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Grant Resources
Development Research & Evaluation
Bay Area Public Charity & Foundation List for Funding of
Program Activit...
1. Foundation: Community Foundation Silicon Valley
60 South Market Street, Suite 1000
San Jose, CA 95113-2336
tel 408.278....
• Community Investment Grants: One-year general support grant awards of up to
$20,000 will be awarded to nonprofits workin...
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GWLN-FoundationList

  1. 1. Grant Resources Development Research & Evaluation Bay Area Public Charity & Foundation List for Funding of Program Activity & Special Projects Development Research & Evaluation For Global Women’s Leadership Network 5 December 2008
  2. 2. 1. Foundation: Community Foundation Silicon Valley 60 South Market Street, Suite 1000 San Jose, CA 95113-2336 tel 408.278.2200 Background: The foundation’s vision is to create a region whose residents lead the nation in their generosity, civic engagement, inclusiveness, and collaboration to address community needs. Its mission is to be a leader for philanthropy. As such, they catalyze community change, bring people together to solve problems, and are building a permanent endowment for future regional needs. Together with others striving to improve the local region, they work to address the problems and needs of its diverse community. To accomplish their mission, the Community Foundation holds as its core values the following: Focus on the Community They focus on anticipating the needs, listening to the concerns, and raising resources to serve the community around us. Provide Excellent Service They strive always to provide our constituents with superior service. Exemplify Integrity They operate in all respects with honesty and with openness. Embrace the Valley’s Diversity They seek to be accessible to and to encourage participation by all segments of our richly diverse community. Collaborate with Others They work closely with other organizations in setting and implementing a broad agenda to tackle community problems. GRANT AREAS and PROGRAMS: NEW GRANT MAKING STRATEGY AT CFSV Over the last 18 months, CFSV has reviewed its grantmaking programs to better serve their community with their limited unrestricted grant dollars. They surveyed grantees and commissioned the 2008 Santa Clara County Nonprofit Benchmark Study, which included a survey and focus groups. They see this new direction as an evolution and from the outset, recognize they will need to test and refine our strategies over the course of this year. There are three parts to the grantmaking strategy for Community Foundation Silicon Valley. Community Investment Program: CFSV’s cash grants program includes three grant programs designed to provide financial support and technical assistance to exemplary community organizations. In their work, they also strive to develop stories about the work of nonprofits to share with our donor advisors and broader community.
  3. 3. • Community Investment Grants: One-year general support grant awards of up to $20,000 will be awarded to nonprofits working in one or more of the following areas: Arts and Cultural Participation, Education and Lifelong Learning, Civic Engagement, and Self-Reliant Individuals and Families. There are four quarterly grant application deadlines for Community Investment grants. NEXT DEADLINE: February 1, 2008 and May 1, 2008. If planning to submit must attend Dec 13th grant application meeting in San Jose. • Neighborhood Grants Program: This once-yearly program provides grants of up to $5,000 and technical assistance to help resident-based groups conduct activities that improve neighborhood conditions or address issues important to their quality of life. The deadline for the next grant round is March 31, 2008. Grant guidelines, application instructions, and review process will be posted in October 2008 To apply to the above listed grants, the organization’s work must fall under the foundation’s current initiatives, which are Advancing the Arts Initiative, Young Readers – Future Leaders Early Literacy Initiative, and the HP Nonprofit Leadership Initiative. Board of Directors Greg Avis, Chair; Michael Patterson, Vice-Chair; Anne Yamamoto, Treasurer. Directors: Laura Arrillaga; Debra Engel; Kevin Fong; Narenda Gupta; William Johnson Steve Kirsch; Jeffrey Skoll; John Michael Sobrato; Erika Williams. General Counsel: .David Mitchell Grant Awards range from $5,000 to $75,000.
  4. 4. 2. Foundation: The David and Lucile Packard Foundation 300 Second Street Los Altos, CA 94022 (650) 948-7658 Background The David and Lucile Packard Foundation was created in 1964 by David Packard (1912–1996) and Lucile Salter Packard (1914–1987). David and Lucile Packard shared a deep and abiding interest in philanthropy. The Foundation provides grants to nonprofit organizations in the following program areas: Conservation and Science; Population; and Children, Families, and Communities. The Foundation provides national and international grants, and also has a special focus on the Northern California Counties of San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Monterey. The Foundation's assets were approximately $5.2 billion as of December 31, 2004. General program grant awards totaled approximately $217 million in 2004. The Foundation has a grantmaking budget of approximately $200 million in 2008. GRANT AREAS and PROGRAMS: The Foundation focuses in three key program areas: The Conservation and Science Program seeks to protect and restore our oceans, coasts, and atmosphere and to enable the creative pursuit of scientific research toward this goal. The Program makes grants to nonprofit organizations, supports the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and manages the Packard Fellowships for Science and Engineering. The Population Program seeks to slow the rate of growth of the world's population, to expand reproductive health options among the world's poor, and to support reproductive rights. The Program makes grants to nonprofit organizations. The Children, Families, and Communities Program seeks to provide access to publicly funded, high-quality preschool programs for all three- and four-year olds; to provide access to health insurance for all children that ensures them appropriate health care; and to provide access to after-school programs that promote positive youth development for all elementary and middle school-aged children in California. The program makes grants to nonprofit organizations and supports the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. Special Opportunities and Organizational Effectiveness Funds In addition to advancing Foundation goals in our three program areas by supporting nonprofit organizations and key institutions, the foundation also believes in the importance of flexible funding to address emerging
  5. 5. opportunities as identified by our Board of Trustees and seek to strengthen the organizational effectiveness of grantee organizations and the philanthropic sector through grantmaking. Local Area Funds The Foundation has a long commitment to local areas of historical importance to the Packard family. These include Pueblo, Colorado; Los Altos, California; and the broader four-county area of California encompassing San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties. We make grants in these local counties that advance the goals of our three programs and support various local arts and community organizations which offer important cultural and social services. Letters of Interest must be first submitted to Foundation in January, 2008. Board of Trustees Nancy Packard Burnett Carol S. Larson Donald Kennedy Franklin M. Orr, Jr. Susan Packard Orr Julie E. Packard William K. Reilly Allan Rosenfield, M.D. Robert Stephens Colburn S. Wilbur Trustees Emeriti Robin Chandler Duke Robert J. Glaser, M.D. Jane Lubchenco Dean O. Morton Frank Roberts Richard T. Schlosberg III Edwin E. van Bronkhorst Officers Susan Packard Orr Chairman Nancy Packard Burnett Vice Chairman Julie E. Packard Vice Chairman
  6. 6. Carol S. Larson President and Chief Executive Officer George Vera Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Barbara Wright Secretary and General Counsel
  7. 7. 3. Foundation: Arts Council Silicon Valley Background: Incorporated in 1983, Arts Council Silicon Valley is a private, nonprofit arts organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for Santa Clara County residents by supporting arts and culture throughout the county. As a grant making organization, the arts council provides funding, advocacy, marketing and fundraising services to small to midsize arts groups and artists. As the official state and local partner with the California Arts Council and the County of Santa Clara, the council is now the largest non-governmental arts council in the state. Over the past 12 years, Arts Council Silicon Valley has distributed nearly $7.0 million to local arts and cultural organizations, individual artists, schools and community groups. Arts Council Silicon Valley is dedicated to creating and fostering a dynamic local arts environment by providing funding, advocacy and technical support services to Santa Clara county's arts organizations and artists. Goals Arts Council Silicon Valley provides arts leadership and services in four key areas: 1. Awarding grants to small to mid-sized arts groups through their grants programs. 2. Technical assistance, fundraising training and marketing services. 3. Arts education for troubled teens and children age 0-5 years. 4. Advocacy on behalf of the regional and state arts communities, information, promotions and planning. Programs • Grants Programs - Organization Enhancement Fund, Community Arts Fund, Applied Materials Excellence in the Arts, Stabilization Grants Program, Artist Fellowships, and Director’s Discretionary Grants • Fundraising Support Programs - Music & Arts Campaign, ArtsChoice™ (workplace giving program), Silicon Valley Arts & Business Awards (ABBYs). • Youth Programs – ArtsConnect™, FIRST 5 Arts Grants Program • Arts Marketing Partnership (AMP) – a regional initiative to assist local arts organizations with marketing and audience development efforts. Community Arts Fund provides project support for arts activities reflective of our multicultural region, with an emphasis on encouraging small, community-based, volunteer-driven organizations. Through the Community Arts Fund, we seek to: • Recognize and encourage non-professional, volunteer activities as an essential part of the county’s cultural environment
  8. 8. • Support cultural activities which reflect the dynamic, diverse, and innovative character of Santa Clara County • Stimulate local support particularly at the grassroots level. Community Arts Fund provides grants to a maximum of $4,000 to organizations with total expenses of $8,000 to $100,000 in the last completed fiscal year. Completed applications must be received by 5:00pm on March 6, 2008.
  9. 9. 4. Foundation: The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation 2121 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650) 234-4500 Background: The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been making grants since 1966 to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. “Never stifle a generous impulse”, was a favorite saying of entrepreneur William R. Hewlett, who established the Hewlett Foundation with his wife, Flora Lamson Hewlett, and their eldest son, Walter B. Hewlett. Indeed, it was the personal generosity of Mr. Hewlett, who passed away in 2001, that has made the Hewlett Foundation one of the nation’s largest, with assets of more than $6.5 billion. The Foundation concentrates its resources on activities in education, environment, global development, performing arts, and population. In addition, the Foundation has programs that make grants to advance the field of philanthropy, and to support disadvantaged communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Foundation’s work is informed by three fundamental values: First, the Hewlett Foundation is concerned primarily with solving social and environmental problems. This requires that staff defines program objectives, grants, and other activities in terms of problems to be solved; identify indicators of progress and criteria for evaluating success; and be prepared to stay the course. Second, the solutions to serious problems are seldom known with anything close to certainty. The Foundation must therefore be prepared to experiment and take risks in its philanthropic activities. This, too, entails clear objectives and measures of success, without which staff cannot know how the risk eventuated. It also requires a willingness to acknowledge and learn from failures. Third, grantee institutions—nonprofit organizations and, in some cases, government entities—are essential partners in achieving the Foundation’s mission. This explains the high proportion of the Foundation's grants budget allocated to general operating support. It also implies a concern not only for the health of individual organizations, but for the fields in which they operate. Over the past few years, the Foundation has been able to steadily increase the total amount of its gifts and grants. In 2001, it distributed a total of $119,955,000. In 2002, that total increased to $195,221,736, and in 2003, the Hewlett Foundation made gifts and grants totaling $254,320,000 to 707 organizations. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation is wholly independent of the Hewlett-Packard Company and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation. Grant Areas/Programs: In 1996, the Hewlett Foundation launched the Neighborhood Improvement Initiative (NII) in response to the accelerating deterioration of many low-income urban communities in Northern California. The work of the Neighborhood Improvement Initiative is based on the idea that the most effective way to promote and sustain neighborhood revitalization is to work with the community to address the interconnected problems of unemployment, deteriorating physical infrastructure, and the limited supply of affordable housing.
  10. 10. Since 1995, the Foundation has invested more than $17.5 million in the Initiative and has leveraged more than $27.4 million in both public and private resources to promote improvement in neighborhood-level services, supports, and infrastructure to increase their responsiveness to community needs. Hewlett funding has provided support for the Initiative's key elements: • Community visioning and planning • Site administration and monitoring • Technical assistance and training • Reallocation of funds for neighborhood projects • Creation of data collection and project tracking systems • Documentation and six-month and annual site evaluations The Performing Arts Program is founded on the premise that the experience, understanding, and appreciation of artistic expression give value, meaning, and enjoyment to people’s lives. Its mission is to support artistic expression and its enjoyment through grantmaking aimed at the sustainability of high-quality San Francisco Bay Area organizations and to achieve this through the following broad objectives: • Stimulating increased access to and participation in the arts • Increasing exposure to and understanding of diverse cultural expressions • Enhancing opportunities for creative expression for both artists and audiences • Promoting long-term organizational health In order to reach these objectives, the Performing Arts Program has a strategy that includes: • Long-term investment through ongoing, multiyear operating support with the shared goal of artistic/programmatic vitality and organizational health • Use of mutually agreed upon, individually tailored incentives, when needed, to leverage organizational change such as endowment, capital, cash reserve, and challenge grants to enhance the stability of arts organizations • Addressing the challenges and opportunities that a fluctuating, highly competitive Bay Area real estate market has created for arts organizations that need affordable administrative, rehearsal, and performance space • Leadership role and participation in regional or national initiatives that affect Bay Area arts organizations and the field • Research and promulgation of field-wide best practices Accepting Letters of Inquiry for both programs in December, 2008 for January-February review and invite to submit proposal. Board of Directors Walter B. Hewlett Chairman Menlo Park, California Paul Brest President Stanford, California Steven Chu
  11. 11. Stanford, California Robert F. Erburu Los Angeles, California Harvey V. Fineberg, MD Washington, DC James C. Gaither Vice Chairman Hillsborough, California Eleanor H. Gimon Greenwich, Connecticut Eric G. Gimon Berkeley, California Mary H. Jaffe Portland, Oregon Herant Katchadourian, M.D. Stanford, California Richard C. Levin New Haven, Connecticut Jean G. Stromberg Washington, DC Grant Awards range from 2 million- $175,000. 6. Foundation: The Wells Fargo Foundation 550 California Street, 7th Floor San Francisco, CA 94104 (415) 396-3567 Background: Wells Fargo is proud to support organizations working to strengthen our communities. Through the efforts of their team member-volunteers and their contributions, they share their success within their communities by giving back to non-profits and educational institutions that address vital community needs and issues. All proposals are reviewed by an internal committee made up of employees and community representatives and remain anonymous. Wells Fargo makes grants in three primary areas: • Community Development Wells Fargo provides grants to organizations that help people and communities of low and moderate income in the areas of:
  12. 12. Affordable housing Training people to find and retain jobs Community revitalization and stabilization In addition, Wells Fargo promotes economic development by financing small businesses and farms that have gross annual income of $1 million or less or meet the size eligibility standards for the SBA’s Development Company Program. • Education Wells Fargo supports educational programs promoting academic achievement by low- to moderate-income students in pre-Kindergarten through the twelfth grade in the key areas of: Math and science Literacy History of the American West Grant applications from educational institutions and non-profits serving those institutions are considered. Grants are also considered for: Staff development of teachers and administrators serving low- and moderate-income students Programs that encourage school partnerships with parents and guardians, the business community, or the community in which the school is located • Human Services Wells Fargo considers support of social and human service organizations whose work primarily serves low- and moderate-income populations in the following areas: Child care Health services and education Assistance with basic needs Grant Award Range from $5,000- $75,000. Open deadline for submission of project proposal.
  13. 13. 7. Foundation: The Always Dream Foundation 1203 Preservation Park Way Suite 102 Oakland, CA 94612 Background: Founded in 1996 as a 501c(3), Non-Profit, Public Charity, Kristi Yamaguchi's Always Dream Foundation was established with one purpose in mind: to support organizations that have a positive influence on children. Since its inception, the Always Dream Foundation has purchased computers for an after-school mentoring program, provided "shopping sprees" for underprivileged children to purchase back-to- school clothing, organized Holiday parties for children's shelters and sponsored summer camp for kids with disabilities. The foundation’s continuing goal is to find innovative ways to provide funding for a diverse range of programs designed to inspire and embrace the hopes and dreams of children and adolescents. In order to support their funding activities, the Foundation produces several special events on an annual basis. Additional income comes from the development of corporate partnerships, allocation of endorsements and appearance fees, and individual contributions. Currently, the Foundation is seeking to develop innovative community and corporate partnerships with organizations located in California or Nevada. Consideration will be given to organizations addressing the unmet physical, educational, social, or cultural needs of children in traditionally under-served communities, including those confronting the challenges of physical or cognitive disabilities. They are in the process of identifying organizations possessing shared goals and complementary resources in some significant respect. We believe that the process of partnering can serve to focus goals, inspire participants and minimize administrative costs. The newly created alliance is positioned to touch many more lives within the community than either organization could on its own. Letters of inquiry are being accepted until December 2008. Grant awards range from $5,000- $25,000. Board of Directors President Kristi Yamaguchi Vice President Carole Yamaguchi Community Volunteer Chief Operating Officer Jim Adler Adler & Co Treasurer Gary Doi Bank of America, Retired Secretary Tom Fujisaka Community Volunteer Dean Osaki Co-Founder
  14. 14. Jan Yanehiro Community Volunteer Dale Minami Minami, Lew & Tamaki

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