-payment
Following the Green | ©2015...
91
If you hear from a client after a project has been
delivered that they are not satisfied with your work,
you have two i...
92
Communicate before you litigate.
You have options:
•	Always include a mediation clause
in your contracts
•	Discuss paym...
93
Parting Thoughts
94
“Your budget is a
reflection of your
philosophy.”
Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin  David Conrad
95
Know how big you want
your studio to be
when it grows up.
SENIOR
DESIGNER
ACCOUNT
MANAGER
ART
DIRECTOR
DESIGN
INTERN
JR...
96
To create a sustainable business,
never depend solely on organic growth.
Bill for
time
Resell
services
License IP Sell ...
97
Be proactive, not reactive.
Clients will respect you for it.
“TWO PM!”
“I’LL CALL YOU IN
TWO DAYS TO DISCUSS
THE WEBSIT...
98
Be paid well to be creative.
Know where money truly fits
in creating a sustainable future
for your business.
Following ...
99
Tools and resources
• Konigi Cost Estimator:
http://konigi.com/tools/schedule-and-cost-summary-calculator
• Harvest Tim...
100
David Sherwin
david@changeorderblog.com
davidsherwin.com/success
@changeorder
David Conrad
david@designcommission.com
...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Following the Green

16,568 views

Published on

Interested in starting your own design business, but don't know how to do the "business" part? This comprehensive presentation covers how design studios make money, the ways design studios organize themselves to support making money, considerations for managing your studio's finances, a method for creating your own studio model, and the story of Design Commission (http://www.designcommission.com), a successful design business in Seattle, Washington. This presentation was delivered by David Sherwin and David Conrad as part of AIGA Seattle's "Design Business for Breakfast" series and is now part of David Sherwin's book "Success by Design: The Essential Business Reference for Designers" (http://www.davidsherwin.com/success).

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

Following the Green

  1. 1. 1 Following the Green David Conrad + David Sherwin AIGA SEATTLE | DESIGN BUSINESS FOR BREAKFAST Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin & David Conrad
  2. 2. 2 We solve our client’s business problems by design… MAKE WEBSITES F DO PACKAGING D DESIGN LOGOS F CREATE APPLICATI SKETCH TOUCH S CRAFT EXPERIE MAKE ENVIRONME BUILD MOBILE APPL RESEARCH AND DISC CODE HTML PROTOTY FILM ADVERTISEM DEFINE BRANDS DESIGN DIRECT MAIL MAKE WIDGETS F Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin & David Conrad
  3. 3. 3 But studio owners have even more problems to solve. HIRE DESIGN STAFF PAY TAXES QUART SET FINANCIAL GO SECURE NEW CLIE ESTIMATE PROJE NEGOTIATE INSURA OVERSEE PROGR RESOURCING UPCOM PROMOTE AGENCY W MENTOR DIRECT REP GAUGE STAFF UTILI INSPIRE STUDIO CULT CHASE LATE INVO SWEAT EXPENSES Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin & David Conrad
  4. 4. 4 Most of them have to do with money. HIRE DESIGN STAFF PAY TAXES QUART SET FINANCIAL GO SECURE NEW CLIE ESTIMATE PROJE NEGOTIATE INSURA OVERSEE PROGR RESOURCING UPCOM PROMOTE AGENCY W MENTOR DIRECT REP GAUGE STAFF UTILI INSPIRE STUDIO CULT CHASE LATE INVO SWEAT EXPENSES Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin & David Conrad
  5. 5. 5 What We’ll Cover Today 1. How design studios make money 2. Ways design studios organize themselves to support making money 3. A method for creating your own studio model 4. Design Commission’s story—and how it fulfills its philosophies via their studio practices 5. Financials, including cash flow and managing studio finances 6. Parting thoughts and QA Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  6. 6. 6 How Design Studios Make Money
  7. 7. 7 There are only a few ways design firms make money: • Bill for time via a fixed fee, hourly estimate, or retainer • Resell services from vendors with a markup • License IP related to your design services • Sell things such as products and services you’ve created • Give away thought leadership (for slender fees) • Spin off side businesses from ideas incubated at work • Zzzzzzz… make money in your sleep Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  8. 8. 8 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz Great design jobs earn income like this. In our dreams. PROPORTIONOFREVENUE Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  9. 9. 9 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz Most design firms, however, have a distribution like this. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  10. 10. 10 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz Most design firms, however, have a distribution like this. MAKING MONEY ON WHAT YOU CAN’T DO Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  11. 11. 11 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz Over time, your revenue streams can change organically, based on how your client base evolves. WORKING FOR EQUITY Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  12. 12. 12 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz But organic growth carries risk if it’s not managed mindfully year-over-year by business area. EXPENSES MINUS SALES SHORTFALL = DRAG ON CORE SERVICES Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  13. 13. 13 Here are some examples:* • Solo designer • Small studio (4 employees) • Medium-sized local studio (12 employees) • Large independent consultancy (60 employees) • Big international consultancy (125 local employees) *NAMES WITHHELD/INFO EDITED SO WE CAN PROTECT OUR SOURCES. As studios grow larger, how they earn money changes. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  14. 14. 14 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz RETAINER STOCK CLASS TEACHING FILLS REVENUE SHORTFALLS SOLO DESIGNER FIXED FEE HOURLY HOURLY CLASS REVENUE AT RISK STRENGTHS Offers UI/UX, print design, art direction. Works mostly with colleges media co’s. Teaches classes on web design. Expert practicioner with solid portfolio. STRUGGLES Hard to maintain profit margin when market is volatile. Not interested in self-promotion, networking to new clients. Taking work from staffing agencies isn’t profitable. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  15. 15. 15 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz SMALL STUDIO (4 EMPLOYEES) PROJECT NO CLIENT WORK FOR TWO MONTHS = NO MORE COMPANY. PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PRINTING STRENGTHS Offers print design, branding, and publication work. Focus mostly on nonprofit work. Deep expertise and portfolio. Clients all come from networking. STRUGGLES No online presence. No thought leadership. Projects keep getting smaller. Uninterested in exploring new areas of ignorance. REVENUE AT RISKFollowing the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  16. 16. 16 MEDIUM-SIZED LOCAL STUDIO (10 EMPLOYEES) RELICENSING OF CUSTOM PHOTOGRAPHY SHORES UP LOWER BILLINGS. Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz PHOTO SHOOT PROJECT PHOTO LICENSING ARTICLES PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PHOTO SHOOT BLOG ADS STRENGTHS Offers print design, branding, and small-scale website design. Eclectic, arty portfolio. Fortune 1000 clients. People you like to work with. STRUGGLES One client provides most of the revenue. More production focused. Not following market trend to interactive services. REVENUE AT RISKFollowing the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  17. 17. 17 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz MEDIA LARGE INDEPENDENT CONSULTANCY (60 EMPLOYEES) PROJECT APIsPROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT STOCK WEBCASTING ARTICLES BLOGS PRODUCTION STRENGTHS Full-service agency with strengths in broadcast and webcasting. Known for ingenuity of thinking. Broad portfolio, but not deep across industry verticals. Fortune 500 clients. STRUGGLES Expertise in company spread thin across different business lines. To show creativity, some projects must be fulfilled at a loss. Estimates can be higher than market average. INDEPENDENT REVENUE STREAM. REVENUE AT RISKFollowing the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  18. 18. 18 Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz MEDIA BIG INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANCY (125 EMPLOYEES) PROJECT EXTRANET PROJECT RETAINER RETAINER METRICS NO MEDIA, NO PROFIT, NO STAFF. ARTICLES BLOGS HOSTING METRICS PLATFORM BOOKS CLOTHING ONLINE TV SHOW STRENGTHS Full-service agency with access to partners across a global network. Extraordinary portfolio. Top ranked in their market. Fortune 100 clients. STRUGGLES Media placements must equal time billed. Or else. Expectations are high, causing constant staff churn. Estimates aren’t competitive. REVENUE AT RISKFollowing the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  19. 19. 19 What did you notice? Most common methods of earning money: Bill for time via fixed fee, hourly estimate, or retainer Resell services from vendors with a markup Supplemental revenue streams: License IP related to your design services Sell things such as products and services you’ve created Give away thought leadership (for slender fees) Spin off side businesses from ideas incubated at work Unlikely, but you never know: Zzzzzzz… make money in your sleep Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  20. 20. 20 There are always notable exceptions to the rule. Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz MEDIA PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT HOSTING PRODUCT TEMPLATES PRINTING PRODUCT SUBSCRIPTION PRODUCT WEB MAGAZINE PRODUCT IDEAS PRODUCT PRODUCT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  21. 21. 21 A Design Studio’s Greatest Expense
  22. 22. 22 INSERT TALENT LOGO 25¢ $ We’ve talked about money from a 10,000-foot level. Now, let’s briefly talk about people. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  23. 23. 23 In any design studio, time and money are two sides of the same coin. + $ MEANINGFUL EFFORT WORK = Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  24. 24. 24 But people are the true currency of our profession. Revenue always reflects this. = PROCESS $ PEOPLE + TOOLS
  25. 25. 25 “Design businesses are little more than a collection of people. Assets come in the door in the morning and go out the door in the evening.” Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  26. 26. 26 There are many organizational models for design studios to empower their people… Chain of command Coaching Associate Incubator Boutique They are reflections of revenue and philosophy. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  27. 27. 27 CHAIN OF COMMAND ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL Where it works: • Specialized functions for employees (a.k.a. assembly line work model) • Can be modified to encourage cross-department collaboration Where it doesn’t work: • Small to mid-sized studios • Multiple principals • Poor management ACCOUNT DIRECTOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR UX/UI DESIGN LEAD ACCOUNT MANAGER ART DIRECTOR GOFER + LACKEY UX DESIGNER VISUAL DESIGNER PRODUCTION ARTIST YOU WILL DO MY BIDDING. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGER ACCOUNT DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGER DEVELOPER DIRECTOR OF TECH. DEVELOP- MENT LEAD JR. DEVELOPER SOURCE: CAMERON FOOTE YESSIR! Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  28. 28. 28 COACHING ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL Where it works: • Small to mid-sized studios • Team members are stronger than the principals, own projects, see the big picture Where it doesn’t work: • Studios with 25+ people • Principal doesn’t delegate • Team isn’t rewarded for greater ownership Poor coaching just creates a chain-of- command model. GO TEAM GO! SENIOR DESIGNER ACCOUNT MANAGER ART DIRECTOR INTERN JR. DESIGNER PRINCIPAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGER FLASH DEVELOPER SOURCE: CAMERON FOOTE ULP… Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  29. 29. 29 ASSOCIATE ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL Where it works: • Small to mid-sized studios • Creative leads take stake in company, earn comission and/or profit • Principal earns less profit year over year, but business is supported more by staff Where it doesn’t work: • Principal doesn’t delegate properly to associates • Lower-level staff isn’t promoted to associate Also known as a collective when there is no talent pool. ACCOUNT MANAGER INTERN ART DIRECTOR JR. DESIGNER WELCOME TO THE CLUB. PRINCIPAL ASSOCIATE PROJECT MANAGER ACCOUNT MANAGER DEVELOPER SOURCE: CAMERON FOOTE ASSOCIATE ASSOCIATE TALENT POOL Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  30. 30. 30 INCUBATOR ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL A design studio that also functions as a product + service incubator. Often split 50/50 between personal and client work. Where it works: • Studio is structured to earn revenue from apps, sites, ads, products, etc. • Proper balance between billings and studio projects Where it doesn’t work: • Overhead for product isn’t covered by billings • No business plan or acumen outside selling design services DESIGNER/ UX/SITE ADMIN. ACCOUNT MANAGER INTERN/ KEEPER OF TWITTER ITUNES APP STORE, HERE WE COME! PRINCIPAL BUSINESS/ APP GURU DEVELOPER/ TECH SUPPORT ACCOUNT MANAGER DESIGNER/ ACCOUNTING Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  31. 31. 31 BOUTIQUE ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL Small design studio that can mix, match, and experiment with various other models. Where it works: • Tight-knit, collaborative staff • Low head count • Willingness to experiment, test, and iterate models fast • Skin in the game Where it doesn’t work: • Initial revenue streams of the studio aren’t strong • Lack of shared responsibility • Burnout if treated too much like a startup INTERN, ETC. JR. DESIGNER DESIGN FIRM INGREDIENTS PROFIT SHARING COLLECTIVE LEADERSHIP PRODUCT INCUBATION FREELANCE STAFFERS FLAT ORG EVENT PRODUCTION ART GALLERY STOCK CREATION FANCY CUPCAKES PRINCIPAL PRINCIPAL PRINCIPAL Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  32. 32. 32 Alignment between revenue and staffing is critical! SENIOR DESIGNER ACCOUNT MANAGER ART DIRECTOR DESIGN INTERN JR. DESIGNER PRINCIPAL ART DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGER PRO- GRAMMER Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz PHOTO SHOOT PROJECT PHOTO LICENSING ARTICLES PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PHOTO SHOOT BLOG ADS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  33. 33. 33 SENIOR DESIGNER ACCOUNT MANAGER ART DIRECTOR DESIGN INTERN JR. DESIGNER PRINCIPAL ART DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGER PRO- GRAMMER Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz PHOTO SHOOT PROJECT PHOTO LICENSING ARTICLES PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PROJECT PHOTO SHOOT BLOG ADS So, how do you balance the two? Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  34. 34. 34 Creating a Studio Model
  35. 35. 35 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL Determine what your design studio experience should be: 1. Identify your design philosophy. Know where your passion lies in what you do. 2. Determine the tasks required to live by your philosophy. 3. Shape an organizational model that maps back to those tasks. 4. Determine the process and culture that maps back to your values and philosophy. This may evolve over time. 5. Pursue the clients that support your philosophy. 6. Ensure your portfolio supports your philosophy. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  36. 36. 36 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL The elements of design studio experience: TANGIBLE INTANGIBLE FULFILLMENT PORTFOLIO CLIENTS STAFF PROCESS CULTURE MARKET NEED CAPA- BILITIES PHILOSOPHY Design studio as a business Design studio as a practice DESIREProfit-oriented ($$$) Fulfillment-oriented (time) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  37. 37. 37 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL The elements of design studio experience: TANGIBLE INTANGIBLE PORTFOLIO What impact will our work have on the world? FULFILLMENT PORTFOLIO CLIENTS STAFF PROCESS CULTURE MARKET NEED CAPA- BILITIES PHILOSOPHY Design studio as a business Design studio as a practice STAFF: Which employees will strive to create our best work? CULTURE: How will we work together successfully? CAPABILITIES: What skills do we need to achieve our goals? PHILOSOPHY: What values drive our daily practice? DESIRE PORTFOLIO: How will our work fulfill desired outcomes? CLIENTS: How will we work together as thought partners? PROCESS: How will we fulfill work profitably? MARKET NEED: What skills do we need to be hired? PHILOSOPHY: What values drive our daily business? Profit-oriented (MONEY) Fulfillment-oriented (TIME) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  38. 38. 38 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL It all starts with your design philosophy. TANGIBLE INTANGIBLE FULFILLMENT PORTFOLIO CLIENTS STAFF PROCESS CULTURE MARKET NEED CAPA- BILITIES PHILOSOPHY Design studio as a business Design studio as a practice DESIREProfit-oriented ($$$) Fulfillment-oriented (time) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  39. 39. 39 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL It all starts with your design philosophy.* Write down on sticky notes what you’re doing right now as a designer. Filter those sticky notes into two categories: what you are loving, and what you’re hating and could live without. (Personally, I hate doing the dishes.) Add to the “love” area things you want to do as a designer. These may be goals for the future and areas of interest that you’d like to explore. (Use a second color of sticky notes for these.) *ADAPTED FROM AN ADAPTIVE PATH ARTICLE BY PAM DAGHLIAN, READ IT HERE: HTTP://WWW.ADAPTIVEPATH.COM/IDEAS/GOAL-MAPPING-IN-A-NUTSHELL/ Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  40. 40. 40 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL Now, organize your thoughts. Cluster your loves and hates. Identify big-picture themes and values. Distill these into a philosophy for your creative business. Try to keep it to a few words—not a manifesto. Your philosophy and themes will help guide you in how you create a growth path for your business in the short-, mid-, and near-term. It will also serve as a North Star in how you make important fiscal decisions. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  41. 41. 41 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL Next, determine your capabilities and identify your market needs… TANGIBLE INTANGIBLE FULFILLMENT PORTFOLIO CLIENTS STAFF PROCESS CULTURE MARKET NEED CAPA- BILITIES PHILOSOPHY Design studio as a business Design studio as a practice DESIGN TO GUIDE A BETTER SOCIETY. DESIRE DESIGN TO GUIDE A BETTER SOCIETY. Profit-oriented ($$$) Fulfillment-oriented (time) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  42. 42. 42 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL Understand your capabilities. Write all the tasks you can fulfill with your current skill set. Note what you’re really good at, and what areas you want to grow into. Map them by project lifecycle. Project Commission Resource Allocation VIsual Design Coding Scripting Compat- ability Testing Launch Accessibility Content Population Database Design Functional Specification Copywriting + Editing Concept Development Business Analysis Content Strategy Information Architecture Asset Preparation Technical Specification Usability Testing Code Debugging Search Engine Optimization Acceptance Testing Accounting Maintenance +Improvement INTANGIBLE SWEET SPOT GROWTH AREA TANGIBLE NOT A JOB FUNCTION Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  43. 43. 43 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL Compare to your market demand. Here’s how Design Commission forecasted—based on their current staffing—what specific tasks are supported by their staff. It also identifies gaps for future staffing needs. Project Commission Resource Allocation VIsual Design Coding Scripting Compat- ability Testing Launch Accessibility Content Population Database Design Functional Specification Copywriting + Editing Concept Development Business Analysis Content Strategy Information Architecture Asset Preparation Technical Specification Usability Testing Code Debugging Search Engine Optimization Acceptance Testing Accounting Maintenance +Improvement AVI:DAVE: BREADTH OF SKILL SET CAN EQUAL HIGHER UTILIZATION ACROSS A PROJECT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  44. 44. 44 CREATING A STUDIO MODEL Once we get to process and culture, things start to get complicated… So let’s look at a real-world example. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  45. 45. 45 Hello, Design Commission
  46. 46. 46 Design Commission in a nutshell: Founded in 2004 by David Conrad and Jay Dokken Currently 8 full-time employees Specialization in Interactive Design (a.k.a. “We design and build websites”) Located in Pioneer Square in a street-level gallery space within the Tashiro Kaplan Building. Come say hello! Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  47. 47. 47 The world as Jay and Dave see it…
  48. 48. 48 We are fascinated by technology and the way it disrupts existing economies. Our philosophy from a studio perspective... This definitely guides our daily financial decisions. As a rule, we look for disruption in markets. There’s a pretty good chance that there will be some money hanging around.
  49. 49. 49 Be as resourceful as humanly possible in the name of solving problems for our clients. This guides our daily financial decisions: Don’t be too frugal— buy the tools that help you do more and/or better work. Our philosophy from an operations perspective...
  50. 50. 50 • Start-up costs • On-going overhead • Utilization • Clients • Quality of work • Culture • Resource composition • Process Words we’ve had to learn:
  51. 51. 51 Common startup costs: • Rent • Office Furniture • Computers • Phones • Internet • Sharpies • Office Snacks • Property Insurance • Health Insurance • Dental • Retirement Plan • New shirt for meetings • Parking • Conference Dues • Paychecks Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  52. 52. 52 What we actually had: • Property Insurance • Health Insurance • Dental • Retirement Plan • New shirt for meetings • Parking • Conference Dues • Paychecks • Rent • Office Furniture • Computers • Phones • Internet • Sharpies • Office Snacks Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  53. 53. 53 Our space...
  54. 54. 54 Cultural overhead to boot...
  55. 55. 55 Our gallery... This isn’t about maximizing money earned per sq. ft. It’s about designing our studio’s culture as part of an artistic community.
  56. 56. 56 We make money based on the value of the problem we are solving. Find more valuable problems, make more money. Time is a component to this process, but it shouldn’t be the only factor— and it isn’t the the most significant one. So, how do we make money? Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  57. 57. 57 Resource composition Plan your finances around the intersection between need and opportunity. Project Commission Resource Allocation VIsual Design Coding Scripting Compat- ability Testing Launch Accessibility Content Population Database Design Functional Specification Copywriting + Editing Concept Development Business Analysis Content Strategy Information Architecture Asset Preparation Technical Specification Usability Testing Code Debugging Search Engine Optimization Acceptance Testing Accounting Maintenance +Improvement AVI:DAVE: Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  58. 58. 58 Weekly Utilization DC 93% JD 150% ZZ 90% SH 100% AE 48% JO 58% 89% We target a blended utilization rate at 70%. This includes designers, administrative staff, business development staff, and partners (who are the managers at DC). Staff utilization Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  59. 59. 59 There is such a thing as “GOOD ENOUGH.” Quality is always important, but budget is often a constraint any design studio must deal with. To define “good enough”, communication with the client at every step in the process is critical. Quality of work The bottom line is… Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  60. 60. 60 Process We’re always optimizing and refining what we do. • Reducing the number of creative concepts to one • Fewer, shorter meetings with only required participants • Not including senior-level talent when they aren’t needed Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  61. 61. 61 Now, Let’s Talk About Money
  62. 62. 62 “I’m not a businessman. I’m a business. Man!” —Jay-Z 1. Weekly management 2. Monthly management 3. Yearly management 4. Financial, operational, and marketing metrics 5. When things go sideways (with money) $ Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  63. 63. 63 1. Weekly financial management Individual project reports: Comparing budget to actual expenses on a project-by-project basis Aging summary: What billed work has not been paid by your clients Cashflow projections: Based on your aging summary, how much money will be “banked” over time Work in progress: Represents work which has been contracted but not billed. Opportunities: Theoretical future revenue that may be earned from new business efforts, including proposals being reviewed by existing and possible new clients Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  64. 64. 64 Project reports 1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  65. 65. 65 Client Name 0–30 Days 31–60 Days 61–90 Days Over 90 Days MegaCo $100 $500 $1,000 LittleCo, LLC $50 $50 Mom-n-Pop $25 $25 $500 Total $175 $575 $1,000 $500 Are you asking for payment up front? Withholding credit if the client has major invoices long past due? Providing a discount if the client pays within 30 days? Aging summary 1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  66. 66. 66 Cashflow projections 1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Take a look at the example spreadsheet: http://bit.ly/FollowtheGreenXLS (link is case-sensitive, btw) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  67. 67. 67 Work in progress 1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad Take a look at the example spreadsheet: http://bit.ly/FollowtheGreenXLS (link is case-sensitive, btw)
  68. 68. 68 Opportunities 1. WEEKLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Client Name Projected Revenue New Project for MegaCo $2,000 Updates to last year’s LittleCo project $800 Total $2,800 Remember that this is theoretical! You won’t close every opportunity that’s presented to you. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  69. 69. 69 2. Monthly financial management Review and send client statements: All clients with active billings and/or work showing open items receive a statement noting what payment is due ASAP Profit and loss: Represents the finances of the firm over a given period of time, most typically year over year Net income is most important; it’s what is divided among shareholders/partners and taxed Balance sheet: Represents the value of the business Look at budget: Review both year-over-year and month- to-month financial picture Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  70. 70. 70 Dear MegaCo, For your records, below you will find a current account statement. Current Account Balance Invoice Project Due Date Amt Due 31–60 DAYS PAST DUE January 1, 2009 Invoice 724 Website Design Due: January 31, 2009 $100 61–90 DAYS PAST DUE December 1, 2008 Invoice 721 Website Design Due: December 31, 2008 $100 Outstanding Balance $200 Client statement 2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  71. 71. 71 Profit and loss statement 2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad Take a look at the example spreadsheet: http://bit.ly/FollowtheGreenXLS (link is case-sensitive, btw)
  72. 72. 72 Balance sheet 2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad Take a look at the example spreadsheet: http://bit.ly/FollowtheGreenXLS (link is case-sensitive, btw)
  73. 73. 73 Budget 2. MONTHLY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad Take a look at the example spreadsheet: http://bit.ly/FollowtheGreenXLS (link is case-sensitive, btw)
  74. 74. 74 3. Yearly financial management Set goals: Write them down. Be realistic. Don’t overreach what your staff is realistically capable of fulfilling… “Next year we want to grow the studio by X number of people, increase revenue by XX%, and add X benefits…” Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  75. 75. 75 Financial • Income distribution  • Client mix • Utilization • Calculating rates • Other things to watch Operational • Backlog • Staff composition • Records for six years • Employee reviews • How much to save Marketing • Bid/win rate • Lowering your rates • Estimate and proposal terms 4. Metrics, oh my! Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  76. 76. 76 55% Payroll/Benefits 15% Marketing 10% General Overhead 10% Facilities 10% Profit Industry-standard income distribution 4. FINANCIAL METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  77. 77. 77 Memorize this. Pin it up to your wall: No single client should account for more than 25% of a studio’s business. When it happens—and it will!—immediately draw up a list of new potential clients to call… Client mix a.k.a “account vulnerability” 4. FINANCIAL METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  78. 78. 78 Typical studio utilization rates: Calculating Utilization 52 WEEKS PER YEAR – 2 WEEKS SICK-LEAVE – 3 WEEKS OF HOLIDAY  = 45 WEEKS PER YEAR x 40 HOURS A WEEK = 1,800 HRS/YEAR / 65% DC UTILIZATION RATE 1,170 HOURS PER YEAR YOU CAN ACTUALLY CHARGE YOUR CLIENTS Utilization 4. FINANCIAL METRICS 80% Creative direction 80% Design 80% Production 80% Project Management 30% Marketing 10% Administration 60% Overall blended rate Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  79. 79. 79 Labor cost Fixed overhead Debt Taxes $50,000 PER YEAR + $90,000 ($270,000 / 3 PEOPLE) + 0 (WOW, YOU’RE LUCKY!) + $7,900 (MINUS 15.8% OF SALARY) = $147,900 PER YEAR TO EMPLOY THIS PERSON / 1,170 HOURS = $126 PER HOUR BASE RATE FOR AN EMPLOYEE Your costs per employee: Where does profit fit in? Calculating rates 4. FINANCIAL METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  80. 80. 80 Calculating rates 4. FINANCIAL METRICS Targeting 15%–25% profit across 3 employees Total labor cost Fixed overhead Debt Total taxes Profit margin Total profit Total resource hours Base rate Final billing rate $150,000 ($50,000 PER YEAR FOR 3 PEOPLE) + $270,000 + 0 (WOW, YOU’RE LUCKY!) + $23,700 (MINUS 15.8% OF $150,000 IN SALARY) = $443,700 PER YEAR TO EMPLOY THESE PEOPLE x 20% = $88,740 / 3,510 HOURS (3 PEOPLE AT 1,170 HOURS A YEAR) = $25 PER HOUR + $126 PER HOUR BASE RATE FOR AN EMPLOYEE = $151 PER HOUR Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  81. 81. 81 Mark-ups: Should always be at least 15-25%. At DC, they charge 20%. Minimum fees: At least 2 days for any project. For in-progress work, DC charges in full hour incre- ments. (Use this fee with discretion.) Cancellation fees: Time worked or 20% project fee, whichever is higher.  When to invoice: No later than the Friday following the completion of work. If project is delayed, invoice after 45 days. Always avoid cash: It’s not trackable. Set dollar limits: On all staff spending approvals. Other things to keep an eye on 4. FINANCIAL METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  82. 82. 82 Backlog 4. OPERATIONAL METRICS DC maintains a 3 week backlog. This is the amount of time that the studio is booked for, running at full capacity. The industry average is 2–4 weeks. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  83. 83. 83 Staff composition 4. OPERATIONAL METRICS Staff composition at most design studios is: 70% Creative/billable 30% Admin/non-billable Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  84. 84. 84 Keep your records for 6 years. Don’t include the current year when you count to six. Audits often don’t happen until 3 years after your filing date. Audits 4. OPERATIONAL METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  85. 85. 85 Do your employee reviews every 6 months. Make sure that you clearly document them. Employee reviews 4. OPERATIONAL METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  86. 86. 86 How much to save 4. OPERATIONAL METRICS Target 2–3 months of your operating expenses. But you should really save as much as possible. Nothing that you do as a business owner will give you more peace of mind than a big savings account. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  87. 87. 87 Bid/win rate 4. MARKETING METRICS Your bid/win rate should be at least 50%. DC captures about 55% for new clients, but they have a mix of repeat clients and ongoing work. If you aren’t getting above that number, you may want to re- evaluate your proposal process. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  88. 88. 88 Lowering your rates 4. MARKETING METRICS Use line-item costs to show a discount. Don’t reflect a discount in lower hourly rates or in less estimated time. This will help you keep your books straight. This should be a last resort to win a project. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  89. 89. 89 Estimates and proposals shouldn’t take more than 1–2% of a project budget. David C. spends 3–5 hours on a proposal once a project has been qualified. Make sure your estimates and proposals are noted as being valid for up to 30 days. Use the same rate for all clients and all projects. Estimate and proposal terms 4. MARKETING METRICS Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  90. 90. 90 5. When things go sideways (with money) Client challenges value of work Late or non-payment Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  91. 91. 91 If you hear from a client after a project has been delivered that they are not satisfied with your work, you have two immediate options: 1. Apologize for their dissatisfaction, and explain why it’s not a possibility to budge on your fees. 2. Apologize for their dissatisfaction, and ask them to talk to you more about how the problems may be fixed. Each option has a cost. Choosing #2 may cost you money. Choosing #1 may cost you your reputation. Client challenges to the value of work 5. WHEN THINGS GO SIDEWAYS (WITH MONEY) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  92. 92. 92 Communicate before you litigate. You have options: • Always include a mediation clause in your contracts • Discuss payment options (credit cards, loans, equity, trades) • If that fails, send the case to collection, which may be able to claim a fraction of your fees • Document correspondence and get signatures on everything, including past payments— which legally signal intent to pay for services rendered Late or non-payment 5. WHEN THINGS GO SIDEWAYS (WITH MONEY) Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  93. 93. 93 Parting Thoughts
  94. 94. 94 “Your budget is a reflection of your philosophy.” Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  95. 95. 95 Know how big you want your studio to be when it grows up. SENIOR DESIGNER ACCOUNT MANAGER ART DIRECTOR DESIGN INTERN JR. DESIGNER PRINCIPAL ART DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGER PRO- GRAMMER Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  96. 96. 96 To create a sustainable business, never depend solely on organic growth. Bill for time Resell services License IP Sell things Give away Spin off Zzzzzzz
  97. 97. 97 Be proactive, not reactive. Clients will respect you for it. “TWO PM!” “I’LL CALL YOU IN TWO DAYS TO DISCUSS THE WEBSITE CHANGES. WHEN IS GOOD?” Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  98. 98. 98 Be paid well to be creative. Know where money truly fits in creating a sustainable future for your business. Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  99. 99. 99 Tools and resources • Konigi Cost Estimator: http://konigi.com/tools/schedule-and-cost-summary-calculator • Harvest Time Tracking http://getharvest.com • Pulse http://pulseapp.com/ • Quickbooks Online • Creative Business • AIGA Center for Practice Management http://cpm.aiga.org/ • Cameron Foote’s books • Google will help you find form/contract/document templates Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad
  100. 100. 100 David Sherwin david@changeorderblog.com davidsherwin.com/success @changeorder David Conrad david@designcommission.com designcommission.com @davidconrad Find all of this information and more in Success by Design: The Essential Business Reference for Designers http://davidsherwin.com/success http://bit.ly/successdesignbook Following the Green | ©2015 David Sherwin David Conrad No reproduction or distribution without permission of the authors. The advice provided in this presentation is no substitute for financial and legal advice from professionals, so stop reading this and go find a great accountant, bookkeeper, and/or laywer for your business!

×