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Bringing Buzz to the World – building an Enterprise Social Network as a community

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Bringing Buzz to the World – building an Enterprise Social Network as a community

  1. 1. Bringing Buzz to the World Louise McGregor @changememe
  2. 2. I Isaid goodbye to ING in December said goodbye to ING in December 2013, I Ishare the story of 2013, share the story of implementing Buzz, an Enterprise implementing Buzz, an Enterprise Social Network, with their Social Network, with their permission and support. permission and support. Flickr : drbutoni
  3. 3. Buzz – a Timeline 2009 Grassroots pilot 2010 Chose SP2010 2011 Added Sitrion 2012 Launch Global 2013 Adoption 2014 Integration
  4. 4. So what did we learn? Lots! So what did we learn? Lots! Here are the 10 big lessons. Here are the 10 big lessons. Flickr : Pedro Vezini
  5. 5. 1 Involve Users People are nice you can trust them Very simple governance We involved the users as much as We involved the users as much as possible – including choosing the possible – including choosing the name “Buzz” I Iagreed with the name “Buzz” agreed with the caveat that we shouldn’t have any caveat that we shouldn’t have any cute bees, this is what we got… cute bees, this is what we got… Flickr : Malisia
  6. 6. An “Angry bee” character An “Angry bee” character in our launch videos in our launch videos
  7. 7. Ways we involve users • Naming • Usability • ideas on a placemat please • #Buzzchat (similar to twitter chats) • Crowd-source ideas • Involved in the development cycle
  8. 8. 2 People are nice; trust them People are nice you can trust them We wanted to work from aa We wanted to work from principle of trust; so we didn’t put principle of trust; so we didn’t put aalot of rules in place. lot of rules in place. This was aachallenge as we’re in aa This was challenge as we’re in regulated industry. regulated industry. Flickr : Andy Woo
  9. 9. Simple User Agreement • • • • Be nice Content is public Fill out your profile You are responsible for communities you start • Buzz is socially moderated
  10. 10. Anyone Can Start a Community • Encourage a business purpose • Think through how you will manage the content • Think of the user – how do they benefit • Inactive communities (60 days) are removed
  11. 11. Social Moderation • Flagged to community manager, to my team, and to compliance • If they can’t resolve it with the individual we go to person’s manager, HR or legal only 33posts have only posts have been reported out of been reported out of thousands over two thousands over two years years
  12. 12. 3 Model the behaviour you want Model behaviour you want Use the tool you as much as you Use the tool you as much as you can to do your own work… it builds can to do your own work… it builds credibility credibility Photo – mine; featuring my mother and my brother
  13. 13. Virtuous Circle ≈ Use the tool ≈ You learn more to improve the tool ≈ ≈ ≈ More credible with users ≈ Users copy your behaviour ≈ ≈
  14. 14. 4 Support Users User support Phase 2 Low need for the “innovators” and Low need for the “innovators” and “early adopters”. “early adopters”. Big need for the global “majority”. Big need for the global “majority”. Need drops again as community Need drops again as community matures and learns to support matures and learns to support each other. each other. Flickr : Wilson
  15. 15. Buzz Support Community • About 800 members • Don’t have to be a member to ask (or answer) a question • Now get 5-10 questions per day daily check by a daily check by a community manager community manager --no question left no question left unanswered unanswered
  16. 16. 5 Community managers are heroes They are the front line in building adoption. They are the front line in building adoption. At ING they are subject matter experts who At ING they are subject matter experts who also run aacommunity. Not full time also run community. Not full time community managers. community managers. Flickr : Mary Mactavish
  17. 17. Expertise; Agile • Agile is new for us, development teams like it! • 900 members • About an update per day, usually a lot of responses per update
  18. 18. Service Channel; Kreta • 250 members • Supports use of Kreta tool • Questions answered by community or Kreta team • Decreased response time to customer
  19. 19. Cost Reduction; Crowd Savers • New idea • 465 members • 2-4 updates per week • Total savings >50,000
  20. 20. The original brochure was The original brochure was designed via the crowd savers designed via the crowd savers community. community. The text was translated to The text was translated to 88languages in 22days. languages in days. For free. For free.
  21. 21. 6 Ignore Technology Ignore technology In the early stages we spent aalot In the early stages we spent lot of time on implementing the of time on implementing the platform. platform. But this is not aatechnology project But this is not technology project --success rests on helping people success rests on helping people work differently work differently Flickr : Orkomedix
  22. 22. When to think about technology 2009 Grassroots pilot 2010 Chose SP2010 2011 Added Sitrion ✔ 2012 Launch Global 2013 Adoption 2014 Integration ✔
  23. 23. Who talks about technology Executives Development team(IT) ✔✔✔ Users Community managers Business partners HR Platform manager ✔✔✔ Finance Risk ✔
  24. 24. 7 Executives On Board Execs on board Talk to them about business results; connect your Talk to them about business results; connect your Enterprise Social Network to aasolution for Enterprise Social Network to solution for something they are concerned about. something they are concerned about. Even better --get them to use the platform Even better get them to use the platform Flickr : Nestlé
  25. 25. ING’s CEO active on Buzz seen as positive by seen as positive by all commenters all commenters
  26. 26. 8 Measure Value Business value – measure it Traffic data is easy --and useful. Traffic data is easy and useful. But to determine success you need to dig into the But to determine success you need to dig into the content and the business purpose of content and the business purpose of communities communities Flickr : PinkPurse
  27. 27. Valuation Layers Business Value Content Value Activity Communities User numbers Flickr : Tim Ebbs
  28. 28. #Buzzworks hashtag invented by hashtag invented by users, added to aa users, added to conversation when they conversation when they see something that see something that worked. worked.
  29. 29. 9 Work is still social We are social at work --it’s part of working We are social at work it’s part of working together. together. So there are non-work communities on Buzz. So there are non-work communities on Buzz. Flickr : Andy Stewart
  30. 30. Social Communities exist on Buzz one of the one of the “non-work” “non-work” communities communities
  31. 31. 10 Let stuff go! Let stuff happen The more freedom you can give your users the The more freedom you can give your users the better --they will find the best business uses for better they will find the best business uses for the Enterprise Social Network. the Enterprise Social Network. Flickr : DestinysAgent
  32. 32. Buzz is aasuccess; we have user data and business value data to support this. But Buzz is success; we have user data and business value data to support this. But it’s more than data. it’s more than data. When aacolleague said he “couldn’t understand twitter or Facebook, but could not When colleague said he “couldn’t understand twitter or Facebook, but could not work without Buzz” I Iknew it was changing the way we work. work without Buzz” knew it was changing the way we work.
  33. 33. A New Challenge - Life after ING • I’m working on a book; a guide to implementing an Enterprise Social Network • If you’d like to help me please go to my blog www.changememe.com and answer my survey on these themes What went well? Where did you struggle? What would you do differently? What will success look like for you? 33
  34. 34. Let’s connect! Louise McGregor Louise McGregor Louise.mcgregor@outlook.com Louise.mcgregor@outlook.com Flickr | fengschwing Changememe.com Changememe.com @changememe @changememe 34

Editor's Notes

  • A disclaimer – I left ING in December, I do have their permission to give this presentation about our work there implementing an Enterprise Social Network, and the project manager gave me access to recent info and data.
    I’m now working on a book – loosely titled “the Enterprise Social Network Playbook”, so I’ve been researching and writing about this topic more since then.
  • So what did we learn through this process – lots!
    I’m going through the ten big lessons.
  • Involve users.
    In that grassroots pilot we had there were about 400 active users of about 3000 total and they turned out to be our innovators and our earliest adopters.
    We had users involved from the beginning – from the design and startup phases, including crowd sourcing a name
    - Buzz was the name chosen, it wasn’t my choice
    - I agreed on proviso that there were no “cute bees” – so the launch video included an “angry bee” so be careful what you wish for!
    We had a usability testing using a wireframe on a the table mat in the cafes.
    We’ve had user sessions – physical meetings
    We’ve had “#buzzchats” to collect input from users
  • Naming
    Usability
    Testing
    Ideas on a placemat please
    Chat
    1 hour #buzzchats to discuss the future of Buzz
    Crowd-source ideas for
    New projects
    Promotion
    Involved in the development cycle
  • Put in place very simple governance
    If you’re asking people to share knowledge it doesn’t make sense to put a lot of rules in place
    This was challenging because we’re in a highly regulated risk-averse industry
    HR colleagues wanted all profile images reviewed (back in 2010)
    - I agreed, and sent them an outline of what that would take ie; budget from them and a workflow including who from HR would do the reviewing.
    - As of 1 December 2013 I hadn’t heard back
    - most people used a passport photo, I came across about 3 or 4 who didn’t
    RISK colleagues wanted “four eyes”, as in a check because they saw it as publishing content to our intranet
    - got agreement to go with publishing under the person’s own name, plus a reporting feature
    - a total of three reported incidents; one was by mistake.
  • “I understand that I am responsible for the content I share and publish on Buzz, and I agree with the user agreement”
    Everything you do is in your own name; this stops trolling and helps keep people focussed on work (when we had one platform allowing anon comments we did see some trolling unfortunately). To people who have pointed out the advantage of having anonymous submissions our answer is – if there’s really a need for that it points to a bigger problem.
  • Use the tool as much as you can to do your own work – you will build credibility,
    You will build credibility by using it in the way you expect your users to
    They will copy your behaviour,
    Sharing
    Open
    Questioning
    Respectful
    Particularly important in the case of any “difficult conversations”
  • You’ll set up a virtuous circle where you learn from your users
  • We found this was most necessary on phase 2 – when we went global.
    When we first launched it was a quiet launch, and the users were from the innovator or or early adopter groups and were able to solve problems themselves
    When we started the global roll out we increased support…. And when we turned off the “online directory” which forced people to use Buzz we upped it even more. I brought in an extra person for 10 hours a week; when I interviewed her I warned her there could be a lot of grumpy people and her answer was “Grumpy People are my Speciality”… she got the job!
    Within a year we could reduce it again because enough people know how to use Buzz that they answered each other’s questions.
  • Daily check by community manager - but most questions answered by members including the one shown
  • Community managers are heroes
    They’re your front line
    They do so much of the real work of building adoption in your company.
    Who has full time community managers with that as a job title?
    We didn’t, one is a cheap reason – we were not allowed to hire new people, and any new role like that would have been a board decision.
    But it also turns out to be good that community managers have subject matter expertise, and can support their colleagues on the content.
    We’ve set up training for our community managers, and we also offer coaching to help them get started – we’ve seen communities be more successful when that is in place.
    The best community managers are also the ones who can see the business value and demonstrate that value to senior management
  • Originally started more as a “PR” community, but found there were a lot of functional questions – so changed purpose, spent time talking to the people who use the Kreta tool
    The Kreta tool is an internal tool used in the assessment of loans.
    Average response time was 8 days.
    Questions asked via Buzz get answers on the same day, so response time is now averaging 4 hours (there are a few that take extremely long to solve though – Buzz can’t answer everything).
    It’s a huge success with 100% of the users ( no that is not a made up statistic) saying they’re happy with Buzz.
    If we’d taken a traditional route of calcutating ROI, and deciding what would be created we would never have found this.
  • Mostly small design projects Will see if we can use it for non-critical translation work as well (HR)
    Original idea came from an intern, it now has procurement department support
    Again the original Buzz team would never have thought of this.
  • A small design project = make a brochure/poster to promote Buzz, this was done via the Crowdsavers community.
    Then members of the community translated it; within two working days we had the text in 8 languages.
  • To quote Kevin Cody “It’s not about technology most intranets do the same thing functionally”
    If you’re at the stage of chosing a platform you’ll spend a lot of time thinking about technology and figuring out what you need. We had lots of technical challenges around implementation and connectivity so by the time we launched we felt a great sense of completion – but actually the fun was just beginning.
    Once you’re past implementation stop talking about it; when you describe how your Enterprise Social Network works this (image) is what people hear.
    It’s confusing and not useful for them.
    Instead talk about “what’s in it for me?”, and how it can be used.
  • Exec
    IT
    User
    Community managers
    Business partners
    HR
    Platform managers
    Finance
    Risk
  • Talk to them about business outcomes, about value you bring to business
    Talk about real time collaboration
    - not an internal facebook
    - not social
    Find a role for them, and make them visible.
    When we started the project we had a CEO who believed it was a good idea and supportive (appeared in launch video)
    In October last year we had new, much younger CEO start and he is committed, and uses Buzz for pretty serious conversations. The internal comms team help!
  • Blog post (roughly once a week)
    He took on the role in October and has been active from the beginning – this is his first post, and has 262 likes
    It’s been very positively received, although it is extra work for the internal communications colleagues.
    It’s been used for strategy discussions…
    Knowledge sharing
    Faster solutions
    Innovation
    Crowd-sourcing
    Service channel
    And we have data and examples to suppor that now.
  • It’s not enough to look at just the “traffic” data of user numbers and activity, you have to dig a little deeper and analyse what’s going on in the community. We’re now working on a content valuation model, to try and see if we can predict what will make communities work better;
    We already know that training community managers and coaching them once they start are key.
    And we’ve identified some communities with real business value, particularly in the communities of practice and internal service channels.
  • User numbers
    Community numbers
    Activity
    Content Value
    Business Value
    It’s not enough to look at just the “traffic” data of user numbers and activity, you have to dig a little deeper and analyse what’s going on in the community. We’re now working on a content valuation model, to try and see if we can predict what will make communities work better;
    We already know that training community managers and coaching them once they start are key.
    And we’ve identified some communities with real business value, particularly in the communities of practice and internal service channels.
  • The users came up with this tag for when something has worked in Buzz in a way that they think is better or faster than other means.
    In this case one person posted a question about something negative they’d seen on facebook, one of the experts is going to sort it out.
    In the email days this would have taken an email spaghetti to sort out – This was solved in a few days (granted it could get faster), in an open way.
  • Work is still social
    We still want some social interaction on Buzz; I strongly believe that if there is some of that social “glue” there you’ll find it easier to understand each other, and less likely to head to conflict if there is a disagreement.
  • There are communities for;
    Travelling
    Photography
    Running
    Art
    Bear tasting
    Our attitude was always – you chat at work, there’s a social glue element to every interaction, Buzz is the same. However! We don’t want it to be more than about 10% of the activity, and it hasn’t been.
  • I guarantee that you don’t know enough to guess where the best uses of your ESN will come from.
    I showed you the Kreta Community earlier – it supports a tool that supports lending officers when they assess loans. The people managing that tool started a community to talk to the users and found that there was a gap in supporting them.
    Pre- Buzz any issues were submitted to a central helpdesk, and the average time to resolve it was 8 days.
    They ran a pilot on Buzz, using it as a support tool, and the response time has dropped. We’re now measuring in hours.
    I would NEVER have known that this was a sepcific and valuable use of Buzz, even though I know colleagues helping colleagues was a good idea.
    There isn’t a single tidy case for using an ESN, it takes an array of uses, and you’ll only find those when you really let the users “own the platform.
  • Buzz at ING is the platform people use to collaborate and share knowledge
    It’s a success, now available to all INGers, and actively used by many.
    It was a tough challenge from day one, but I knew it was a success in a thousand tiny ways – all the measurements pointed to it, but it was more than that.
    It was the emails I would get that invited me to join a community on Buzz, it was people talking about what they’d done on Buzz, there was the guy in IT who told me he had no time for facebook but couldn’t work without Buzz.

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