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Ogle UNFCC inventory reporting needs Nov 10 2014

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Presentation at workshop: Reducing the costs of GHG estimates in agriculture to inform low emissions development
November 10-12, 2014
Sponsored by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Published in: Science
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Ogle UNFCC inventory reporting needs Nov 10 2014

  1. 1. UNFCCC Inventory Reporting Needs, Collecting Data and Using this Information to Inform NAMAs and LEDS Stephen M. Ogle, Ph.D. Senior Research Scientist Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
  2. 2. National GHG Inventory Guidelines Estimation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks, OECD/IPCC 1991 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories 1995 1996 Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories 2006 2013 Supplement to the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories: Wetlands 2013 Good Practice Guidance & Uncertainty Management in National Greenhouse Gas Inventories 2000 Good Practice Guidance for Land-Use, land use Change and Forestry 2003
  3. 3. UNFCCC Reporting Requirements • Annex I Parties shall use the methodologies in the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, unless stated otherwise in the UNFCCC Annex I inventory reporting guidelines, and any supplementary methodologies agreed by the COP, and other relevant COP decisions (decision 24/CP.19) • Non-Annex I Parties provide biennial update reports (decision 2/CP. 17) • Use the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines, 2000 IPCC Good Practice Guidance, and 2003 IPCC Good Practice Guidance for LULUCF
  4. 4. Basis for IPCC Good Practice Guidance Result • Credible • Reliable • Useful Inventory • Documented • Assessed for Uncertain9es • Subject to QA/QC • Efficient use of resources • Uncertain9es reduced over 9me TCCCA • Transparent • Consistent • Complete • Comparable • Accurate
  5. 5. Basic Inventory Method Most sources can use defaults from IPCC Guidelines – Only “Key Categories” ( ~ 1 0- 15 Sources ) need use more detailed parameters G u i d e l i n e s Activity Data usually can be found in national or international statistics . O f f i c i a l S t a t i s t i c s “Key Categories” ( usually ~ 10 - 15 Sources ) account for over 95 % of a countries emissions , focus resources on these E m i s s i o n E s t i m a t e s = X Emission Estimate Emission Factor Activity Data
  6. 6. IPCC Tier Methods • Tier 1 is lowest level of methods – IPCC default equations and factors • Tier 2 is the next level of methods – IPCC default equations with country-specific emission factors • Tier 3 are the most advanced – Country specific method/equations and emission factors – Requires testing of method to demonstrate that the approach is an improvement over lower tiers • IPCC considers it good practice to use higher tier methods with key emission source categories
  7. 7. Ogle et al. 2014, Global Change Biology
  8. 8. Basic Inventory Method Most sources can use defaults from IPCC Guidelines – Only “Key Categories” ( ~ 1 0- 15 Sources ) need use more detailed parameters G u i d e l i n e s Activity Data usually can be found in national or international statistics . O f f i c i a l S t a t i s t i c s “Key Categories” ( usually ~ 10 - 15 Sources ) account for over 95 % of a countries emissions , focus resources on these E m i s s i o n E s t i m a t e s = X Emission Estimate Emission Factor Activity Data
  9. 9. Improve Activity Data Collection • Mine existing data including national statistics and data compiled by international organizations • Develop surveys that monitor practices across a network of locations, households, farms, etc. • Elicit expert knowledge through a survey of experts
  10. 10. Improve Activity Data Collection • Crowd-sourcing data collection to compile information on practices • Utilize geospatial data developed from remote sensing technologies or other sources – Could be combined with surveys in a phased sampling design Produced through USAID Project in Central America
  11. 11. Basic Inventory Method Most sources can use defaults from IPCC Guidelines – Only “Key Categories” ( ~ 1 0- 15 Sources ) need use more detailed parameters G u i d e l i n e s Activity Data usually can be found in national or international statistics . O f f i c i a l S t a t i s t i c s “Key Categories” ( usually ~ 10 - 15 Sources ) account for over 95 % of a countries emissions , focus resources on these E m i s s i o n E s t i m a t e s = X Emission Estimate Emission Factor Activity Data
  12. 12. IPCC Working Group: Update Emission Factors • Commission a scientific working group to develop emission factors through Technical Support Unit for the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Program through a synthesis of the literature and modeling • Factors should be officially reviewed and be given the IPCC “Stamp of Approval” – Allows country compilers to utilize them as specified in the guidance without having to defend the use of the new factors • Disseminate the emission factors through the IPCC Emission Factors Database Ogle et al. 2014, Global Change Biology
  13. 13. Ogle et al. 2013, Environmental Research Letters
  14. 14. Basic Inventory Method Most sources can use defaults from IPCC Guidelines – Only “Key Categories” ( ~ 1 0- 15 Sources ) need use more detailed parameters G u i d e l i n e s Activity Data usually can be found in national or international statistics . O f f i c i a l S t a t i s t i c s “Key Categories” ( usually ~ 10 - 15 Sources ) account for over 95 % of a countries emissions , focus resources on these E m i s s i o n E s t i m a t e s = X Emission Estimate Emission Factor Activity Data
  15. 15. Improve National GHG Mitigation Analyses • National inventories are compiled for reporting GHG emissions to the UNFCCC • Arguably the real value of these efforts is using the information to evaluate mitigation potentials and inform policy actions – Mitigation is part of the national communications that country’s submit to the UNFCCC • Inform policy development for LEDS and NAMAs Ogle et al., accepted, ACSESS Book Publication
  16. 16. Mitigation Analysis for South Africa • UNFCCC Eastern and Southern Africa GHG Inventory Capacity- Building Project • Developed the inventory in the Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory (ALU) software • Conducted a mitigation analysis for livestock and manure management • One mitigation analysis featured manure management • Option 1: 50% of manure currently managed in anaerobic lagoons is proposed to be managed in anaerobic digesters with 75% methane capture efficiency • Option 2: Same as Option 1 with 75% of manure managed in anaerobic digesters • Option 3: Same as Option 1 with 85% methane capture efficiency • Option 4: Same as Option 2 with 85% methane capture efficiency
  17. 17. Ogle et al., accepted, ACSESS Book Publication
  18. 18. Thanks for your attention! • Ogle, S.M., L. Buendia, K. Butterbach-Bahl, F.J. Breidt, M. Hartman, K. Yagi, R. Nayamuth, S. Spencer, T. Wirth, and P. Smith. 2013. Advancing national greenhouse gas inventories for agriculture in developing countries: improving activity data, emission factors, and software technology. Environmental Research Letters 8, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/1/015030 • Ogle, S.M., L. Olander, L. Wollenberg, T. Rosenstock, F. Tubiello, K. Paustian, L. Buendia, A. Nihart, and P. Smith. 2014. Reducing agricultural greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries: providing the basis for action. Global Change Biology 20:1-6. • Ogle et al., accepted, Developing National Baseline GHG Emissions and Analyzing Mitigation Potentials for Agriculture and Forestry using an Advanced National GHG Inventory Software System. In ACSESS book, Synthesis and Modeling of Greenhouse Gas Fluxes and Carbon Changes in Agricultural and Forest Systems to Guide Mitigation and Adaptation.
  19. 19. • New degree program focused on greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture and forestry • Provide training to a new generation of practitioners focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural and forestry systems • Offered at Colorado State University, Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability • Website: warnercnr.colostate.edu/mgma • E-mail: WCNR_ESS_Info@mail.colostate.edu

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