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EXPLORING HOW TO UPSCALE    CLIMATE-SMART PRACTICES FROM                                                 Rainforest Allian...
WHAT DOES A CLIMATE-SMART LANDSCAPE LOOKLIKE?                          Restore Degraded   Protect Natural         watershe...
OBJECTIVES AND METHODS               Methods:               •   Consultative meetings, field visits, workshop             ...
FINDINGSWhat’s there now?• Sound structure, organization, management and  financing of Kenyan tea industry• Commitments fr...
THE BEGINNINGS OF A VISION FOR A CLIMATE-SMARTLANDSCAPE IN KERICHO    Harness existing sustainability commitments and grow...
CONSIDERATIONS FOR FUTURE PILOTING1. Not all landscapes created equal. Search for quick wins. Potential quick   win condit...
THANKS!Mark Moroge                                                       Rachel FriedmanProjects Manager, Climate         ...
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Planning for climate-smart agricultural landscapes: The case of Kenya’s Kericho-Mau landscape

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Ideas Marketplace presentation from The Rainforest Alliance and EcoAgriculture Partners. Presented at Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day 5 in Doha Qatar, 3 December 2012. http://www.agricultureday.org

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Planning for climate-smart agricultural landscapes: The case of Kenya’s Kericho-Mau landscape

  1. 1. EXPLORING HOW TO UPSCALE CLIMATE-SMART PRACTICES FROM Rainforest Alliance & FARM TO LANDSCAPE: EcoAgriculture Partners Mark Moroge & Rachel A CASE STUDY OF KERICHO-MAU Friedman 3 December 2012 ALL Day Doha, Qatar©2009 Rainforest Alliance
  2. 2. WHAT DOES A CLIMATE-SMART LANDSCAPE LOOKLIKE? Restore Degraded Protect Natural watershed and Habitats Rangelands Enrich Soil Carbon Climate-Friendly Livestock Systems Farm with Perennials 2
  3. 3. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS Methods: • Consultative meetings, field visits, workshop - coordinated by field staff • Desk-review • Guided by structured assessment tool Objectives: 1. Understand the operating context and existing activities to support climate-smart agriculture 2. Assess and suggest primary opportunities for upscaling adoption 3. Identify sources of finance to support upscaling, e.g. climate finance. 3
  4. 4. FINDINGSWhat’s there now?• Sound structure, organization, management and financing of Kenyan tea industry• Commitments from multinationals and Kenya Tea Development Agency (>500K smallholders) to achieve Rainforest Alliance Certification for sustainable agriculture• Coordination between multinationals and smallholders• High industry interest in addressing adaptationWhat more could be done?• Upscale climate-smart education and training• Optimize fuelwood consumption, sustainably manage eucalyptus• Support a ‘community of practice’ to transfer knowledge, technology 4
  5. 5. THE BEGINNINGS OF A VISION FOR A CLIMATE-SMARTLANDSCAPE IN KERICHO Harness existing sustainability commitments and growing global demand for certification to train hundreds of thousands of producers, while leveraging government and private sector investment to secure long-term implementation of these.Climate finance priorities…• Fill gaps to reinforce value chain investment in sustainable tea; layer adaptation/mitigation focus atop sound foundation – Reduce smallholder costs of adoption of climate-smart practices – Finance policy and coordination work across institutions and industry – Coordinate landscape scale adaptation planning, assessment tools 5
  6. 6. CONSIDERATIONS FOR FUTURE PILOTING1. Not all landscapes created equal. Search for quick wins. Potential quick win conditions include: • Landscapes dominated by 1-2 crops • Potential for aggregation/upscaling (e.g. cooperative structures) • Crops are key contributor to regional/national GDP (bellweather for investment potential) • Strong private sector engagement; existing/potential linkages to international markets • Functional and well-managed government institutions.2. Context is king – consult heavily with local implementors to ensure recommendations are practical. 6
  7. 7. THANKS!Mark Moroge Rachel FriedmanProjects Manager, Climate Program Associate,Program EcoAgriculture Partnersmmoroge@ra.org rfriedman@ecoagriculture.orgwww.rainforest-alliance.org www.ecoagriculture.org The Rainforest Alliance works to conserve biodiversity and ensure sustainable livelihoods by transforming land-use practices, business practices and consumer behavior.

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