Economic development as framing           strategy for advocacy            Dispatches from Michigan                     CF...
Roadmap  Build common vocabulary  Examples from Michigan  Advocacy toolkit  Activity: Advocacy action  Discussion    ...
Map credit to Rachel Chadderdon, 2009                                               Ecology                               ...
Mapping our partnershipsOur successes are due to our longstanding partnershipsand commitment to working together on common...
Who’s in the room?               Public Policy             laws, regulations                 Community            relation...
Building common vocabularyIssue framingthe careful use of language or other symbols in public discourse.                  ...
Building common vocabulary Beyond “attract and retain” Economic development: The development of wealth to improve   commun...
Building common vocabulary    Advocacy coalitionspeople from a variety of positions who share a particular belief system—f...
Food and Farming in Michigan  Second largest economic sector    55,000 farms; 10 million acres in farming    $70 billio...
Examples and lessons from MichiganExamples & Lessons       Two successful Michigan strategies:         Increasing institu...
Examples and lessons from MichiganStart by identifying your goals…..      If economic development is identified as an     ...
Examples and lessons from Michigan   Farm to School – Economic impact  Michigan K-12 schools represent   about $200 milli...
Examples and lessons from Michigan   Farm to School – Success stories  Define “local”: Often a buzzword,   local does not...
Examples and lessons from MichiganFarm to School – Ann Arbor P.S.Timeline:   •  2006: Chartwells contract started district...
Examples and lessons from MichiganFarm to SchoolTalking to decision-makers  School Administration and School Boards    N...
Examples and lessons from MichiganHospitals and healthcareHealth Care Without Harm Pledge:  “Through food purchasing decis...
Examples and lessons from MichiganMichigan Green Health Care  Mission of Michigan Hospital Association (MHA): “…   establ...
Examples and lessons from MichiganSt. Joseph Mercy Health System                                          Recent change i...
Examples and lessons from Michigan           St. Joseph Mercy Health System                            “The Farm at St. J...
  State/locally funded, evidence-based public health   interventions to:    Increase physical activity levels    Increa...
Examples and lessons from MichiganDowntown Ypsilanti Farmers Market         The Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market began ...
Examples and lessons from Michigan     Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers MarketIn 2006, Growing Hope’s Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers...
Examples and lessons from Michigan     Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers MarketSnapshot of market impact•  Food assistance and in...
Examples and lessons from Michigan        Cottage Food BillIn 2010, Growing Hope helped advocate for the passage of the Co...
Examples and lessons from Michigan Lessons from the Great Lakes State  Clusters of local & regional efforts   building mo...
Our advocacy toolkit  Planned Advocacy  The Advocacy Continuum  An integrated advocacy plan allows for  rapid response to...
Our advocacy toolkitAdvocacy Action Plan  Frame  Fortify/Amplify  Know your Audience  Identify your barrier  Create a...
Our advocacy toolkitDiscussion
Thank you!                  http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-9807632-52.html             Amanda Edmonds, amanda@growingho...
Resources & ReferencesAnn Arbor Public Schools Wellness Policy:  aaps.k12.mi.us/aaps/boe.policies/boe_policy_5000_-_studen...
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Economic Development as Framing Strategy for Advocacy: Dispatches from Michigan - PowerPoint Presentation

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Economic Development as Framing Strategy for Advocacy: Dispatches from Michigan - PowerPoint Presentation

  1. 1. Economic development as framing strategy for advocacy Dispatches from Michigan CFSC Food Policy Conference Portland, OR – 20 May 2011 Deirdra Stockmann | Food System Economic Partnership Sharon P. Sheldon | Washtenaw County Public Health Amanda Maria Edmonds | Growing Hope Fran Talsma | Michigan Institute of Clinical Health and Research
  2. 2. Roadmap  Build common vocabulary  Examples from Michigan  Advocacy toolkit  Activity: Advocacy action  Discussion http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3228/2893011093_0e95119bbb.jpg
  3. 3. Map credit to Rachel Chadderdon, 2009 Ecology Culture and livelihoods Local Orbit Center St Joseph Eat Local Eat Mercy Health Fair Food Natural System Network Packard Health Arbor Center Brewing Company Ann Arbor Green Belt Ann Arbor Area Commission Community Foundation Living Stones Zingerman s Community Community of Ypsilanti Ypsilanti Health Coalition Ann Arbor Businesses Food Co-op Township Ann Arbor Township Small Farms Initiative Food Gatherers UM Health System Ann Arbor Community Action Health and fair access Chamber of Local Food Guide NetworkCity of Ann Commerce UM School of Arbor Public Health Food System Economic Repasts Present and Partnership Summer Youth Ann Arbor Parks Future (SELMA/SFSFI) Employment Program and Recreation Faith and Food Downtown Ypsilanti Washtenaw County Farmers Market Public Health Legacy Land Ann Arbor Farmers Conservancy Market Homegrown Festival and Local Food Summit People s Food Co-op Slow Food Huron Valley Ann Arbor Farm to School Collaborative Growing Hope Edible Transition Ann Avalon Arbor Giving Gardens (EMU) Washtenaw Community College Avalon Project Grow Community Housing Gardens Agrarian Adventure Local Table Campus Dining Services (UM) Project Healthy Schools Michigan Sustainable Foods Initiative (UM) Matthaei Botanical Gardens (UM) MSU Extension Cultivating Community (UM) Sustainable Ag. Working Grp (UM SNRE) Woman s Farm and Collaborative Garden Association program /initiative MSU Student Ann Arbor Ypsilanti (Ann Arbor Branch) Organic Farm Public Schools Public Schools Community and School Public education Garden Network Nonprofit Connection CS Mott Group for Sustainable Agriculture Creative Change Chartwells Food coding Organization coding Money Public service (MSU) Information / Educational Solutions Service other support For-profit Environment and stewardship Office space/land Foundation Formal Collaboration Informal collaboration/ share Student group key individuals
  4. 4. Mapping our partnershipsOur successes are due to our longstanding partnershipsand commitment to working together on common outcomes. Weinteract on too many levels and initiatives to name2001 Ypsilanti Health Coalition founded2003 Growing Hope founded; begins working with Washtenaw County Public Health, MSUE Extension2005 MI Dept of Community Health begins Building Healthy Communities grants Food System Economic Partnership founded2006 Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers Market founded by Growing Hope2007 Ypsilanti Healthy Food Access Initiative2008 Healthy Kids, Healthy Michigan YMCA Pioneering Healthy Communities2009 Food Gatherers’ Food Security study and plan U-Michigan’s MICHR funds pilot project with Growing Hope First annual Local Food Summit in Washtenaw County2010 FSEP Policy Committee founded
  5. 5. Who’s in the room? Public Policy laws, regulations Community relationships among organizations Organizational schools, work, social institutions Interpersonal families, friends Individual knowledge, skills Socio-ecological model
  6. 6. Building common vocabularyIssue framingthe careful use of language or other symbols in public discourse. -- Kosicki, 2008  Shapes the message  Connects issue to other issues  Influences interpretation of information  Examples:   The “death tax”   Change   “Advocacy group”What are some framing strategies for local food policy? http://jeffhayesfinearts.blogspot.com
  7. 7. Building common vocabulary Beyond “attract and retain” Economic development: The development of wealth to improve community well-being and quality of life by promoting investment, job creation and access to resources.Two models:http://avigroup.co/ http://www.msuorganicfarm.org/Attract and retain large-scale, Grow and support small-scale,outside investment inside investment
  8. 8. Building common vocabulary Advocacy coalitionspeople from a variety of positions who share a particular belief system—forexample a set of basic values, causal assumptions, and problem perceptions—and who show a nontrivial degree of coordinated activity over time. -- Sabatier 1988Coalition members include: Effective coalitions:  Local gov’t officials (elected and appointed)   Engage diverse partners  Nonprofit representatives   Build strong, reciprocal  Businesses relationships  Schools   Tell good stories about  Researchers successes and impact  Community members
  9. 9. Food and Farming in Michigan  Second largest economic sector   55,000 farms; 10 million acres in farming   $70 billion economic impact   1 million jobs (~25% of Michigan workforce)  Michigan Food Policy Council (2006)  Michigan Good Food Charter (2010)   C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Agriculture, Michigan State U.   Michigan Food Policy Council   Food Bank Council of Michigan
  10. 10. Examples and lessons from MichiganExamples & Lessons Two successful Michigan strategies:   Increasing institutional food purchasing using local/regional growers contributes to local economic development   Increasing access to local and healthy foods for the general population as well as low income, vulnerable populations drives economic development
  11. 11. Examples and lessons from MichiganStart by identifying your goals….. If economic development is identified as an important goal at the outset, programs will be developed with that priority. Goals:   Increase freshness and variety of foods   Stimulating the local economy   Building relationships between schools/ institutions and the local community   Increasing knowledge about local food system
  12. 12. Examples and lessons from Michigan Farm to School – Economic impact  Michigan K-12 schools represent about $200 million statewide spending on food.  On 2009 survey, 42% of food service directors (FSD) said they were already purchasing from Student enjoys fresh, local melon local producers from the school fruit & veg bar  If all schools spent just 5% on local food, school FSD’s would contribute $10 million to support local farmers/vendors and the local economy.
  13. 13. Examples and lessons from Michigan Farm to School – Success stories  Define “local”: Often a buzzword, local does not always need to cost more  Put control in hands of the FSD  Start small and expand efforts  Schools can approach food service purchasing using a “tiered” approach:   Produce from local/regional farmers   Other ingredients from state or regional grower/producers (beans, Bryant Elementary students show off pasta) their seed balls.
  14. 14. Examples and lessons from MichiganFarm to School – Ann Arbor P.S.Timeline: •  2006: Chartwells contract started district wide •  2006-07: Doubled produce purchasing (100% increase) •  2007-08: Additional 25% increase in produce purchasing as they instituted mobile fruit/vegetable bars  Strong local wellness policy (see link to toolkit) enhanced support for development of Farm to School and institutional food purchasing changes  Overlap in participation on Wellness Policy Committee and Farm to School Committee helped to keep momentum and direction consistent
  15. 15. Examples and lessons from MichiganFarm to SchoolTalking to decision-makers  School Administration and School Boards   Need specific examples of how Concord and Ann Arbor have elevated the conversation to these levels through changes to purchasing contracts and other school policy changes  School food service is the base ; build up from there!   Often FSD’s have the leeway to work within their existing budget to bring local fresh foods in;   Farm to School classroom content often follows and may require more formal integration with administration/school board; next steps are often school garden/hoophouse
  16. 16. Examples and lessons from MichiganHospitals and healthcareHealth Care Without Harm Pledge: “Through food purchasing decisions, the health care industry can promote health more fresh, good tasting and nutritious choices for patients, staff and the community. And by supporting food production that is local, humane and protective of the environment and health, health care providers can lead the way to more sustainable agricultural practices.”
  17. 17. Examples and lessons from MichiganMichigan Green Health Care  Mission of Michigan Hospital Association (MHA): “… establish a Michigan’s health care sector to improve the health and well-being of the state’s ecology and its citizens”  An innovative program: the A-Z Environmental Purchasing Campaign is a framework for participants to purchase and market Michigan food products  Build awareness of local food purchasing through on-site farmers markets
  18. 18. Examples and lessons from MichiganSt. Joseph Mercy Health System   Recent change in leadership led to signing on to “Health Care Without Harm” pledge (use of American Heart Association guidelines)   All foods in cafeteria labeled to display nutrient content; offer a $5 healthy meal daily   Purchasing produce from Four Seasons Produce Cooperative (Jackson County) Farmers Market at St. Joes John T. Greilick / The Detroit News   Importance of marketing and education
  19. 19. Examples and lessons from Michigan St. Joseph Mercy Health System   “The Farm at St. Joe’s”: a 4-acre farm with two hoop house structures (season extenders in Michigan) growing tomatoes, peppers and winter greens.   Produce sold at on-site Farmers Market (employees and visitors) and to hospital cafeteria (visitors and employees)The Farm at St. Joes   1500 lbs donated to low income families
  20. 20.   State/locally funded, evidence-based public health interventions to:   Increase physical activity levels   Increase fruit and vegetable intake   Increase tobacco-free environments  Use community health policy and environmental assessment and review community data such as:   Healthy Communities Checklist   Nutrition Environmental Assessment tool   BRFSS/Local data   www.mihealthtools.org
  21. 21. Examples and lessons from MichiganDowntown Ypsilanti Farmers Market   The Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market began in 2006 to bring better access to healthy food downtown, while providing outlets for local entrepreneurs and contributing to downtown revitalization.   Growing Hope manages the leads the market, with strong partnerships including:   Ypsilanti Health Coalition   Ypsilanti Food Co-op- Manages EBT/credit machine   Washtenaw County Public Health- Prescription for Health   MSU Extension- Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program   Fair Food Network- Double Up Food Bucks
  22. 22. Examples and lessons from Michigan Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers MarketIn 2006, Growing Hope’s Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market was thethird in Michigan to accept food stamps; now, over 60 accept them.A strong MI Farmers’ Market Association links these markets together andis a key peer support network.
  23. 23. Examples and lessons from Michigan Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers MarketSnapshot of market impact•  Food assistance and incentive programs represent 24% of market sales•  55% of customers report eating more fruits & veggies because of the market•  Market sales have risen from $8,000 in year one to over $100,000 per year•  There are 15,000 visits to the market on Tuesday afternoons May-Oct•  Vendors include rural and urban growers, bakers, crafters, et al, and the majority earn less than $25,000 a year
  24. 24. Examples and lessons from Michigan Cottage Food BillIn 2010, Growing Hope helped advocate for the passage of the Cottage Food Bill.  Bill allows direct-sale of food-safe items (baked goods, jellies) at farmers’ markets up to $15,000; helps new entrepreneurs overcome barriers to entry  Bill had been introduced several times before and had gone no where; in 2010 it was passed unanimously by state legislature  Framing during advocacy was that this is a win-win for urban & rural, bi-partisan could support  In July 2010, Governor Granholm came to Growing Hope to sign the bill into law!
  25. 25. Examples and lessons from Michigan Lessons from the Great Lakes State  Clusters of local & regional efforts building momentum for statewide efforts  Statewide efforts:   Michigan Food Policy Council   MI Food and Farming Alliance   MI Farmers Market Assoc.   MI Good Food Charter   C.S. Mott Group at Michigan State University   MI Hospital Assoc.   MI Community & School Garden Network Stars mark clusters of regional activity on food-based economic development
  26. 26. Our advocacy toolkit Planned Advocacy  The Advocacy Continuum An integrated advocacy plan allows for rapid response to opportunities as well as unexpected challenges.  The Message/Audience relationship
  27. 27. Our advocacy toolkitAdvocacy Action Plan  Frame  Fortify/Amplify  Know your Audience  Identify your barrier  Create an advocacy team  Budget
  28. 28. Our advocacy toolkitDiscussion
  29. 29. Thank you! http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-9807632-52.html Amanda Edmonds, amanda@growinghope.net Sharon Sheldon, sheldonsp@ewashtenaw.org Deirdra Stockmann, deirdra@umich.edu Fran Talsma, ftalsma@umich.edu
  30. 30. Resources & ReferencesAnn Arbor Public Schools Wellness Policy: aaps.k12.mi.us/aaps/boe.policies/boe_policy_5000_-_student#5700Growing Hope: growinghope.netFood System Economic Partnership: fsepmichigan.orgHealthy Kids, Healthy Michigan: michigan.gov/hkhmMichigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR): michr.umich.eduMichigan Good Food Charter & Campaign: michiganfood.orgWashtenaw County Public Health Department: ewashtenaw.org/government/departments/public_health* See the Toolkit for additional resources and references.

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