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CC Overview for North Georgia Technical College

TAACCCT grantee - overview of CC BY license requirement, Creative Commons and OER.

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CC Overview for North Georgia Technical College

  1. 1. Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) for North George Tech
  2. 2. Dr. Cable Green Director of Global Learning Jane Park Project Manager
  3. 3. 1. CC BY grant requirement 2. Understanding Creative Commons, CC BY, OER 3. Marking works with CC BY 4. Questions? Overview
  4. 4. What is the CC BY requirement in the TAACCCT grant?
  5. 5. Open Licensing Requirement for TAACCCT Rounds 1, 2 & 3
  6. 6. “as a condition of the receipt of a TAACCCT grant, the grantee will be required to license to the public (not including the Federal Government) all work created with the support of the grant (Work) under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY) license. Work that must be licensed under the CCBY includes both new content created with the grant funds and modifications made to pre-existing, grantee-owned content using grant funds.” SGA, Round 2 (p. 8 / Section I.D.5 )
  7. 7. FAQ: What if we are buying commercial content with grant funds? Do we have to license it CC BY?
  8. 8. “Only work that is developed by the grantee with the grant funds is required to be licensed under the CC BY license. Pre-existing copyrighted materials licensed to, or purchased by the grantee from third parties, including modifications of such materials, remain subject to the intellectual property rights the grantee receives under the terms of the particular license or purchase. In addition, works created by the grantee without grant funds do not fall under the CC BY license requirement.” Copyrighted materials clarification (p. 9)
  9. 9. FAQ: What if we have a mix of our own content plus proprietary licensed materials?
  10. 10. What is Creative Commons? What is CC BY?
  11. 11. http://creativecommons.org
  12. 12. 12 12 10.creativecommons.org
  13. 13. Here’s why we exist
  14. 14. C “sharing” by ryancr - flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033/
  15. 15. CC BY-NC-SA / by Judy Baxter: http://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/501511984/
  16. 16. CC BY-NC “fuzzy copyright” by PugnoM - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pugno_muliebriter/1384247192/
  17. 17. What do we do? We make sharing content easy, legal and scalable.
  18. 18. With Creative Commons, creators can grant copy and reuse permissions in advance.
  19. 19. How do we do it? Free copyright licenses that creators can attach to their works.
  20. 20. A simple, standardized copyright license
  21. 21. least freeLeast free
  22. 22. CC licenses are unique because they are expressed in three ways.
  23. 23. Lawyer Readable Legal Code
  24. 24. Human Readable Deed
  25. 25. <span xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"> <span rel="dc:type" href="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" property="dc:title">My Photo</span> by <a rel="cc:attributionURL" property="cc:attributionName" href="http://joi.ito.com/my_photo">Joi Ito</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creati ve Commons Attribution 3.0 License</a>. <span rel="dc:source" href="http://fredbenenson.com/photo"/> Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at <a rel="cc:morePermissions" href="http://ozmo.com/revenue_sharing_agreement">OZM O</a>.</span> </span> <span xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"> <span rel="dc:type" href="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" property="dc:title">My Photo</span> by <a rel="cc:attributionURL" property="cc:attributionName" href="http://joi.ito.com/my_photo">Joi Ito</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creati ve Commons Attribution 3.0 License</a>. <span rel="dc:source" href="http://fredbenenson.com/photo"/> Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at <a rel="cc:morePermissions" href="http://ozmo.com/revenue_sharing_agreement">OZM O</a>.</span> </span> Machine Readable Metadata
  26. 26. http://search.creativecommons.or g
  27. 27. 200+ affiliates. 74 jurisdictions.
  28. 28. Open Educational Resources (OER)Open Educational Resources (OER)
  29. 29. FAQ: What is OER?
  30. 30. OER: Teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.
  31. 31. CCBY“Atlas,it’stimeforyourbath”Woodleywonderworks http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/440672445/in/photostream/
  32. 32. Wikipedia: Over 77,000 contributors working on over 22 million articles in 285 languages
  33. 33. FAQ: How do we find OER?
  34. 34. http://open4us.org/find-oer
  35. 35. How do I add the CC BY license to my grant materials? JANE
  36. 36. Licensing your work is easy. No registration is required. You simply add a notice that your work is under CC BY. Here’s how you do that 
  37. 37. http://creativecommons.org/choose Go to our tool:
  38. 38. <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />This work is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License</a>.v This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. _______________________________________________________________
  39. 39. You can edit the text for your specific project. Go back to http://creativecommons.org/choose
  40. 40. Optional fields
  41. 41. <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br /><span xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/dc/terms/" property="dct:title">Welding 101</span> by <a xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" href="https://www.northgatech.edu/" property="cc:attributionName" rel="cc:attributionURL">North Georgia Technical College</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US">Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License</a>. Welding 101 by North Georgia Technical College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. _______________________________________________________________
  42. 42. What if I want to add the notice to a document? Go back to http://creativecommons.org/choose
  43. 43. Optional fields
  44. 44. Paste where you usually put © info
  45. 45. Examples 
  46. 46. Webpage: creativecommons.org
  47. 47. Document: Free to Learn Guide
  48. 48. Presentation: This one Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org
  49. 49. What about videos? photos? other media? We can help you. We’ll send you examples and assist you directly. Just email taa@creativecommons.org
  50. 50. My project is a mix of my own + third party works – CC licensed and proprietary. 1)How do I apply the CC BY license in this case? 2)How do I give credit to the third parties?
  51. 51. 1)Change the CC BY license notice to: Except otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
  52. 52. Then, make sure to note those materials that are governed by different terms. You can do this on a separate credits page at the end of the resource. Example 
  53. 53. You can also note it right next to the material. Example 
  54. 54. That depends. Is the third party material CC licensed or proprietary? If proprietary, give credit how you usually do. (We can’t tell you how to do this.) If it’s CC licensed, here are some tips!
  55. 55. When attributing a CC licensed work, use this acronym: ASL Author Source License
  56. 56. Example 
  57. 57. ASL Author(s) Source (link!) License (make sure it is linked to the right deed!)
  58. 58. thor ense urce
  59. 59. FAQ: Who do we put as the author of our materials (eg. consortium, college, faculty)?
  60. 60. Up to your consortium or college’s policy. Grant doesn’t stipulate.
  61. 61. FAQ: How do we credit the U.S. DOL as a funder of our materials?
  62. 62. See Section I.D.6 of the Round 2 SGA: Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables “The grantee must include the following language on all Work developed in whole or in part with grant funds…”
  63. 63. “This product was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The product was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.” Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables (p. 9)
  64. 64. This is separate from and has nothing to do with the CC BY license notice. You can include it in the same section where you usually add your disclaimers or notices.
  65. 65. More FAQs
  66. 66. FAQ: When are grant materials required to be publicly available?
  67. 67. At the end of the grant. Please consult your DOL federal program officer for details.
  68. 68. FAQ: Should our materials be in a final version before being made available?
  69. 69. They don’t have to be! We encourage sharing drafts to avoid duplicate efforts by other grantees.
  70. 70. FAQ: Can we change the license on the materials after the project has ended?
  71. 71. If it was created with grant funds, it must be under the CC BY license. Any future versions created without grant funds can be licensed separately, but must include attribution to the original CC BY licensed version.
  72. 72. FAQ: We are meeting resistance from faculty and others around opening materials. What steps can I take?
  73. 73. Remind them it is required by the grant! If that doesn’t help, we have talking points we can send you about the benefits of opening up publicly funded materials. Email taa@creativecommons.org.
  74. 74. FAQ: I can’t remember all this. Where can I go when I’m actually applying the CC BY license?
  75. 75. http://open4us.org
  76. 76. TAA@creativecommons.org
  77. 77. Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org

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