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Agenda
Topic Presenter
Time
(minutes)
Introduction of series Noel Gurwick USAID Office of
Global Climate Change
0-2
Livest...
July 9, 2019 USAID Webinar Series
Can we reduce GHG emissions from livestock?
Overview of the livestock sector in
East Afr...
Livestock in East Africa: By the Numbers
2X growth of regional
population and calories per person
by 2050, with increasing...
Kenya milk yields by cow http://www.fao.org/3/a-i7348e.pdf
Sources: FAO, FAOSTAT, Goopy 2017,
Otte et al. 2019
Eastern Africa contributes
9% of global
livestock emissions
Emissions ...
Livestock in the UNFCCC
Nationally Determined Contributions (2017)
Feasible low emissions development options for
livestock in East Africa• Improved forage for animal feed reduces
emission ...
Trade-offs: Feed and land use change for cattle
• Kenya has pledged to reduce GHG emissions by 30% by 2030.
• Improving fo...
Delivering results: livelihoods and mitigation
• Barriers: initial cost, poor information available to farmers and
extensi...
Climate finance opportunities
Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS)
Green Climate Fund (GCF)
Portfolio of over...
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Overview of the livestock sector in East Africa

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Presented by Lini Wollenberg (CCAFS, Low emissions development) on 10 July 2019. It was part of the webinar Can we reduce GHG emissions from livestock? A feasibility and investment study from East Africa. This is part of a webinar series presenting recent land use and climate research by the CGIAR and supported by USAID’s Office of Global Climate Change.
A recording of the webinar can be found on CCAFS youtube channel: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security.

Published in: Science
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Overview of the livestock sector in East Africa

  1. 1. Agenda Topic Presenter Time (minutes) Introduction of series Noel Gurwick USAID Office of Global Climate Change 0-2 Livestock in East Africa: An overview Lini Wollenberg, CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), University of Vermont (UVM) 2-7 8-10 Low emissions investment options for the dairy sector: the case of improved fodder production Polly Ericksen, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) 11-25 Understanding pathways toward low emissions livestock: Evidence from Kenya and Tanzania Todd Crane, ILRI 26-35 Questions for panelists Facilitated by Julianna White, CCAFS and UVM 36-57 Please put your questions in the question box
  2. 2. July 9, 2019 USAID Webinar Series Can we reduce GHG emissions from livestock? Overview of the livestock sector in East Africa Lini Wollenberg, CCAFS
  3. 3. Livestock in East Africa: By the Numbers 2X growth of regional population and calories per person by 2050, with increasing demand for meat and dairy In EA11 to 45% of of GDP is from livestock 70% of cash income is generated from livestock 132million cattle in East Africa 9% of global cattle population of 1.5 billion Sources: FAOSTAT, Goopy 2017, Otte et al. 2019 Million cattle Percent of total Ethiopia 61 46% Kenya 18 14% Uganda 15 11% Tanzania 26 9% South Sudan 12 20% Eastern Africa 132
  4. 4. Kenya milk yields by cow http://www.fao.org/3/a-i7348e.pdf
  5. 5. Sources: FAO, FAOSTAT, Goopy 2017, Otte et al. 2019 Eastern Africa contributes 9% of global livestock emissions Emissions are 2-6X higher than other regions of Sub-Saharan Africa 49% increase in livestock emissions in East Africa 1990 -2010 70% of emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa are from livestock, mostly cattle.
  6. 6. Livestock in the UNFCCC Nationally Determined Contributions (2017)
  7. 7. Feasible low emissions development options for livestock in East Africa• Improved forage for animal feed reduces emission intensity by • 8–24% on intensive and semi-intensive dairy farms in Kenya, • as much as 27% in mixed systems in Ethiopia. • Biodigesters reduce manure emissions by • 60–80% in intensive dairy farms of 4+ cows. • Improved manure storage reduces emissions up to • 90%. • Reducing chronic disease • reduces emission intensity due to increased productivity, though rates depend on the disease. • Reducing slaughter age while improving feed quality reduces emission intensity by • 40% for sheep and goats, http://cgspace.cgiar.org/rest/bitstreams/ 151418/retrieve
  8. 8. Trade-offs: Feed and land use change for cattle • Kenya has pledged to reduce GHG emissions by 30% by 2030. • Improving forage quality (Napier grass) and dairy concentrate supplements,  reduces emission intensities by 26%–31%,  also partially achieves the national milk productivity target for 2030 by 38%–41%,  shows high feasibility given the availability of arable land. • In contrast, maize silage in cattle diets increases emissions up to 10X from the land conversion required to grow more maize. Brandt et al. 2018 https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748- 9326/aaac84/pdf
  9. 9. Delivering results: livelihoods and mitigation • Barriers: initial cost, poor information available to farmers and extension services, a lack of public and private sector incentives, adaptation priorities • Women face additional constraints: lack of ownership rights and decision-making power, role confined to informal markets, and other factors. Best practice guide to socially and gender inclusive low emissions development in livestock Katie Tavenner and Todd A. Crane 2016 Social inclusion indicators (examples) • Gender of who in the household is registered with the producer organization/hub) • Gender of who in the household delivers the milk • Number of women in leadership positions/are board members Source: https://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/best-practice-guide-socially-and-gender- inclusive-development-kenyan-intensive-dairy#.XSU0ui3MzEY
  10. 10. Climate finance opportunities Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS) Green Climate Fund (GCF) Portfolio of over USD 5.23 billion with 111 projects in 99 developing countries. Kenya Dairy NAMA is under preparation • 430K farmers • 8.80 MtCO2e mitigation via • Increased dairy productivity • Energy efficiency in milk processing • Household biogas adoption

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