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Prairie Rose School Division Using Summative Assessment Data to Set Goals
Purpose and Audience of MYA <ul><li>Primary purpose : to enhance student learning and engagement through classroom-based a...
Assessment Reform in Manitoba <ul><li>Assessment  for  and  as  Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Setting criteria that defin...
 
Popham:  Trans formative  Assessment <ul><li>Formative assessment is a planned process in which classroom assessment evide...
Why Use MYA Data? <ul><ul><li>To improve achievement in key areas for all learners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Key area...
ADOPT “SIMPLE PLANS” to create & sustain  LEARNING COMMUNITIES <ul><li>1.  DATA - informed (academic!) priorities </li></u...
Looking at Data in PLCs <ul><li>Simple Three Point Agenda: </li></ul><ul><li>identify strengths and needs evident in the d...
1. Identify Strengths and Needs Evident in the Data <ul><ul><li>Ask clear questions: What does the data tell you… </li></u...
 
 
 
 
Suggest Reasons for and  Give Context to the Results <ul><li>Has the assessment changed? </li></ul><ul><li>Has instruction...
Advanced: Suggest Reasons for and  Give Context to the Results <ul><li>Consider equity issues by blocking data </li></ul><...
Priorize Ideas for Improvement, Stating them as Achievable Goals <ul><li>Feed this process into  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dep...
What Data are Available? <ul><li>Data available from Manitoba Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enrollment data </li></ul></...
Vygotsky Zone of Actual Development Zone of Potential Development THE ZONE What a student can do independently now What a ...
On track for proficient Proficient Advanced 2% Consistently low performing 1% Alt Assessment Modify materials and response...
Wiggins: “Inevitable Adjustments” <ul><li>Write curriculum backwards starting at the big ideas and transfer tasks, and cre...
Wiggins “Inevitable Adjustments” <ul><li>Performance Analogies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Soccer coaches assess players at the ...
Wiggins: “Inevitable Adjustments” <ul><li>Coaches make priorities. If the content of the textbook IS the course, then you ...
Wiggins: Inevitable Adjustments <ul><li>Develop a “troubleshooting guide” that will help all faculty deal with inevitable ...
* Inconsistent Adapted from O’Connor Warren Nickerson. * 3 2 So far 2 Own ideas, some support 3+ Complexity; variety 2 Oct...
Cautions <ul><li>Consider where summative assessment data  doesn’t  yield a complete picture </li></ul><ul><li>Example: co...
Brownnell, M et al. (2004).  How Do Educational Outcomes Vary With Socioeconomic Status?: Key Findings from the Manitoba C...
Brownnell, M et al. (2004).  How Do Educational Outcomes Vary With Socioeconomic Status?: Key Findings from the Manitoba C...
Manitoba Kids at Risk <ul><li>Poverty - family receiving income assistance (14%)  </li></ul><ul><li>Having a teen mother (...
Children with High Risk Characteristics are Overwhelmingly Low Risk at Birth Source :  Roos, Noralou P, Marni Brownell, an...
Failure to Graduate within Six Years  of Entering Grade 9 Source :  Roos, Noralou P Marni Brownell, Randy Fransoo.  Invest...
Graduation Rates According to  Number of Grade 9 Credits (by Risk Groups) Number of Grade 9 Credits Source :  Noralou P Ro...
Distribution of average overall marks, 15 year-olds, by sex, 1999  Source: Statistics Canada.  Youth in Transition Survey,...
 
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Student Assessment

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Student Assessment

  1. 1. Prairie Rose School Division Using Summative Assessment Data to Set Goals
  2. 2. Purpose and Audience of MYA <ul><li>Primary purpose : to enhance student learning and engagement through classroom-based assessment processes. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audience = student / teacher / parent </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Second purpose : gather summative information about the levels of achievement in literacy, numeracy, and engagement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audience = parents / school / division / department </li></ul></ul>Source: Middle Years Assessment Policy.
  3. 3. Assessment Reform in Manitoba <ul><li>Assessment for and as Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Setting criteria that define success </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Giving and obtaining feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning next steps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assessment of learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides feedback to the school, division, and province so that appropriate supports for further learning are provided </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicates progress to stakeholders </li></ul></ul>
  4. 5. Popham: Trans formative Assessment <ul><li>Formative assessment is a planned process in which classroom assessment evidence of a student’s status is used </li></ul><ul><ul><li>by the teacher to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or by students to adjust their current learning tactics. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Why Use MYA Data? <ul><ul><li>To improve achievement in key areas for all learners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Key areas = “Guaranteed and viable curriculum” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To provide focus for school plans and professional development efforts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Goal-oriented, professional learning culture </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To address issues of equity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Using data to close the achievement gap </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 7. ADOPT “SIMPLE PLANS” to create & sustain LEARNING COMMUNITIES <ul><li>1. DATA - informed (academic!) priorities </li></ul><ul><li>2. GOALS: that are measurable / tied to an assessment </li></ul><ul><li>3. TEAMWORK that produces short-term assessment results </li></ul><ul><li>… Anchored by a </li></ul><ul><li>GUARANTEED & VIABLE CURRICULUM </li></ul>Source: Mike Schmoker www.nsdc.org TEAMWORK DATA GOALS
  7. 8. Looking at Data in PLCs <ul><li>Simple Three Point Agenda: </li></ul><ul><li>identify strengths and needs evident in the data, and suggest reasons for and give context to the results. </li></ul><ul><li>priorize ideas for improvement, stating them as achievable goals. </li></ul><ul><li>share ideas and resources for achieving the goal. </li></ul>
  8. 9. 1. Identify Strengths and Needs Evident in the Data <ul><ul><li>Ask clear questions: What does the data tell you… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>…about what students do well? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>…about where students are weak? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Make 3 – 4 observations about the data. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For example, “I notice that more than half (61%) of Prairie Rose students do not meet expectations for responding critically.” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 14. Suggest Reasons for and Give Context to the Results <ul><li>Has the assessment changed? </li></ul><ul><li>Has instructional practice changed? </li></ul><ul><li>What students factors are relevant to this data set? </li></ul><ul><li>What other factors may have affected results? Time? Staffing? </li></ul>
  10. 15. Advanced: Suggest Reasons for and Give Context to the Results <ul><li>Consider equity issues by blocking data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are there patterns by ethnic group or gender? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How are groups doing? Who is behind? Who is on target? Who is ahead? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do the data surprise you, or do they confirm your perceptions? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How might some school or classroom practices contribute to the successes and failures for particular groups of students? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How do we continue doing what is working and address what is not working for students? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source: Using Data to Close the Achievement Gap </li></ul></ul>
  11. 16. Priorize Ideas for Improvement, Stating them as Achievable Goals <ul><li>Feed this process into </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Department, school, division goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional Development plans </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SMART goals: Specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, timed. </li></ul>
  12. 17. What Data are Available? <ul><li>Data available from Manitoba Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enrollment data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Middle Years Assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grade 12 Standards Tests (individual scores, means, pass rates, feedback report) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Retention </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Data available at the school / division level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Male / female </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aboriginal, colony, EAL, or other subgroup status </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Geographic or feeder school data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Risk factors: In care, single parent family, social assistance </li></ul></ul>
  13. 18. Vygotsky Zone of Actual Development Zone of Potential Development THE ZONE What a student can do independently now What a student can do independently in future zone of proximal development What a student can do with scaffolded help from the teacher.
  14. 19. On track for proficient Proficient Advanced 2% Consistently low performing 1% Alt Assessment Modify materials and response formats Additional scaffolding? Many students here. Differs for each kid by subject. What can they extend?
  15. 20. Wiggins: “Inevitable Adjustments” <ul><li>Write curriculum backwards starting at the big ideas and transfer tasks, and creating cornerstone assessments, complete with task description and criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Design spiralling, scaffolded opportunities for performance and opportunities for feedback </li></ul>
  16. 21. Wiggins “Inevitable Adjustments” <ul><li>Performance Analogies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Soccer coaches assess players at the beginning of the season by watching them scrimmage and making notes about strengths and areas for development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marv Levi, football coach for the Buffalo Bills, doesn’t spend the first four weeks of the season on rules and skills. The Bills play football on Sunday, and every Monday the coaches watch game tape, noticing where adjustments need to be made to achieve the ultimate aim – a winning season. </li></ul></ul>
  17. 22. Wiggins: “Inevitable Adjustments” <ul><li>Coaches make priorities. If the content of the textbook IS the course, then you are unable to priorize. Until you sort out what the curricular priorities are, you can’t coach. </li></ul><ul><li>Most curricula identify critical thinking as a priority, but most assessment tasks are on the bottom end of Bloom’s taxonomy. </li></ul><ul><li>Match BIG IDEAS (economic protectionism vs. free trade) with TRANSFER TASKS (think critically) in a CORNERSTONE ASSESSMENT </li></ul>
  18. 23. Wiggins: Inevitable Adjustments <ul><li>Develop a “troubleshooting guide” that will help all faculty deal with inevitable problems with performance. For example, students do not use the process writing structures when asked to write independently, instead only writing weak first drafts. What adjustment will you make? </li></ul>
  19. 24. * Inconsistent Adapted from O’Connor Warren Nickerson. * 3 2 So far 2 Own ideas, some support 3+ Complexity; variety 2 Oct. 17 Group Inquiry 1 Restates opinions; no support 2 1 Undeveloped personal opinion 1 Critical response 3 3 Clear interp + support 2 2 Interpretation 2 1 Fragmentary 2 General sense Understanding Oct 13 Sept. 28 Sept 19 Sept 9 Shared novel Independ- ent novel (Lit Circle #1) Short non-fiction Poetry Reading and Response Achievement Evidence for Sept-Oct Legend Level 1 = Does not meet expectations Level 2 = Approaching expectations Level 3 = Meets expectations Evidence of Achievement for Grade 8 Reading Comprehension Student ___________________________
  20. 25. Cautions <ul><li>Consider where summative assessment data doesn’t yield a complete picture </li></ul><ul><li>Example: contrast the standards test results when students who wrote the test are compared to who should have written the test (next two slides) </li></ul>
  21. 26. Brownnell, M et al. (2004). How Do Educational Outcomes Vary With Socioeconomic Status?: Key Findings from the Manitoba Child Health Atlas 2004 . Winnipeg, Manitoba: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. Accessed 12/-Oct.-2007 online at http://umanitoba.ca/centres/mchp/reports/pdfs/ch.atlas.pdf p.6
  22. 27. Brownnell, M et al. (2004). How Do Educational Outcomes Vary With Socioeconomic Status?: Key Findings from the Manitoba Child Health Atlas 2004 . Winnipeg, Manitoba: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. Accessed 12/-Oct.-2007 online at http://umanitoba.ca/centres/mchp/reports/pdfs/ch.atlas.pdf p.6
  23. 28. Manitoba Kids at Risk <ul><li>Poverty - family receiving income assistance (14%) </li></ul><ul><li>Having a teen mother (17%) </li></ul><ul><li>Child in care or protection (17%) </li></ul><ul><li>31% of Children have at least 1 risk </li></ul>Source : Noralou P Roos, Marni Brownell, Randy Fransoo. Investing in At-Risk Kids: the Path to Increased Productivity and Decreased Social Costs. PowerPoint Presentation, January 31, 2008.
  24. 29. Children with High Risk Characteristics are Overwhelmingly Low Risk at Birth Source : Roos, Noralou P, Marni Brownell, and Randy Fransoo. Investing in At-Risk Kids: the Path to Increased Productivity and Decreased Social Costs. PowerPoint Presentation, January 31, 2008.
  25. 30. Failure to Graduate within Six Years of Entering Grade 9 Source : Roos, Noralou P Marni Brownell, Randy Fransoo. Investing in At-Risk Kids: the Path to Increased Productivity and Decreased Social Costs. PowerPoint Presentation, January 31, 2008.
  26. 31. Graduation Rates According to Number of Grade 9 Credits (by Risk Groups) Number of Grade 9 Credits Source : Noralou P Roos, Marni Brownell, Randy Fransoo. Investing in At-Risk Kids: the Path to Increased Productivity and Decreased Social Costs. PowerPoint Presentation, January 31, 2008.
  27. 32. Distribution of average overall marks, 15 year-olds, by sex, 1999 Source: Statistics Canada. Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A .

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