24. victorian context

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  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • The Victorian Age Only connect ... New Directions
  • 24. victorian context

    1. 1. The Victorian Age (1830-1901) Sambourne House, London.
    2. 2. <ul><li>Victoria became queen at the age of 18; she was graceful and self-assured. </li></ul><ul><li>Her reign was the longest in British history. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Franz Xavier Winterhalter , The young Queen Victoria, 1842 1. Queen Victoria Only Connect ... New Directions
    3. 3. T he Victorian Age 1. Queen Victoria <ul><li>In 1840 she married a German prince, Albert of Saxe-Coburg. </li></ul><ul><li>They had nine children and their modest family life provided a model of respectability. </li></ul><ul><li>During this time Britain changed dramatically. </li></ul>Franz Xavier Winterhalter , The young Queen Victoria, 1842 Only Connect ... New Directions
    4. 4. 2. The growth of the British Empire <ul><li>England grew to become the greatest nation on earth  “The sun never sets on England ” . </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions British Empire throughout the World, 19th century, Private Collection.
    5. 5. 2. The growth of the British Empire <ul><li>British Empire included Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Africa, Kenya, and India. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions British Empire throughout the World, 19th century, Private Collection.
    6. 6. 2. The growth of the British Empire <ul><li>Great Britain imported raw materials such as cotton and silk and exported finished goods to countries around the world. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions British Empire throughout the World, 19th century, Private Collection.
    7. 7. 2. The growth of the British Empire <ul><li>By the mid-1800s, Great Britain was the largest exporter and importer of goods in the world. It was the primary manufacturer of goods and the wealthiest country in the world. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions British Empire throughout the World, 19th century, Private Collection.
    8. 8. 2. The growth of the British Empire <ul><li>Because of England’s success, the British felt it was their duty to bring English values , laws , customs , and religion to the “savage” races around the world. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions British Empire throughout the World, 19th century, Private Collection.
    9. 9. <ul><li>1832 : The First Reform Act granted the vote to almost all male members of middle-class. </li></ul><ul><li>1833 : The Factory Act regulated child labour in factories. </li></ul><ul><li>1834 : Poor Law Amendment established a system of workhouses for poor people. </li></ul>3. An age of social and political reforms T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    10. 10. 3. An age of social and political reforms T he Victorian Age <ul><li>1867 : The Second Reform Act gave the vote to skilled working men. </li></ul><ul><li>1871 : Trade Union Act legalised trades unions. </li></ul><ul><li>1884 : The Third Reform Act granted the right to vote to all male householders. </li></ul>Only Connect ... New Directions
    11. 11. <ul><li>Women’s suffrage did not happen until 1918 . </li></ul>The Rights of Women or Take Your Choice (1869) 4. The woman’s question T he Victorian Age Suffragettes Only Connect ... New Directions
    12. 12. Industrial revolution : factory system emerged; for the first time in Britain’s history there were more people who lived in cities than in the countryside. Technological advances : introduction of steam hammers and locomotives; building of a network of railways. Workers in a Tobacco Factory 5. Positive aspects of the age T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    13. 13. 5. Positive aspects of the age T he Victorian Age Economical progress : Britain became the greatest economical power in the world; in 1901 the Usa became the leader, but Britain remained the first in manufacturing. Only Connect ... New Directions Workers in a Tobacco Factory
    14. 14. <ul><li>Crystal Palace was built for the Great Exhibition of 1851 ; it was destroyed by fire in 1936 . </li></ul>6. Crystal Palace T he Victorian Age The Crystal Palace Only Connect ... New Directions
    15. 15. 6. Crystal Palace T he Victorian Age It was made of iron and glass , exhibited hydraulic presses, locomotives, machine tools, power looms, power reapers and steamboat engines. Only Connect ... New Directions The Crystal Palace
    16. 16. It had a political purpose  it showed British economic supremacy in the world. 6. Crystal Palace T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions The Crystal Palace
    17. 17. <ul><li>Pollution in towns due to factory activity. </li></ul>London in 1872 Homeless Boys (1880) 7. Negative aspects of the age T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    18. 18. 7. Negative aspects of the age T he Victorian Age Lack of hygienic conditions : houses were overcrowded, most people lived in miserable conditions; poor houses shared water supplies. Only Connect ... New Directions London in 1872 Homeless Boys (1880)
    19. 19. <ul><li>Epidemics , like cholera, thyphoid, caused a high mortality in towns. They came to a peak in the Great Stink of 1858. </li></ul><ul><li>This expression was used to describe the terrible smell in London, coming from the Thames . </li></ul><ul><li>The “Miasmas” , exhalations from decaying matter, poisoned the air. </li></ul>8. The “Great Stink” Caricature appearing on the magazine «Punch» in 1858 T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    20. 20. <ul><li>The Victorians were great moralisers  they supported: personal duty, hard work, decorum, respectability, chastity. </li></ul>9. The Victorian compromise T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions W. H. Hunt, The Awakening Conscience , 1853-4, London, Tate Britain.
    21. 21. <ul><li>‘ Victorian’ , synonym for prude , stood for extreme repression; even furniture legs had to be concealed under heavy cloth not to be “suggestive”. </li></ul><ul><li>New ideas were discussed & debated by a large part of society. </li></ul>9. The Victorian compromise T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions W. H. Hunt, The Awakening Conscience , 1853-4, London, Tate Britain.
    22. 22. <ul><li>The middle-class was obsessed with gentility, respectability, decorum. </li></ul><ul><li>Respectability  distinguished the middle from the lower class. </li></ul>9. The Victorian compromise T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions John Lamb, Victorian family portrait, 1879.
    23. 23. <ul><li>Decorum meant: </li></ul><ul><li>Victorian private lives were dominated by an authoritarian father . </li></ul><ul><li>Women were subject to male authority ; they were expected to marry and make home a “refuge” for their husbands. </li></ul>9. The Victorian compromise T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions John Lamb, Victorian family portrait, 1879.
    24. 24. John Stuart Mill and his ideas based on Bentham’s Utilitarianism. 10. Key thinkers T he Victorian Age John Stuart Mill Only Connect ... New Directions
    25. 25. Karl Marx and his studies about the harm caused by industrialism in man’s life. 10. Key thinkers T he Victorian Age Karl Marx Only Connect ... New Directions
    26. 26. Charles Darwin and the theory of natural selection. 10. Key thinkers T he Victorian Age Charles Darwin Only Connect ... New Directions
    27. 27. 11. The rise of the novel <ul><li>There was a communion of interests and opinions between the writers and their readers. </li></ul><ul><li>The Victorians were avid consumers of literature . They borrowed books from circulating libraries and read various periodicals. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    28. 28. 11. The rise of the novel <ul><li>Novels made their first appearance in instalments on the pages of periodicals . </li></ul><ul><li>The voice of the omniscient narrator provided a comment on the plot and erected a rigid barrier between «right» and «wrong» , light and darkness. </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    29. 29. 11. The rise of the novel <ul><li>The setting chosen by most Victorian novelists was the town . </li></ul><ul><li>Victorian writers concentrated on the creation of characters and achieved a deeper analysis of their inner life . </li></ul>T he Victorian Age Only Connect ... New Directions
    30. 30. 12. Poetry Alfred, Lord Tennyson : the most popular Victorian poet. He wrote narrative poems. T he Victorian Age Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson , by George Frederic Watts (died 1904), given to the National Portrait Gallery, London in 1895. Only Connect ... New Directions
    31. 31. 12. Poetry Robert Browning : he raised the dramatic monologue to new heights making it a vehicle for a deep psychological study. T he Victorian Age Robert Browning Only Connect ... New Directions
    32. 32. 12. Poetry Elizabeth Barrett Browning : she wrote love sonnets valued for their lyric beauty. T he Victorian Age Elizabeth Barrett Browning Only Connect ... New Directions

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