Loss and Damage Case Study CCAFS - ACPC Presentation

7,373 views

Published on

Dr. James Kinyangi, the Regional Program Leader for CCAFS, presented the findings of the loss and damage study. In his preamble, James pointed out that Mozambique is unique in Eastern and Southern Africa especially when it comes to understanding climate change and climate variability.
Preliminary results focus on impacts on crop production but livestock and fisheries are also recognized as key production activities. Major findings from the study reveal that flood and drought severely affected the households surveyed, with 86% of the households severely affected by flood while 84% of the households were severely affected by drought. Furthermore, despite adopting coping strategies, 48% of households reported that they still suffered the negative effects of flood, while 77% indicated that their coping strategies did not prevent adverse effects of drought.

Published in: Environment
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
7,373
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6,213
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Loss and Damage Case Study CCAFS - ACPC Presentation

  1. 1. Loss and Damage from the Impacts of Flood and Drought in Mozambique James Kinyangi, PhD Program Leader, CCAFS East Africa
  2. 2. Loss and Damage • Residual impacts that will not be addressed by adaptation • Acute in developing nations given their underlying vulnerability At the COP16 (decision 1/CP.16, paragraphs 25-29), Parties recognizes the need to strengthen international cooperation and expertise in order to understand and reduce loss and damage associated with the adverse effects of climate change, including impacts related to extreme weather and slow onset events.
  3. 3. Background ACPC as part of its 2012 work programme under “Assessment of Risks, Vulnerability and Impacts • Engaged with various institutions in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia and Mozambique • Collaborated with two case studies conducted by the United Nations University, Kenya and The Gambia.
  4. 4. 4 To investigate loss and damage from floods and droughts among rural households living near the Limpopo, Zambezi and Save rivers in Mozambique. Objective Contribute to efforts to bridge the divide between science and policy in addressing the social dimensions of climate change
  5. 5. Research Questions Specific questions • What are the impacts of climate change on the society? • How does the impact of climate variability vary across HHs? • How do HHs deal with the impact of climate variability? • What kinds of losses and damages (costs?) are incurred as a result of the impact of climate variability? • What kinds of losses and damages can be expected as a result of the impact of climate variability in the next two to three decades? • What can be done to reduce loss and damage from climate change and variability? How does the impact of climate variability on society lead to loss and damage among households (HHs) in the study area?
  6. 6. Three main zones • South - tropical dry savannah • North - moderately humid climate • Centre - prone to floods, tropical cyclones and loss and damage from the impact of flood and drought Study Area
  7. 7. • 303 households were interviewed in four districts • Primary and secondary data was collected using both qualitative and quantitative methods including; household survey, focus group discussions, key informant interviews Methodology District District population Province River Households interviewed Chibuto 191,682 Gaza Limpopo 57 Mabote 44,733 Inhambane Save 60 Caia 115,612 Sofala Zambezi 31 Mopeia 115,291 Zambezi Zambezi 155 total 467318 - - 303
  8. 8. • Main crops cultivated were maize, sorghum, rice and millet 93% 3%4% Trends in Crop Production (respondent %) Decrease No change Increase 99% 1% Main Purpose of Crop Production (respondent %) Consumption sell Results
  9. 9. The impact from flood and drought can be estimated to affect more than 99% of rural households, based on our survey data. Flooding and Drought
  10. 10. Flood and drought severely affected the households surveyed, with 86% of the households severely affected by flood while 84% of the households were severely affected by drought
  11. 11. Impact Flood (%) Drought (%) Total (%) Impacts on household Not affected 1 0.5 0.6 Moderate 13 16 15.2 Severely affected 86 83.5 84.2 Impacts on livelihood Crop production 100 100 100 Food prices 79 85 83 Livestock 31 37 35 Fishing 10 30 23 Houses/properties 37 1.4 12 Impacts of Flood and Drought on Household and Livelihood
  12. 12. 12 Impacts of floods and droughts
  13. 13. Household Coping Strategies Did drought affect household? 0.5% No 99.5% Yes Adverse effect on • Crop production = 100% • Food price = 85% • Livestock = 30% • Fishing = 30% • House property = 1.4% Adopted coping strategy? 10% No 90% Yes What did you do? • Looked for extra income: 71% • Other: 37% • Sale of properties: 37% • Rely on help from others: 33% • Rely on help from organisations: 32% How effective was it? • Still severe affects: 28% • Still moderate effects: 47% • No more negative effect: 22% • Situation improve: 2%
  14. 14. Did flood affect household? 1% No 99% Yes Adverse effect on • Crop production = 100% • Food price = 79% • House property = 37% • Livestock = 31% • Fishing = 10% Adopted coping strategy? 1% No 99% Yes What did you do? • Help from organisations: 78% • Looked for extra income: 59% • Other: 33% • Rely on help from others: 27% • Sale of properties: 27% How effective was it? • Still severe affects: 11% • Still moderate effects: 37% • No negative effect: 37% • Situation improved: 5.6% Household Coping Strategies
  15. 15. • Looking for extra income • Selling assets • Relying on help from others • Relying on help from organizations • Undertaking other types of coping strategies Despite adopting coping strategies, 48% of households reported that they still suffered the negative effects of flood, while 77% indicated that their coping strategies did not prevent adverse effects of drought Coping Strategies
  16. 16. • Strengthening existing attempts to increase adaptive capacity, such as diversification of livelihood activities. • The research community, policymakers, practitioners and communities need coordinated and planned actions to address vulnerability and loss and damage at community level • Creating a global institutional framework to address loss and damage with adequate mechanisms to benefit smallholder farmers in vulnerable countries • Linking science, policy and practice • Climate experts, policymakers and practitioners need to review risk reduction, risk retention and risk transfer tools in the context of loss and damage based on experiences from vulnerable countries like Mozambique. Conclusion
  17. 17. Thank you

×