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2015 CES Publicity Highlights as of 1.23.15

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2015 CES Publicity Highlights

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2015 CES Publicity Highlights as of 1.23.15

  1. 1. CES Publicity Highlights As of January 23rd , 2015
  2. 2. January 5, 2015 CES veteran sees everything tech coming together in 2015 Living in Digital Times founder Robin Raskin says she sees different technologies coming together for a better life at CES 2015
  3. 3. January 8, 2015 CES Robots: The 'Droids You're Looking For' Robots may not rule the world just yet. But, they are taking over the floor at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
  4. 4. January 7, 2015 (TT) US CES WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY
  5. 5. January 5, 2015 Top Tech Trends at Vegas Annual Gadget Fest More than 150 thousand tech innovators and gadget geeks are flocking to Las Vegas this week for the annual International Consumer Electronics Show. Hot trends this year include 4K TVs, drones and wearable technology.
  6. 6. This interview also ran on the following radio stations:
  7. 7. January 7, 2015 CES: Internet of things and more
  8. 8. November 13, 2014 CES Unveiled offers sneak peek at latest gadgets
  9. 9. January 8, 2015 Important Technology
  10. 10. January 15, 2015 Tecnología para mamas junto a Adamari López
  11. 11. January 7, 2015 5 stylish wearables you'll actually want to wear Not just cool tech—these wrist devices are fashion-forward too Form is gaining on function when it comes to wearable tech devices—at least that's what it seems, judging from the news at CES 2015. While the first smart watches and activity trackers were undoubtedly geeky, good old-fashioned fashion is making its way into this electronics category. After all, if it's a wearable, you should really want to wear it! Misfit's Swarovski Shine collection The new Swarovski Shine collection not only tracks your activity—you can also wear it to a dinner party with no shame. Misfit teamed up with the cut-crystal company Swarovski to bring the bling along with the tech, in the form of two new Shine devices—one clear, one solar-powered violet, each covered with a single faceted crystal—and nine generously bedazzled accessories. Just pop the Shine into whichever you're in the mood to wear. Like their predecessor, the new Shine devices track your movement and sleep patterns, and sync wirelessly with a mobile app to keep track of the data they collect. Accessories run from $70 to $150. Three introductory sets include two accessories each and range from $170 to $250. You can preorder at misfit.com. Want more on wearables? Check our smart watch reviews. Withings Activité Pop Photo: Withings Maybe you don't want to be instantly identified as a geek. Withings understands. The company's new Activité Pop activity tracker has the look of a traditional analog watch, but smart features lurk inside. Even better, it's relatively affordable, at $150 (the original Activité goes for $450). On the Pop's face are two hand dials: one to show the time, and the other to let the wearer know how far she's come
  12. 12. along in her daily activity goals; the Pop also tracks sleep quality and has a wake-up alarm. The company says the Pop can automatically recognize and tracks swimming and running. It's available now atbestbuy.com. XOO Belt phone charger XOO Belt At the Living in Digital Times FashionWare runway show, we saw some cool concepts for wearables, but the sleek XOO Belt is one of the more practical ideas: It holds up your pants and charges your phone! It's rated at 2100 mAH, enough to charge an iPhone 6 and then some, says the company. With its nice, simple design, you'd never know it's got that kind of technology built in. It's available to preorder now; two styles are available, at $125 and $155. Martian-Guess Voice Command smart watches Martian has been a force in the smart watch world for several years now, but it’s upping the fashion ante in a new partnership with Guess. These prototypes of the new watches, which incorporate Martian’s Voice Command feature, are indeed some very good-looking wrist-wearables—and another sign that design is being recognized as the important force in getting people to actually wear these cutting-edge tech devices. Anouk Wipprecht's Robotic Spider Dress OK, maybe not everyone would want to wear Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht's Robotic Spider Dress (which is powered by the Intel Edison Module); it's a little intimidating, not to mention rather form- fitting! But there's no question that it's pretty fabulous, especially when the spider legs spike up to protect the wearer in response to someone approaching too quickly. We predict you'll see lots of similar designs at Prom 2050 (on Mars).
  13. 13. January 8, 2015 LED dresses and sparkling wearables light up CES fashion catwalk LAS VEGAS — From jackets with built in GPS to LED-lit dresses that show your latest tweets, the tech world is trying its hardest to be fashionable. During WebMD's FashionWare Show at CES 2015, models wearing high-tech products aimed for the stylish strutted down the catwalk on a crowded Las Vegas convention center stage. The fashion show, which was hosted by Project Runway alum Nick Verreos, highlighted both eye- popping and conspicuous wearable technology, like a belt with hidden phone chargers and pieces from the Misfit Swarovski fitness tracker collection that counts your steps. Most wearables are notoriously unattractive and clunky, especially fitness trackers and smartwatches, but companies are making a big effort to slim them down and provide accessory alternatives that could be dressed up for a fancy evening. "Technology evolves quickly; just look at how big and clunky cellphones were and now they are so thin," "Technology evolves quickly; just look at how big and clunky cellphones were and now they are so thin," Verreos toldMashable. "There will eventually be less plastic and computer-like wearables and more high fashion pieces. We'll even see it on the runway." While some of the ensembles on the catwalk were in the flashy spirit of the fashion world, and not for casual everyday use, Verreos believes technology will come to clothing in a subtle, useful way. "Fabrics will eventually become high tech, too; a sweatshirt could become warmer and thicker in the cold and then lighter when you want it to," Verreos said. "You could control all of that by an app. There are all types of wearables that could really impact fashion."
  14. 14. Here's a look at the high-tech catwalk looks: • LED dress This dress is color sensitive. By touching any color to a sensor trigger at the top of the dress, the LED lights (which cascade across the fabric) change. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Earpieces The model wore Bluez 2 by Aftershokz wireless bone conduction headphones, which lets you listen to music without cutting out the outside world (so you can still hear what's happening around you). IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Augmented reality glasses
  15. 15. Wearing the Snapdragon-powered ODG R-7 glasses by Osterhout Design Group, the augmented reality eyewear lets you play games, watch movies and surf the web directly via the built-in screen and essentially floats before your eyes. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Connected belt The XOO Belt is a high-end accessory that charges your smartphone and other gadgets. It was designed in collaboration with British fashion house Casely-Hayford, a favorite brand of celebrities like David Beckham and Benedict Cumberbatch. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • CES Swag Suit This CES-inspired swag jumpsuit is made of materials found on the conference floor. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Headpiece
  16. 16. These glasses are designed to look like an augmented reality wearable, but it's not actually a working device. However, it represents the many high-tech headpieces coming to market that will let users get information and view content via the eyes and by voice command. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Notification dress This dress syncs up with your smartphone and displays incoming call alerts, social media alerts and other messages directly on the embedded screen. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Swarovski Misfit pendant The model is wearing a necklace from the Swarovski Misfit collection. The $99 Shine fitness tracker, which comes with a sensor-filled core — the part that houses the data that tracks daily activity — pops out of the wristband. It can then be placed into various Swarovski accessories, like bangles and pendants. Prices vary between $69 and $149.
  17. 17. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Vest with a message The MeU display is built into the vest and can send messages, show logos and feature LED messages (something you might see at promotional events). IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Samsung Gear S smartwatch The model is wearing a Samsung Gear S smartwatch, which comes with built-in 3G connectivity so it doesn't need a smartphone to work. IMAGE: CHRISTINA ASCANI/MASHABLE • Personalization This one-sleeved dress displays a falling pedal animation. While there isn't much use for having a display like this on a dress, it's all about personalization and adding personality to what you're wearing.
  18. 18. January 9, 2015 CES 2015: Hi-tech fashion at CES Hi-tech and high fashion have always been closely intertwined. And these days, being seen with the right gadget or using the right app is as important as knowing that stripes are out and dots are in or that beards are big and bushy this season. Elsewhere on the show floor, we've seen how companies are putting in a lot of effort to make wearable technology a little more inconspicuous than what's on offer right now. Could hi-tech fashion really break through? Technology reporter Zoe Kleinman went along to a fashion show at CES that demonstrated both some hi-tech clothes as well as some very advanced ways that they were made. Designed by Ultimaker, these shoes took 30 hours to print. The firm sells 3D printed garments and accessories online but also gives away free files for those wishing to print the designs themselves This Ultimaker dress is 213cm long and contains 191 panels of 3D-printed material
  19. 19. Designer Judy Tomlinson models her creation Zazzi - the rectangular screen can be turned into a necklace pendant, bracelet or ring. The screen is made of e-paper and while the display is a rather basic black and white it can display photos taken with the wearer's smartphone British designer Rainbow Winters used photochromic ink on this hand-rinted dress. It changes colour when exposed to UV light (including rays from sunlight) Ms Winters has also made another environmentally-activated dress. Instead of light, this puffball dress reacts to different sounds. Lots of the fashion garments displayed on the Fashionware catwalk at CES featured LED lights. Designer Robert Tu said the challenge was to make them brighter. "Power constraints are our biggest challenge," he said. "More bright equals more power.”
  20. 20. January 12, 2015 Meccanoid, SCiO Win 'Last Gadget Standing' at CES One of the most fun events at CES is the annual Last Gadget Standing competition, and this year's contest was no exception. There were a lot of engaging demonstrations, such as: Lenovo using a fork to write on its new Yoga Tablet 2 with AnyPen technology; 3D Systems' Ekocycle Cube 3D printer, which uses recycled plastic bottles to help make its filaments; and a karaoke singer who sounded a lot better performing "Bohemian Rhapsody" with the Singtrix karaoke machine with voice enhancements. The winning products had great demonstrations as well. The on-stage winner was Meccanoid (above), a $399 robotics building system from Meccano, the company behind Erector sets. It lets you build a 4-foot high humanoid robot (or anything else you can imagine with the kit) and then lets you program it to do all sorts of movements and sounds. On stage, a developer showed how you can use a model of the robot on a tablet to quickly program it to raise its hand and shout in excitement, and it was lots of fun. Meccanoid easily carried the votes of the people in the live audience, and it looks like it will be a great and educational tool.
  21. 21. The online winner was SCiO (pictured), a hand-held molecular scanner from Consumer Physics. Essentially, this is a small hand-held optical scanner – you shine a line onto an object using the device, and then a smartphone application can tell you details about the object, such as how much fat is in cheese, or how much sugar is in a piece of fruit. The Last Gadget demo included looking at cups of Coke and Pepsi, and correctly telling them apart. I can see some good applications for this for people who want to know the content of their food, or need to avoid certain chemicals; as well as a fun use of it just for exploring the world around us. There were lots of other interesting products as well, but these two were among those I'm most interested in taking a closer look at.
  22. 22. January 12, 2015 CES 2015: Which Will Be the Last Gadget Standing? One of my favorite events at CES each year is the Last Gadget Standing competition, where online and on-site participants vote for their favorite products. In this event, several judges and a popular vote determine the 10 finalists from a group of new technology products before CES attendees and online voters help crown the "Last Gadget Standing." The audience voice makes this exciting, and although the winners aren't always world-changing products, they are often neat gadgets. Last year's on-site winner was the Kwikset Kevo lock, while the winner of the online competition was Skulpt, a fitness gadget that measures body fat percentage and muscle quality (but is only now starting to ship limited units). Here's a history of the contest. I've been one of the judges for the past several years, along with a number of well-known tech journalists and analysts, and while I can't say the competition accurately forecasts which products will sell well, it's always a lot of fun. Here are eight of this year's finalists (the other two are new products that will be announced at the show): • Ekocycle Cube from Cubify (above) is a 3D printer that uses plastic filament made in part from post-consumer recycled plastic bottles, which is a neat idea. • Flir FX from Flir Security is a very flexible camera that can work as a Wi-Fi camera for outdoor monitoring, a wearable action camera for sports recording, or a dashboard camera. It has a four- hour battery and lets you access live video and operate the camera even if you're away from the Internet. None of the individual functions is new, but the combination is interesting. • Petziconnect from Petzila lets you see and talk to your pet when you're away from home and even dispense a treat. This is clearly aimed at dog lovers.
  23. 23. • The Phorus PS5 Speaker is a wireless speaker that combines a lot of features including both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi support and connections from a network media player or from online services. You can coordinate multiple units and use your smartphone as a remote. Again, the concept isn't new, but it's the combination of services. • The Ring Video Doorbell lets you see and talk to the person at your door, using your smartphone, from anywhere. It's a simple but useful idea. • SCiO from ConsumerPhysics is a pocket molecular sensor. With this device, you can point at something, such as a food item, and it will tell you about the item, at a molecular level, using a tiny spectrometer. It's an interesting low-cost variation of a high-end scientific tool, reimagined for a consumer audience and looks very cool. • Singtrix is a karaoke machine designed to make you sing better. It includes a microphone, stand, a device that lets you apply a number of vocal effects, as well as a speaker. An optional app gives you more music choices. I doubt it will help my singing, but it couldn't hurt. • V.ALRT is a wearable personal alert device that, unlike most products in the category, doesn't require a subscription. Instead, it communicates via Bluetooth with your smartphone, which automatically sends the help request using SMS messaging and GPS coordinates. An interesting option for seniors or children who carry a smartphone. Two additional products will be unveiled at the show. In the meantime you can find more information or vote for your favorites at the website, and you'll be able to see them at CES on Thursday, January 8 at 10:30 a.m. PST at the Las Vegas Convention Center room N255.
  24. 24. January 8, 2015 CES 2015: Jumpstart Your Health and Fitness With These Gadgets LAS VEGAS—Cutting-edge products for health and wellness help you stay in control of your body, and sometimes help your doctor keep tabs on you, too. It's an area that's grown so rapidly in the consumer tech space that the organizers of this year's CES put all the health and fitness companies into their own building, set apart from the TV and drone madness of the Las Vegas Convention Center. Over at the Sands Expo in Las Vegas, thousands of square feet of show floor space were dedicated to health, fitness, and wellness, everything from devices that monitor your baby to gear that keeps an eye on seniors' well being. Fitness trackers, those smart pedometers by companies such as Fitbit and Jawbone, were present in abundance, but other areas of health-tracking technology are emerging as well. Whether it's a smart Wi-Fi bathroom scale that records and tracks your weight or a brain-sensing headband that trains you to be calm, these devices are all theoretically improving the system in which we monitor and keep up our long-term health. Some of the devices I'm most excited to see are fairly nascent, and it's not clear yet whether or how they will fit into the bigger picture. A huge piece to the modern health puzzle is figuring out which technologies people are comfortable using, as they will need to be adopted on a massive scale to have much impact. For example, if a mother is comfortable wearing a heart rate and respiratory monitor as a tiny adhesive bandage on her chest when she's discharged from a hospital after surgery, perhaps she'll be comfortable sticking a similar, temperature-monitoring patch on her infant the next time the baby is sick. The more these medical, health, fitness, and even sports devices get into the mainstream, the more we'll see other companies playing around with similar ideas and advancing the state of preventive health care through self-monitoring, remote patient-monitoring, and other as-yet undiscovered ways to keep us living better.
  25. 25. Hit the slideshow for some of the most interesting health and wellness devices at CES 2015. 7 of 12 iSwimBand The iSwimBand may take the cake for device that makes me most skeptical at CES this year. The $79.99 sensor alerts you when a child has been underwater too long or has fallen into water, if you set the device up for a non-swimmer. It's compatible with iOS devices for now, and an Android app is reportedly on the roadmap. While the iSwimBand was introduced late in 2014, the CES news is that it now has a clip-on attachment and bands so it can be worn on the head or wrist. Call me a Debbie Downer for this one, but I can just imagine too many ways the technology could go wrong. A disclaimer on itswebsite thankfully says, "NEVER let anyone swim alone. Not intended as a replacement for diligent supervision." Hear, hear. 11 of 12 QardioBase Qardio is a health-technology company that makes at-home devices with design flair, and its new Wi-Fi bathroom scale and body analyzer, QardioCore, is the latest addition to the company's lineup. This sleek, white, round scale is made of a composite stone, so it's warmer to the touch than many metal and plastic scales, but more importantly, it shows you the information you want to see, which may not be a firm number. If you cringe at every pound or kilo, you can set Qardio to instead display an emoticon— usually a happy face—for your daily weigh-in, while still keeping precise records in a connected app. It's just that you don't have to look at your weight, BMI, and other measurements until you're ready. The scale also has a pregnancy mode for tracking weight. It will be available in the coming weeks for $149.
  26. 26. January 8, 2015 This Handheld Scanner Identifies Pills, Determines Calories and More LAS VEGAS – What if you could scan a piece of cheese to discover its caloric content or a stray pill to figure out if it’s a vitamin or your pain medication? It sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but it's a feat that’s already possible thanks to a tiny device called SCiO. After raising close to $3 million on Kickstarter last year, the company showed off a prototype of its molecular scanner this week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Since its time on Kickstarter the device has gotten even better. "SCiO’s current design incorporates more features and increased functionality than the original molecular sensor we promised," says Dror Sharon, CEO and co-founder of Consumer Physics, the company behind SciO. The device is about the size of your average Zippo lighter and scans food when you press a button its side. SCiO analyzes whatever you have it pointed at on a molecular level and then reports back its findings to the scanner’s app. Details include not only what something is but also its nutritional information. Image credit: Consumer Physics Since Kickstarter, SCiO has added a remote temperature sensor, a protective cover that pulls double duty as a calibration mechanism and a new light indicator on the activation button to let you know a scan is underway. “You don’t have to be a scientist,” says Sharon "Users can just follow their curiosity. The applications are truly endless and as SCiO grows and learns so will our users be able to scan more and more materials. “ That learning is an important piece of the puzzle. In order for SCiO to accurately scan something, it will need to have scanned it before and have the item in its database. Once it’s saved, it can always identity that item in the future. It can even tell the difference between Coke and Pepsi. The more people who use SCiO the greater that database will eventually become.
  27. 27. Image credit: Emily Price SCiO is currently available for pre-order on the company’s website with as estimated ship date of July 2015. Just the scanner is $249 while the device’s software development kit is $449.
  28. 28. January 7, 2015 9 New Fitness Gadgets to Help You Get Into Shape This Year LAS VEGAS – This is the time of year when many of us vow to get in shape. Luckily, the latest Consumer Electronics Show showcased a number of brand-new gadgets to help us get there. From trackers that help you monitor your mood, to a device that tracks how high you can jump, here are a few fitness-focused inventions headed your way in 2015. 1. Withings Activite Pop Image credit: Emily Price You’d be forgiven for thinking this new wearable is just a regular watch. Disguised as an analog timepiece, the $149 Withings Activite Pop tracks the number of steps you walk each day as well as the number of calories you burn and how long you sleep. You can set individual goals (for instance, walking 10,000 steps a day), and the watch will vibrate when you’ve achieved the goal. The Pop is expected to launch in February for iOS devices, with Android support to follow. 2. Belty Image credit: Shutterstock
  29. 29. Forget wearing a separate activity tracker -- Belty tracks your steps and holds up your pants. Even better, it adjusts based on how full your stomach is, so if you overindulge during a meal, it will loosen your pants for a better fit. Related: This App Will Make Your Next Virtual Meeting Awesome 3. Garmin Vivofit 2 Image credit: Vivofit The Vivofit 2 is a refresh of the popular fitness tracker Garmin released early last year. While it sports a similar look, the new version packs a few additional features under the hood. Now in addition to tracking your movement, the band will audibly suggest you get up and move when you’ve been sedentary for too long. There’s also a backlight to help you see the screen in the dark, and the device can last a full year on a single charge. At $129, the Vivofit 2 comes in a few different color and style options, with bands designed by Jonathan Adler. 4. AmpStrip Image credit: Emily Price Athletes use their heart rate to know when they can push a little harder during a workout and when they should back off a bit. Unlike existing heart-rate monitors that require bulky straps or watches, AmpStrip can be worn all the time. The tiny device is meant to be worn three to seven days at a time and offers accurate real-time heart rate info on your smartphone. The $149 monitor is up for pre-order on IndieGoGo now and plans to ship later this year. Related: Our Smartphones Have Changed Everything
  30. 30. 5. Gymwatch Image credit: Emily Price Gymwatch is like having a personal trainer in your iPad. The device’s app comes preloaded with hundreds of different weight lifting and gym exercises. Built-in videos show you how the exercise is meant to be done. Attach the band to your arm or leg, and give it a try for yourself. The app will track your workout and offer feedback on how you’re executing the move. 6. Connected Cycle Rather than strap a computer onto your bike to track your next ride, why not turn your bike into the tracker? Connected Cycle is a new set of pedals that can be attached to your bike. Sensors track your speed and the number of calories you burn on each ride as well as the route you take an incline of the terrain. Data is stored in the pedals (so no need to take your phone along for the ride), and transmitted to an app once you’re back home where you can track your riding stats over time. Related: This Self-Driving Car of the Future Doubles as a Living Room 7. Zensorium Being Image credit: Emily Price
  31. 31. Your mood can be just important to your health has how active you are. Zensorium’s Being smartwatch tracks your steps, heart rate and sleep like some other fitness trackers but goes a step further to track your mood throughout the day as well. Your mood is displayed as either “distressed,” “excited,” “normal,” or “calm” and tracked alongside your fitness data so you can see what might be stressing you out throughout the day and make positive changes. 8. iSet Watch Image credit: isetwatch.com iSet Watch is a smartwatch designed specifically for tennis players. The sports watch allows you to track the score of your match in real-time from your wrist. Scores can be transmitted to an app via Bluetooth while you play where friends, teammates or coaches can check in on the action from afar. While you’re playing, you can also check in on other match scores from your wrist. Once you’re done, stats are saved within the app so you can compare your performance and note your improvements over time. 9. Vert Belt Image credit: Vert Belt Now you can track how high you’re able to jump using your iPad. Vert Belt is a new wearable designed specifically for people involved in sports like basketball and volleyball. The app tracks how high you jump each time you feet leave the ground, and can track how often you hit the air. While useful for training purposes, the device can also be used by coaches who want to track the entire team at once and decide who might need a break.
  32. 32. January 12, 2015 The Consumer Electronics Show Needs A Rebrand What were the most exciting developments at International CES this year? It wasn’t the wafer thin TVs from Sony. Nor the curved ones from Samsung. Not even the augmented reality glasses from Osterhout Design Group rate. Each of these can be classified as simply the latest in the we-made-it- because-we-could brand of products that are seen every year at the world’s largest electronics show. They may be cool, but they’re the history of CES — not its future. The real advancements on display at International CES came from less predictable sources — and in less device-centric ways. First, several automotive brands including Ford, GM, and Audi eclipsed CES’s traditional tech companies by showcasing truly useful, truly breakthrough innovations. Mercedes’ introduced its F015 Luxury in Motion self-driving car while BMW introduced cars with 360-degree collision avoidance and parking assist. And, Mark Fields, Ford’s President and CEO. delivered a keynote address. Automotive companies brought exquisite designs, impressive technology stories, and elaborate displays to CES — and not a single free-standing gadget. Hardware also played second fiddle to platforms, interfaces, and new business models in the media solutions and business services promoted at C Space, a meeting and exhibition hub targeted to the marketing, advertising, content, and creative communities at CES. The Association of National Advertisers partnered with the Consumer Electronics Association to produce C Space, and as an indication of the importance of media at the show, the attraction was billed as one of the three zones that comprised CES. Executives from Google and Yahoo delivered keynotes and Amazon Media Group, Brightline, and the Onion were among the unusual suspects at the show. Other surprises at the show included Under Armour, Adidas, and NBC Universal, all signaling the mainstreaming of brands at the intersection of technology and sports and fitness. Digital health and fitness has been a growing presence at CES in recent years, but gadgets like Fitbit and Shine have dominated the news to date. This year the show welcomed its first mainstream sports and active lifestyle brand as a major exhibitor — Under Armour commanded a huge exhibit space and introduced UA Record, a health-tracking software that pairs with a host of wearable devices.
  33. 33. NBC Universal bowed Radius, a subscription digital video service featuring original branded fitness content like videos from celebrity trainers. And, Adidas headlined the FitnessTech Summit by announcing a partnership with Interactive Health Technologies targeted to improve the physical education of middle- and high-schoolers. The Consumer Electronics Show has a rich history in gadgets and gizmos, but given the range of companies and market sectors that now participate, the show’s future may no longer reside in electronic products. The most exciting, useful, and broadly appealing developments of tomorrow will be technology that is integrated into our existing products, our lifestyles, even our own bodies — and the value of technology will increasingly be derived from content and applications in addition to, or even in place of, products. The Consumer Electronics Show needs a more inclusive, expansive brand name to reflect the current reality and future potential of technological innovation. It has outgrown its hardware-centric identity. It’s time to rebrand CES.
  34. 34. January 9, 2015 KAPi Awards Honor Innovation in App-Based Learning The 5th Annual KAPi (Kids at Play Interactive) Awards ceremony was held at CES 2015 on Wednesday night. The KAPi Awards honor innovation in children's media; the judging panel is a mix of journalists, reviewers, and creators, who look objectively at the year in review and consider both formal nominees submitted through the KAPi website and any other title that has been released in the past year that fits the criteria of children's interactive media. This year, 12 jurors reviewed 400 titles, and ultimately two pioneers in children's media were selected for recognition alongside eight winning products. The Pioneer category honors influential figures in the realm of children's interactive media. This year, the Pioneer Legend award was given to Dean Kamen. He's best known for inventing the Segway, but also founded FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology). FIRST reminds creators to "put a little DAP (Developmentally Appropriate Practices) in your app!" Chip Donohue of the Erikson Institute gave his acceptance speech for the Emerging Pioneer award. He's advocated for years about the importance of using technology in early learning, and has recently published a book,Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years: Tools for Teaching and Learning. Out of the eight product winners, three titles are tablet apps, while two others work with apps to enhance gameplay and interaction. Of the eight product winners, three are tablet apps, while two work with apps to enhance gameplay and interaction. Osmo won KAPi's award for Innovation. With a tiny mirror and plastic stand, Osmo allows you to use real objects and any surface to interact with your iPad.
  35. 35. Osmo currently has three games available: Tangram, Newton, and Words, which ask you to use tangram tiles, letter tiles, or household objects to complete challenges on the iPad screen. Monument Valley is a critically lauded game for iOS and Android that won Best App for Older Children. In a world of M.C. Escher–like artwork, players guide a small girl over architecture that moves and changes. Optical illusions abound in this unique puzzler. A representative of LumiKids Park accepting the award for Best App for Younger Children. LumiKids Park won the award for the Best App for Younger Children. It's an interactive playground where kids can explore and practice cognitive, motor, and social-emotional skills in a text-free environment. LumiKids Park is intended for kids aged 2–5. Two other award winners are focused on robotics with app support on the side.Ozobots are small robots with optical sensors that follow colored lines and respond to a series of color-coded commands. You can use markers and paper to interact with Ozobots, or you can use the app for iOS and Android for more challenges. Ozobot's newest innovation, Ozobot Bit, won aReviewed.com CES Editor's Choice award this year, and the company also received KAPi's award for Best Robot. Moss won the KAPi award for Best Tech Toy. Moss allows you to turn mechanical cubes into working robots. The robots have sensors that respond to light, proximity, and more. There are a handful of apps for both iOS and Android that allow you to further control and develop your Moss robots. Other KAPi winners included Fantasia Music Evolved by Harmonix and Disney Interactive for Best Family Entertainment, CreatorBox for Best Maker Maker, and LeapTV for Best Hardware. KAPi lists many more honorable mentions on its website.
  36. 36. January 9, 2015 Gotta Get’em Gadgets: CES/ LAS VEGAS
  37. 37. January 9, 2015 CES: Walgreens, Qualcomm team up on devices that link to pharmacists LAS VEGAS — Walgreens is launching a line of connected blood pressure and glucose readers that automatically send user information to company pharmacists. The new product line is part of a partnership with Qualcomm Life, a health care technology company that provides the platform for the product line and will facilitate communication among devices and apps for the Walgreens loyalty rewards program. Qualcomm announced the partnership with Deerfield- based Walgreens this week during the Consumer Electronics Show, which ends Friday. Matter healthtech incubator adds 10 startup members; total now 40 The new devices — a wrist-worn blood pressure cuff, a traditional blood pressure cuff and a blood glucose meter — will directly feed into Walgreens' Balance Rewards loyalty program, which gives participants who engage in healthy activities points that they can use to make store purchases. Devices that transfer patient information to pharmacists will help monitor patients and reduce health care costs, said James Mault, Qualcomm Life's vice president and chief medical officer. “Half the battle with keeping people out of the hospital is making sure they take their medications and that they have the right medications,” he said.
  38. 38. Officials said the line will hit the market during the first half of this year. It follows Walgreens' partnership with health-information website WebMD to award loyalty points for logging healthy activities on the WebMD Healthy Target app. Walgreens, the nation's largest drugstore chain, now also offers a wearable touch-screen activity tracker tied to the company's rewards program. The device provides call, text and meeting alerts. It also provides reminders for action such as taking medication. Walgreens is using Qualcomm Life Inc., a subsidiary of Qualcomm Inc., to help it expand connectivity to other devices and apps. Executives from both companies discussed the collaboration during a Living in Digital Times session at CES on Thursday. “We want to give the customer the choice of using whatever device,” said Greg Orr, director of consumer digital health at Walgreens.
  39. 39. January 12, 2015 An appeal to make tech tools 'powerful opportunities for learning' People who express concern about tablets and other tech stunting children's development should embrace the educational and connecting opportunities they bring, said Chip Donohue of Chicago’s Erikson Institute, a graduate school in child development. All work, no play makes Fuhu one very successful, very intense company “Worries about screen time and how much time kids spend on screens, we need to pay careful attention to those concerns,” said Donohue, the institution’s dean of distance learning and continuing education and director of the school’s TEC Center. “But that's not a barrier to thinking about what do we do with those tools to make them really powerful opportunities for learning.” Donohue made his comments last week at CES in Las Vegas, where he received an award as Emerging Pioneer at the Kids@Play Interactive Awards program. “When you talk about very young children and technology, there's lots of emotion involved in people's reaction,” Donohue said. “I think we make assumptions about technology that are not necessarily true in the touch-screen case. An iPad can be a wonderful social experience and group learning experience, not a one-child-only opportunity.” Donohue addressed the issue in 2012 as co-author of a paper from the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media at Saint Vincent College. “Not everyone thinks it's a good idea that these devices are now here in kids' hands,” Donohue said. “We actually took a different position, which is the devices are here — kids are using them — and we need to figure out how to make that good news.” He also is editor of the 2014 book “Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years: Tools for Teaching and Learning.”
  40. 40. At Erikson, he said, educators are welcoming technological tools that “enhance social and emotional development that go right after what people say you can't do with technology — and provide teachers with great tools for communicating with parents more often.”
  41. 41. January 9, 2015 CES 2015 Preview: Wearable Tech to Help Keep New Year's Resolutions As 2014 came to an end, millions of those counting down the clock celebrated and proclaimed their resolutions for a healthier 2015. For the past five years, I have made that same promise to myself and have managed to become a little healthier each year. This year I want to take advantage of health and fitness trackers to help me reach and maintain new goals like never before. Whether you are an Olympic athlete or an average Julio, everyone can benefit from wearable tech. Jan 6-9, I will be attending International CES 2015 put together by the Consumer Electronics Association. This year there will be a lot of focus on fitness, technology and well-being with hundreds of exhibitors in the "health and wellness" and "fitness and technology" sections including Under Armour apparel, Fitbit, Wahoo Fitness, and Withings. One event that should prove interesting is by fashion designer and former Project Runway contestant Nick Verreos. He is hosting FashionWare, a live runway show featuring high-tech wearables. I am also very interested in attending the Lifelong Tech Summit, with topics like "longevity and genetics" and "connect like your life depends on it," where speakers will cover how technology will help us stay connected not only to family and doctors but also monitor our overall health and wellness. Back in 2008, the Fitbit Tracker was measuring steps taken and calculating how much we walked and how many calories we burned. Health and fitness trackers can do a lot more today, like monitor your heart-rate, even work with a scale to measure weight, body mass index and percentage of body fat. As these wearables improve, they are providing more meaningful data and making interaction available with smartphone apps and websites. Some smartphones are ahead of the game and have built-in health tracking capabilities. I am currently testing this out on my Samsung Galaxy Note 4. It has "S Health" built into it and includes a pedometer, heart rate monitor and options to track walking, running, hiking and more. Using my phone as a tracker makes it easy to set up goals and leverage other features my phone already has, like playing my favorite music while I workout. When it comes to eating, I can select from a list of food items and S Health automatically tracks calories consumed and available calories for the rest of the day. Also, if I place my finger on a sensor on the back of my Samsung Galaxy Note 4, the smartphone will measure the concentration of oxygen in my blood and my stress level. This will be interesting to see during one of the days running around CES. What Would You Like Me To Cover? For 2015, International CES organizers have created three different sections:
  42. 42. • Tech East: The Las Vegas Convention and World Trade Center, the Westgate Las Vegas and the Renaissance Las Vegas will host innovations in audio, automotive electronics, gaming, video, wireless devices and digital imaging. • Tech West: Sands Expo, The Venetian, The Palazzo, Wynn Las Vegas and Encore at Wynn will feature fitness and health, the Internet of things, sensors and other high-growth technologies like 3D printing, smart watches and robotics. • C Space: A new CES section for 2015, C Space at the ARIA hotel will be the hub for brand marketers, advertising agencies, digital publishers and social networks. While I want to spend a lot of time here to engage with folks from Google, NBC Universal, Adweek, Amazon Media Group and more, the reality is that you need all four days just to see Tech East!
  43. 43. January 9, 2015 Leaders from CBS, Cisco, Comcast And More Dazzle CES Keynote Stage Las Vegas, NV – 01/09/2015 – Day two and three of the 2015 International CES® featured top executives from CBS, Cisco, Comcast, Condé Nast, Fox, Google, McDonald’s, MediaLink and The Walt Disney Company on the CES keynote stage, as well as a candid discussion with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler on tech policy issues. Every major technology company from around the globe has convened in Las Vegas at the world’s top innovation event by exhibiting, speaking, sponsoring or attending. Owned and produced by the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)®, the 2015 CES runs through tomorrow in Las Vegas, Nevada. “The International CES has broken every record as wireless, sensors and the internet combine and entrepreneurs present innovations which enhance the human condition and solve problems in health care, transportation, safety and connectivity,” said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO, CEA. “The excitement of CES can be felt around the world, with more than 20,000 products launching at CES this week from 3,600 companies and breaking news from top global brands announced from the CES keynote stage,” said Karen Chupka, senior vice president, International CES and corporate business strategy, CEA. “With 2.2 million net square feet of exhibits, including 375 startups, the products unveiled at the 2015 CES will revolutionize the technology world and pave the way for the future of innovation.” For a second year in a row, Shapiro had a one-on-one conversation with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. The conversation covered online video service providers, Open Internet rules, paid prioritization, spectrum auctions and accessibility issues. Chairman Wheeler reiterated the need for a regulatory paradigm that encourages competition and innovation at the same time. “The old regulatory system doesn’t work anymore and we’ve got to have a new way of approaching that,” he said. Part of that paradigm, according to Wheeler, is ensuring innovators and consumers have open access to the networks. Wheeler laid out a timeline for his Open Internet proposal, confirming he would circulate an order to his fellow commissioners starting February 5, ahead of a February 26 vote. While he did not confirm support for Title II reform, he maintained the new rules will incentivize competition. Wheeler then turned to spectrum policy and expressed his disappointment that the broadcasters have slowed down the incentive auction with their recent lawsuit, but felt, as CEA does, that the request to delay is without merit. He said the auction will go on in early 2016 as planned. During the Fast Innovation: Disrupt or be Disrupted Keynote, moderator David Kirkpatrick, founder, host and CEO, Techonomy, led a wide-ranging conversation on the Internet of Things (IoT), data security and business practices that foster innovation.
  44. 44. Panelists John Chambers, chairman and CEO of Cisco; Neil Smit, president and CEO of Comcast Cable; and Werner Struth, chairman of Robert Bosch LLC, spoke openly about the need to innovate, reorganize and act nimbly as the IoT expands and more of the world is digitized and connected. Chambers believes that soon every business will be a tech company as everything connects to the IoT. “To keep up with the pace of change, companies can’t be afraid to think exponentially, in other words, think like a startup,” said Chambers. One of the biggest issues companies are grappling with as the IoT evolves is who owns the collected data. Smit said the principle of transparency is going to be critical. The Brand Matters keynote kicked off with MediaLink’s Chairman and CEO Michael Kassan having a one- on-one interview with CBS Corp. President and CEO Les Moonves. Their discussion focused on the opportunities for entertainment networks like CBS. “We have to create great content and get it to people in ways they want to experience it, said Moonves. “We need to make sure we make that content available to everyone.” He explained that CBS wants consumers to watch their content but is not concerned with where it’s watched. The two discussed how viewership tracking must be updated as consumer viewing habits change. “Eight-year-olds and 80-year olds matter,” said Moonves, explaining why the rapid growth in video consumption across all age categories should inspire advertisers to focus beyond the 18-35 year-old category. Their discussion was followed by a panel conversation lead by MediaLink President and COO Wenda Harris Millard with executives from Condé Nast, Fox, Google, McDonald’s and The Walt Disney Co. The panelists discussed how their “corporate DNA” dictates their distribution and personalization strategy. The panelists agreed that all good advertising strategy has to emanate from quality product and that mobile is offering unprecedented opportunities. Margo Georgiadis, president Americas of Google said that, “technology enables personalization and it should be like a toothbrush, something a lot of people use at least twice a day.” The Market for Smart Watches SuperSession, presented by CEA, was moderated by Tim Bajarin, president, Creative Strategies, with executive panelists from Basis, an Intel company, Motorola Mobility, Samsung and Yahoo. The panelists discussed design criteria, analyzed market potential and presented differing views on the idea of whether or not the smart watch needs a “killer app” to catch on with consumers. The panelists also placed a strong emphasis on “glanceability” and convenience, both being key characteristics of any smart watch. The idea of, “the network effect” emerged on the panel, suggesting smart watch value will be derived when whole families and friends can achieve unique, personal connections with each other that only a smart watch with sophisticated sensors can accomplish (e.g. the ability to send haptic messages of heart rate with other owners). Panelists concluded that the smart watch has a very diverse market potential. The Evolution of the Smart Home,Wednesday afternoon’s SuperSession, was moderated by Grant Clauser of Electronic House, and featured executives from Bosch Software Innovations, Lowe’s Home Improvement, Lutron Electronics and Yetu. The panel noted that security is the top feature driving growth in the smart home market. The panelists discussed the most effective methods of selling the concept of the smart home to consumers. All agreed that retailers must build an experience allowing customers to fully grasp the range of smart home capabilities. When addressing challenges in the smart home space, the panelists noted that manufacturers must create user-friendly and open systems to allow for ease-of-use applications across all platforms.
  45. 45. The C Space Headliner with iHeartMedia highlighted the many ways technology is transforming the media industry. Featured speakers were Ryan Seacrest, Host On-Air with Ryan Seacrest and Bob Pittman, chairman and CEO of iHeartMedia Inc. Both agreed that radio is far from being in decline and that Internet radio sites like Spotify and Pandora are no threat to the business. “Radio is America’s companion,” said Bob Pittman. “That emotional connection is why it hasn’t died. You know someone is on the other end of the line curating and putting together content for you.” They also stressed the importance of preserving the element of humanity in media since the very core of their business is managing relationships. Seacrest added, “You can’t think of radio as just radio, you have to think of it as everywhere. It’s connection, great content, engagement and emotion.” Alan Murray, editor of Fortune, interviewed Nick Woodman, president and CEO of GoPro at the Leaders in Technology Dinner at the Venetian. Woodman described the founding of GoPro as a way to capture his friends’ best surfing moments. He explained how Go Pro is known for its incredible content and for allowing people to capture and share their passions. “People don’t buy things, they buy solutions,” he said. Woodman explained how 6,000 video uploads of GoPro branded content were uploaded in 2014, a 40 percent increase over 2013, representing 2.8 years worth of content. “Storytelling is everything,” he stated. Day three of the 2015 International CES kicked off on Thursday with The Last Gadget Standing competition where attendees voted on the hottest gadgets of the 2015 International CES. Produced by Living in Digital Times, the competition was emceed by Jon Hein of the “Howard Stern Wrap Up Show.” Products ranging from molecular sensors to connected pet monitors and non-wearable sleep monitors to environmentally-friendly 3D printers faced off on stage with the audience being the final judge of what would reign supreme. In the end, CES attendees chose the MeccaNoid robotics building system from Meccano as their favorite. Much like an erector set, owners can build the four-foot tall humanoid robot which features built-in voice recognition. Next to MeccaNoid on the winners’ stage was the winner of the Online Voting competition, SCiO, the world’s first molecular sensor. This no-touch optical sensor can fit in the palm of your hand and can scan and detect what an object is made of and give information on it such as how much fat is in a specific type of cheese or salad dressing. Also emceed by “The Howard Stern Wrap Up Show’s” Jon Hein and produced by Living in Digital Times, the Mobile Apps Showdown followed the Last Gadget Standing competition and featured ten finalists. The mobile apps focused on everything from a wearable, portable and app-integrated breathalyzer, Breathometer, to Pure Imagination’s Perfect Bake app-controlled baking system and Fitnet’s fitness app that includes features like more than 200 free video workouts, webcam scoring and heart rate monitoring. At the end of the competition, the top prizes went to uCiC and Lyve App. uCiC (you see I see) is a location-based app that enables users to reach out to others in any area of the world to share pictures and video. Sharing the stage, the Lyve App also focuses on digital imagining. Lyve App allows consumers to gather, collect, organize, view, rediscover and protect their entire digital photo and video collection from any device and from any location. The app takes care of all the organization, creating a single library of photos and videos scattered across your multiple devices. The Extreme Tech Challenge (XTC) came to CES for its semi-final round of competition.
  46. 46. Ten startups in the areas of digital design, facial recognition, medical devices and applications, aerial robotics, automotive safety and DNA laser printing competed for the opportunity of a lifetime: to pitch Sir Richard Branson on his private Necker Island. The contestants delivered five minute presentations to a panel of guest judges including CEA’s Gary Shapiro; former CEO of Priceline Jeff Hoffman; Co-Founder and CTO of BioHeart Howard Leonhardt; Founding Partner of Pacific Investments and Innova Capital Veronica Serra; Head Monster Noel Lee; President of Monster Neal Bobrick; Tech Evangelist and Author Robert Scoble; and Scientific Advisor to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Dr. Boris Nikolic. The competition was emceed by XTC Executive Director Kym McNicholas. The three winners were Breathometer, an FDA-registered medical device which uses sensors to monitor alcohol consumption and detect halitosis, diabetes, asthma and various types of cancer, Wanderu, a ground travel aggregation platform and Doctor on Demand, an app which allows users to communicate with board certified physicians for non-emergency issues and therapy. IBM Watson also announced that XTC applicant Nextuser, a computing company, would accompany their team as the fourth competitor to pitch to Branson on Necker Island. Ford CEO Mark Fields awarded Bikee Bike, one of the 2,000 XTC applicants, with $50,000 and Boosted awarded Skully, a smart motorcycle helmet which competed in the semi-finals, with $1,000 for its massive social media presence. In a video address, Branson invited the other finalists, if they wished, to also come to Necker Island at their own expense.
  47. 47. January 9, 2015 The Most Stylish Things We Spotted at CES As a wise woman once (or… actually, DOZENS of times) said: “In fashion, you’re either in our you’re out.” Well, in technology, you’re in… and then you’re upgraded. So what happens when you combine those two worlds? We got a chance to see some of that firsthand at this year’s CES where some of our favorite wearable tech, stylish innovations and 3D printed you-name-it was all laid out in nice little booths in front of us. See some of our favorite fashionable finds below! 1. FashionWare Runway Show: We’ll put it plainly: The strides made in wearable fashion at this year’s CES didn’t come close to those made in wearable accessories. Garments at the FashionWare runway show, emceed by Project Runway alum Nick Verreos, largely remained conceptual in form and used technology as flashy embellishments (think: LED animation, sensors that respond to sound and light, and 3D printed embellishments) instead of the means to the end of something that truly signaled the future of fashion, or at least something that’s higher functioning than your average winter layer. But what was innovative about the FashionWare showcase was that it was one of the first times we saw look after look styled out with wearables that really rounded out each outfit, sartorially speaking. From sleek gold Cuffs worn with a date-ready maxi to Aftershokz Bluez 2 wireless headphones paired with a
  48. 48. fit-and-flare dress we can imagine being our go-to commute uniform, the styling tips were all pretty on point. Let’s hope this is a sign of what’s to come from Fashion Week. (Photos via @nickverreos) 2. Intel Edison Spider Dress: Why throw shade at a creeper when your dress can do it for you? That’s the idea behind the Spider Dress, the hands-down style show-stopper of CES. We mean, just look at it. But it’s not just a futuristic-looking feat: the 3D-printed armor is equipped with robotic, stinger-like limbs that strike to defend its wearer when it senses an aggressive motion. Created by Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht, who has dreamed up some of the most intricate “fashion tech” around, the skeletal bodice uses motion and respiration sensors to detect any physical invasion of personal space and monitor how calm the wearer is before it delivers its scary smackdown. In that way, the Intel Edison-built vesture is much more than a wearable. It actually acts as “the interface between the body and the external world.” Out creep the creeper? That’s one seriously smart dress. 3. iDerma: We’re really, really ready for our at-home pamper sessions to get a high-tech makeover of their own, something we can expect as early as June with the photofacial wearable iDerma. This full- coverage face shield uses the same pulsing, low-level light therapy just like the photofacial treatments you’d get at a spa to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, reduce pores and even out your skin tone in just eight weeks. Sure, the iDerma isn’t the most luxurious-looking beauty tool out there (the first prototypes are a little fencing helmet meets Stormtrooper mask) but the potential results — and money saved from booking pro appointments — are definitely worth the wear. You can snatch it on Indiegogo for a $99 pledge + $175 when it’s ready to ship. 4. Tory Burch for FitBit: IRL this collaboration felt and looked a little clunky on. Even a couple men standing by watching us eyeball the designs asked the million dollar wearable Q: “But, would you really wear that? Every day?” The answer was, “I’d wear it… some days!” The exciting thing about Tory Burch for FitBit (and FitBit in general) is that it shows you can stash the company’s activity tracker just about anywhere. While Tory’s cagey collaboration may not feel ideal for daily wear, let it inspire you, designers out there, to create collections on collections of similar jewelry.
  49. 49. 5. Chromat LED + 3D Printed Corsets: Refinery29 had luxe, Las Vegas living nailed with their very own pad for the week pimped out with inventions and tech innovations of the stylish variety. Hanging up in the suite’s dream closet were enough items to make a techy fashionista’s head spin completely off, creepy robot style. Our favorites were Chromat’s gorgeous 3D printed bras and corsets. In our dream world, we would have been wearing those and smiling to ourselves every time someone in the Sands showroom tried to mansplain to us what 3D printing was. We’re familiar, actually, but thanks. We also had our eyes on their LED corsets and headgear, yet these seemed slightly less wearable. But only slightly. (via @billiewhouse) 6. Ringly: We’ve slipped Ringly on our fingers before, but got to give it a real test drive at CES. The verdict? It took all of our strength not to walk out with one on each of our fingers, but we made it. The ring feels good, looks even better and its notifications are somehow calming.
  50. 50. 7. Opening Ceremony MICA: This wearable has been the chosen accessory for any and all sugar plum fairies dancing in our LED-lit dreams over the last few months, but we didn’t get a chance to test drive the tech part of this connected cuff just yet. Another wearable in the Refinery pad, this one was at least there to try on. Gorgeous, we confirmed, but its utility is still to be tested. 8. Panasonic Beauty Smart Mirror: Easily the most exciting, most futuristic tech we got to try out at CES was the Panasonic augmented reality smart mirror. We sat down in the beauty chair and realized that our reflections will someday be worth a thousand words as well. This prototype performed a skin check up on our dry, dessert/conference-parched face and tried to make us the fairest in the land with a full- on makeup trial that included fancy eyeshadow, lashes, a brow touch-up and a mustache for good measure. 9. 3D Printed Fashion In the Flesh/Filament: 3D printed fashion is happening, people. Seeing and touching it in out in the wild meant we were able to test how wearable said fashions are, and we’re happy to report that there are a few styles out there that would actually complement your curves. They still have the general look and feel of chainmail, but at least they move a little more like fabric. The most ready to “wear” fashion we saw was the Lost Luggage collection on display at 3D Systems’ massive booth. We totally could have used that weekender to stash all of our CES loot.
  51. 51. Ooing, ahhing and subsequently pinning a pair of 3D printed shoes is one thing, seeing the soles being made in front of you is, in all fairness, A LOT COOLER. We didn’t get to try any on, but we also have a lot of non-3D printed shoes that lack in comfort so can’t say that’s always our top goal when shopping. 10. Swarovski + Misfit: If that Tori Burch bracelet isn’t quite glamorous enough for you, these Swarovski wearables ought to do it. The legendary crystal company has teamed up with Misfit – an activity tracker that measures your daily activities and quality of sleep – on a line of jewelry. The next incarnation will even be solar-powered. Unlike the Tori Burch pieces this line offers a little more variety. Track your activity using a watch-like bracelet with a giant crystal as the face or with a sleek necklace with a ring- shaped pendant. These pieces range in price from $69 to $249 and are already available for pre-order. 11. Garmin + Jonathan Adler: Spunky home goods designer, Jonathan Adler has teamed up with Garmin on a collection of activity trackers preppy enough to add an extra spring in your step based on the design alone. The line, which is meant to include styles for both men and women, will offer vivid patterns and bold colors. Look at its pretty CES display case. The designs are created to fit Garmin’s vivofitand the newly announced vivofit 2. Both devices track steps, calories, distance and sleep, however the vivotfit 2 also includes a backlight and audible alerts. This collection is set to be available for purchase in the first quarter of 2015 and will set you back $139 for the vivofit 2 or $40 for vivofit.
  52. 52. King 5 News November 13, 2014
  53. 53. January 21, 2015 Highlights from #CES2015 Part 2- Products for Children’s Health and Safety The International Consumer Electronics Show was held in Las Vegas at the beginning of January and over 170,000 people from the Press and Electronics Industry visited the show and I was one of them. This is the second in a series of articles showing some of the new products that caught my eye during this year’s C.E.S. In the first article we highlighted products for the home with an emphasis on the Connected Home. Here we concentrate on products designed for kids. The show has a whole area dedicated to products for children but I wanted to focus on products that I feel could make a big difference in child health and safety. They include a safety alarm designed to prevent the tragedy of caregivers forgetting children and leaving them in hot cars, a GPS tracking watch designed for kids, a tablet that encourages kids to get up and moving whilst playing games, a Smart Toothbrush that not only encourages your child to brush with a fun game and rewards but also monitors and analyzes how they are doing and a wearable Bluetooth thermometer that allows you to accurately monitor your sick child’s temperature without waking them.
  54. 54. January 21, 2015 Sleep: The Biggest Loser at CES 2015 At CES 2015 the biggest loser was sleep. Collectively, I'd venture to say the 170,000 plus attendees lost at least one million hours of collective sleep (based on a two-day stay in Vegas). Whether they were in search of a pay-out slot machine or a hot new product, they were also bound to run into lots of products to help them find out how much sleep they were losing. In the fitness and health areas of the show floor, you couldn't move without bumping into a product designed to help you quantify your sleep. But measuring sleep is a bit ephemeral. There are two certainties. First is that you can get widely differing analysis of your sleep from different devices. And second, while they're getting better at measuring your sleep, they're pretty clueless about prescribing a remedy for the sleepless. The Consumer Electronics Show may be the extreme, but more than 25 percent of the people in the United States report not getting enough sleep, and about 10 percent of people have chronic insomnia. Researchers know that a lack of sleep leads to poor health often played out in mood disorders, obesity and cardio vascular issues as well as being more susceptible to illness. According to the National Sleep Foundation, 70 million Americans are dissatisfied with their sleep. As a matter of fact, the foundation is working with the Consumer Electronics Association to help create standards for measuring sleep and setting standards for sleep data collection. In Vegas where lack of sleep goes with the territory, I got to try out a number of products to both monitor the duration and quality of my shuteye and to even get some help upping my sleep quotient. The scene was very different than just one year ago, where sleep monitoring was mostly to the form of wearing a fitness bands or smart watches. This year, some of the more interesting products were non- wearables. They measure your sleep quality and duration from an unnoticed position under your sheets, atop you mattress. Withings undoubtedly has the largest ecosystem of products: from activity watches, to scales, to sleep monitoring, they can paint a broad picture of your health. The product they announced at the show, Aura, is designed to monitor sleep by attaching a sleep sensor to your mattress. Withings Aura is not alone. RestOn, from a company called SleepSpace, slips over your mattress like a belt and its app can monitor how many times you toss and turn, get out of bed or breathe unevenly. RestOn measures sleep time, heart rate, respiratory rate, body movement and sleep cycles and then through a synced Bluetooth connection, the SleepSpace App analyzes sleep data and provides users with some tips (like not drinking caffeine after lunch). Since my husband and I sleep together we were a bit confused about whose movements were actually being monitored.
  55. 55. Beddit, a similar non-wearable sleep monitor that fits like a belt on your bed comes from Finland and is similar to RestOn but its application is a bit easier to interpret. Beddit's apps scores how your night went each morning, in addition to giving you a breakdown of everything from snoring to respiration. It uses a technology called ballistocardiography (BCG) where an ultra-thin force sensor measures sleeper's night time activity. SevenHugs takes the concept one step further by monitoring an entire family's sleep at once. It has one central source and a number of additional sensors that can be placed under household bedding to monitor your entire family's sleep patterns. The only disturbing part of this? You'll get an alert when your kids wake up in the middle of the night, which can only mean less sleep for you. Even SleepNumber, the first mattress to recognize the importance of personalization, had its own version of a personalized mattress with SleepIQ, the x12 bed. The mattress tracks and monitors a person's sleep, offering adjustment tips to help them get a better night's sleep. By far the majority of the products are monitoring sleep, but a few are trying the high tech equivalent of a glass of warm milk. Sleep Shepard, a high tech bedcap, with built in earphones and sensors, monitors your brain and then delivers a special binaural tone -- almost a white noise that lulls your brain. [Sleep Shepard and SleepSpace pictured above] SleepSpace will accept reporting about your sleep whether it's a manual journal or a FitBit input and then offer recommendations and suggestions based on your patterns. At the moment, sleep wearables and non-wearables are still in their infancy. There is no one standard and each has their unique ways of measuring and relaying the data. For the moment, these sleep aids should be bought by those in dire need or those committed to the quantified self-movement. 2015 will be the year we spend learning about our sleep patterns and trying to change them for the better, but it's in 2016 that the software will evolve to really be useful. Robin Raskin is founder of Living in Digital Times (LIDT), a team of technophiles who bring together top experts and the latest innovations that intersect lifestyle and technology. LIDT produces conferences and expos at CES and throughout the year focusing on how technology enhances every aspect of our lives through the eyes of today's digital consumer.
  56. 56. January 19, 2015 You’ve got questions? uCiC hopes someone else has the answer Toronto tech firm Snapwise scores at CES with location-based app. Sukhsagar Singh presents uCiC at the Consumer Electionics Show, where the service won the Mobile Apps Showdown. Is there a big lineup at Burger’s Priest? Are there any Frozen Lego kits at The Disney Store in the Eaton Centre? What’s the scene like at the Drake Hotel? These are the kind of questions that the recently launched app uCiC (pronounced you see, I see) hopes to answer. Created by Toronto-based Snapwise Inc., which is co-founded by Sukhsagar Singh and Harleen Kaur, it is a location-based mobile app that allows people to make requests of each other, and get quick answers with a photo or short video back. “It is for anything that is real-time that you can’t find anywhere else, and the only way you can get that information is if you ask somebody who happens to be there,” explains Singh. “Let’s say you are going to the gym this evening. There is currently no way for you to find out if at a given hour if the gym is packed or not. You could call the gym, they could go check, but no gym really does that. What you can do is ask a stranger. So if someone is using this app, it will show you their location in real-time and you can write them a quick question and if someone using the app is there, they can take a picture of what it is like right now.” It is an idea that is already impressing people, as earlier this month uCiC won the Mobile Apps Showdown at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, which for this two-person start-up just coming out of stealth mode is a very auspicious beginning. Kaur is currently in Germany speaking to potential investors and the company plans to expand and staff up right away. Singh says the idea for the app came through a slow evolution, but that he was partly inspired by seeing the news report a few years ago about a fire in his neighbourhood.
  57. 57. “There was no way I could find out if my home was okay or not, but it would be very easy for someone who was across the street or down the block to tell me,” he says. “So I thought, wouldn’t it be amazing if you could reach out to another stranger who just happens to be at the location you are interested in? I was thinking about what tools you would need to do this, and basically everything you need would be contained in your average smartphone.” Of course, this app needs a critical mass of people using and contributing to it for the concept to work. To that end, every user who signs up get 50 Karma points, and they use 10 or more to make a request. “What we want to balance out is people asking and answering questions. So if you are only asking questions, you’re not giving anything back, you are not really very helpful or contributing, and it is not helping the community or the ecosystem,” he says. “What we want ideally is everybody to be available and to help other people out, because it takes less than five seconds of your time and three taps.” Singh says the company wants to build by focusing on specific locations, such as college campuses, to get a several users in a concentrated area. Other places he mentions it could work well are at festival settings such as South by Southwest and New York’s Fashion Week. Singh also says that since the app just launched, monetization is not a priority yet, but he does not want in-app advertising, and doesn’t want to compromise users’ private data. “Advertising, at least what the team feels right now, would get in the way. We just think at least at the very start, it definitely hampers the user experience and one of the guiding principles is that there has to be a net benefit for the people using it,” he says. “Someone who is using this app and answering questions for other people, we don’t want to do anything that person won’t like that may turn away from the app.” He says they have several ideas for making money, such as working with brands to use the app for contests, and there is value in the location-based data users will input. “The users will obviously become more apparent as we launch this app, because we do believe they will make of this what they want to make of it,” he says. “We have already seen all kinds of uses, like people asking questions to a user in Eastern Ukraine when the war broke out. And he was like, ‘Hey, look this is a picture of my neighbourhood. Things are calm, this is how people are feeling.’ So everything from journalistic uses to very fun, at the moment questions like, ‘Hey, I’m looking for the ice cream truck. Where is it right now?’ ”
  58. 58. January 19, 2015 You’ve got questions? uCiC hopes someone else has the answer © Provided by Toronto Star Sukhsagar Singh presents uCiC at the Consumer Electionics Show, where the service won the Mobile Apps Showdown. Is there a big lineup at Burger’s Priest? Are there any Frozen Lego kits at The Disney Store in the Eaton Centre? What’s the scene like at the Drake Hotel? These are the kind of questions that the recently launched app uCiC (pronounced you see, I see) hopes to answer. Created by Toronto-based Snapwise Inc., which is co-founded by Sukhsagar Singh and Harleen Kaur, it is a location-based mobile app that allows people to make requests of each other, and get quick answers with a photo or short video back. “It is for anything that is real-time that you can’t find anywhere else, and the only way you can get that information is if you ask somebody who happens to be there,” explains Singh. “Let’s say you are going to the gym this evening. There is currently no way for you to find out if at a given hour if the gym is packed or not. You could call the gym, they could go check, but no gym really does that. What you can do is ask a stranger. So if someone is using this app, it will show you their location in real-time and you can write them a quick question and if someone using the app is there, they can take a picture of what it is like right now.” It is an idea that is already impressing people, as earlier this month uCiC won the Mobile Apps Showdown at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, which for this two-person start-up just coming out of stealth mode is a very auspicious beginning. Kaur is currently in Germany speaking to potential investors and the company plans to expand and staff up right away. Singh says the idea for the app came through a slow evolution, but that he was partly inspired by seeing the news report a few years ago about a fire in his neighbourhood.
  59. 59. “There was no way I could find out if my home was okay or not, but it would be very easy for someone who was across the street or down the block to tell me,” he says. “So I thought, wouldn’t it be amazing if you could reach out to another stranger who just happens to be at the location you are interested in? I was thinking about what tools you would need to do this, and basically everything you need would be contained in your average smartphone.” Of course, this app needs a critical mass of people using and contributing to it for the concept to work. To that end, every user who signs up get 50 Karma points, and they use 10 or more to make a request. “What we want to balance out is people asking and answering questions. So if you are only asking questions, you’re not giving anything back, you are not really very helpful or contributing, and it is not helping the community or the ecosystem,” he says. “What we want ideally is everybody to be available and to help other people out, because it takes less than five seconds of your time and three taps.” Singh says the company wants to build by focusing on specific locations, such as college campuses, to get a several users in a concentrated area. Other places he mentions it could work well are at festival settings such as South by Southwest and New York’s Fashion Week. Singh also says that since the app just launched, monetization is not a priority yet, but he does not want in-app advertising, and doesn’t want to compromise users’ private data. “Advertising, at least what the team feels right now, would get in the way. We just think at least at the very start, it definitely hampers the user experience and one of the guiding principles is that there has to be a net benefit for the people using it,” he says. “Someone who is using this app and answering questions for other people, we don’t want to do anything that person won’t like that may turn away from the app.” He says they have several ideas for making money, such as working with brands to use the app for contests, and there is value in the location-based data users will input. “The users will obviously become more apparent as we launch this app, because we do believe they will make of this what they want to make of it,” he says. “We have already seen all kinds of uses, like people asking questions to a user in Eastern Ukraine when the war broke out. And he was like, ‘Hey, look this is a picture of my neighbourhood. Things are calm, this is how people are feeling.’ So everything from journalistic uses to very fun, at the moment questions like, ‘Hey, I’m looking for the ice cream truck. Where is it right now?’ ”
  60. 60. January 19, 2015 Wrap-up of the CES with amazing transforming technologies Technologies exhibited at CES that will impact the enterprise I reported earlier about the breaking records at the CES 2015. I was among the 170,000 delegates and 6000 media, judging the best mobile applications plus providing analysis as an invited industry board chairman by the US Embassy. This is a wrap-up of my experiences from the largest technology showcase ever! In talking with two noted executives and serial entrepreneurs who were showcased on the CES Wall of Apps for global innovation for ZAKA, I got a good sense of what technologies would impact the enterprise. I asked them what hot technologies and trends would profoundly impact business. David Cheng and Elim Kay are co-founders of ZAKA a social-based relationship management and referral mobile application and platform where you discover places through the people you trust—they reported these observation: Elim Kay reported: 1. Wearable Devices: “In my opinion, wearable devices present the next level tier of capturing categories of data on humans (e.g. state of the human bodies, external movements) which can be fused with currently captured data from mainstream sources (e.g. mobile devices). This aggregated data, coupled together with relevant learning engines, can provide richer depth and context which translates into increased precision in generating quantitative intelligence. The opportunities that result may produce huge upside to huge industries, not only healthcare but also retail, restaurants, hospitality, etc.” 2. Augmented Reality: “While augmented reality is still in a very early form, the future of augmented reality seems promising given the existing infrastructure of continuous advancement of humans’ digital behavior (and increasing precision of human-profiling by machines) that, in my opinion, is leading digital societies to eventually brace augmented realities in its eventual form(s). And I believe such forms will produce significant impact virtually across all industries.” 3. Drones: “The future of embraced utility of drones is wide as drones allow humans to extend their physical reaches at lower economical means. This concept of physical extension cuts across all industries. As drones begin to gain in maturity and eventually couple with advancing machines, a question is whether a balance can be achieved in which humans maintain being in control of extending physical reach while not becoming marginalized?”
  61. 61. David Cheng, also shared Elim’s thoughts and along with a couple of additional points: 1. More consumer friendly wearable devices: “This will have effects on the healthcare industry. The advancement in the last 12 months in the area is quite impressive. The healthcare industry have gotten pressure to move more toward maintaining a population healthcare versus treating them only when they’re sick. The very specific movement toward making the devices more consumer friendly by making it more affordable and fashionable should help drive the adoption of these devices. And with strong adoption, it can actually play a major role is shifting the healthcare industry toward wellness management and more consumer driven.” 2. 3D scanning and printing. “I believe this literally opens up a new dimension. Not only does this allow us to be more creative in what we design and create but it will probably open up new markets and opportunities. Real Estate developers can now easily build 3D models of their designs and inventors can actually “print” their inventions versus seeing it only on the screen (with simulations). It will be exciting to see when these devices becomes more affordable along with new advancements.” 3. Self-driving cars. “I believe this CES really is driving home the idea that a fully autonomous vehicle is here today! Which means production of the vehicles is not too far behind. Now imagine if they network all of these cars and be able to figure out (automatically) how to get everyone from point A to point B with full collaboration from every car! The stuff we’ve seen in sci-fi movies is actually here.” My hot trends and technology picks Cybersecurity Sony CEO Kazuo Hirai commented on cyber-attacks which underscored the reason why at the recent IFIP World CIO Forum where I participated as vice-chair, cyber security was a top enterprise priority. In addition, I was cyber-attacked while at CES. Mobile is particularly vulnerable and the pervasiveness of Internet of Things (IoT) increases the vulnerability dramatically. This is accentuated by comments at the CES where Samsung President and CEO of Consumer Electronics Boo-Keun Yoon indicated “The Internet of Things is about people, not things,” and by 2020, all Samsung devices will be connected to the IoT. Smart sensors everywhere I was struck by the proliferation of intelligent smart sensors and processors in products and services backed by machine learning, deep learning, AI, and usable analytics. These are the early signs of the digital quake where over 80 percent of businesses and jobs will need to change by 2020 or massive disruptive failures will occur. There are such rapid advances in deep learning where machines mimic human neural networks that enterprises need to plan for this now. Canada is a leader with the work of Geoffrey Hinton at the University of Toronto, who is advising Google, and Yoshua Bengio at the University of Montreal. Another pioneer is Yann Lecun supporting Facebook. Microsoft has made tremendous strides with embedded AI tools in their Azure cloud, Adam innovation, predictive analytics such as in Bing and universal translator in Skype.
  62. 62. The most obvious evidence is in autonomous devices. Dr. Dieter Zetsche, chairman of the Board, Daimler AG stated “Mercedes aims to develop truly superhuman autonomous driving ability” evidenced in the company’s new concept car F 015 which can drive itself, has seats that can face each other, possesses a brain for sensing pedestrians, features gesture and eye tracking control with free floating driving instruments. Zetsche noted issues such a liability in the case of an unavoidable accidents but commented that self-driving cars will help us to achieve “the dream of freedom and mobility.” Other hot technologies – Toshiba’s talking ChihiraAico robot demonstrates the rapid strides being made and the tidal wave of robotic replacements for people. Another example is MeccaNoid a new robotics building system from Meccano that comes with built-in voice recognition, conversations, and users can create their own custom robot movements. – Devices which cost millions or hundreds of thousands will all be available at modest prices and this will profoundly shift resources in enterprises. An example at CES was SCiO, the world’s first molecular sensor that is smaller than a computer mouse. A live demonstration had SCiO non-invasively giving the calorie count from a newly opened package of a food product, identifying medications, taking the drink challenge of identifying Pepsi from Coke. As noted on the CES Last Gadget Standing web page, “each time you scan an item you help build the world’s first database of physical matter. That new database has tremendous implications on food, research, health care and our environment. The data that SCiO collects will be a great leap forward for human knowledge of the physical universe.” – The ability to transform in real-time was evidenced in a product Singtrix® from the creators of the original Guitar Hero®. This foreshadows more to come that will influence customer engagement and marketing for enterprises. The product allows you to sound like your favorite star, even sound like a guitar with hundreds of vocal effects, live backup harmonies and pitch-correction. In the same vein for marketing usage was 360fly, a wearable camera designed to capture experiences in 360 degrees. – 8K TV, you have to see it to believe the detail. Appreneur Scholars supporting students I judged the CES Appreneur Scholar awards for the top mobile apps founded by The Kay Family Foundation and Living in Digital Times. The winners in the global search were iCPooch App and SmartTest Pro. Brooke Martin indicated “I am honored to be recognized for my contributions in developing iCPooch. To be acknowledged amongs such amazing and talented finalists is as rewarding as it is truly inspiring.” Zach Burmeister went on to say: “The Appreneur Scholar Award is a great honor to me because it is a great sign of potential for SmartTest Pro!” Elim Kay added, “Kay Family Foundation is honored to partner with Living in Digital Times for a second year and recognize two brilliant young entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs like Brooke and Zach are engines to driving innovation relevant to the Information Age. I hope the Appreneur Scholar awards helps Brooke and Zach to further their journeys with their respective ventures.”
  63. 63. January 16, 2015 International CES amazing transforming technologies I just returned from Las Vegas and the international CES with 170,000 delegates, 3600 exhibitors, 6000 press in over 2.2 million square feet—the largest technology showcase ever! Appreneur Scholars I judged the CES Appreneur Scholar awards founded by Elim Kay, funded by the Kay Family Foundation and produced by Robin Raskin owner of Living in Digital Times who account for more than 40 percent of the high-value content and events at CES. The winners were iCPooch and SmartTest Pro. The free iCPooch App is designed to let you connect to your pet and provides you with two-way video chat and the ability to deliver them a treat from anywhere in the world.SmartTest Pro Teacher and Student Edition introduces education to a new method of digital testing. From winner Brooke Martin: "I am honored to be recognized for my contributions in developing iCPooch. To be acknowledged amongst such amazing and talented finalists is as rewarding as it is truly inspiring." Zach Burmeister went on to say: "The Appreneur Scholar Award is a great honor to me because it is a great sign of potential for SmartTest Pro!" Elim added, “Kay Family Foundation is honored to partner with Living in Digital Times for a second year and recognize two brilliant young entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs like Brooke and Zach are engines to driving innovation relevant to the Information Age. I hope the Appreneur Scholar awards helps Brooke and Zach to further their journeys with their respective ventures.” Hot trends and technology Samsung President and CEO of Consumer Electronics Boo-Keun Yoon indicated “The Internet of Things is about people, not things,” and by 2020, all Samsung devices will be connected to the IoT. Dr. Dieter Zetsche, chairman of the Board, Daimler AG and head of Mercedes-Benz Cars, stated “Mercedes aims to develop truly superhuman autonomous driving ability” evidenced in the company’s new concept car F 015 which can drive itself, has seats that can swivel to face each other, possesses a computerized brain to watch pedestrian traffic, the interior featuring gesture and eye tracking control with free floating driving instruments. There are legal hurdles ahead such as liability in the case of an unavoidable accidents but self-driving cars will help us to achieve “the dream of freedom and mobility.” I captured added thoughts in this article for IT World -- According to Consumer Electronic Association (CEA) CEO Gary Shapiro, “Our forecast underscores that consumers’ love affair with technology shows no signs of slowing any time soon. Consumer technology is all about continued innovation. In the blink of an eye, consumer demand has taken off for emerging categories such as wearables, unmanned aerial vehicles and 4K Ultra HD – categories that were too small to track just three years ago. Expect to see these burgeoning categories, as well as innovations across the full spectrum of consumer technology, on display this week at the 2015 International CES.”
  64. 64. Other emerging products include 3D printers, connected thermostats, unmanned systems (such as unmanned vehicles and home robots), IP cameras and smart wearables. Technologies which caught my attention included: - Toshiba’s talking ChihiraAico robot - SCiO is the world’s first molecular sensor that fits in the palm of your hand! It is a no-touch optical sensor that provides a seamless user experience. With SCiO, you can begin exploring what physical objects are made of, for example, how much fat is in cheese or salad dressing, how much sugar is in a piece of fruit, checking the freshness or pureness of cooking oil, knowing when an avocado will ripen, understanding the well-being of plants, identifying what medicine one is about to consume and much more. The applications are endless. Each time you scan an item you help build the world’s first database of physical matter. That new database has tremendous implications on food, research, health care and our environment. The data that SCiO collects will be a great leap forward for human knowledge of the physical universe. - MeccaNoid is a new robotics building system from Meccano. At $399, MeccaNoid is the first of its kind: a four-foot tall humanoid that comes with built-in voice recognition, conversations, and much much more. Most importantly, users can create their own custom robot movements by physically moving the robot while in record mode. These movements and audio are stored in memory and can be recalled at any time with simple voice commands. - From the creators of the original Guitar Hero®* comes Singtrix®, the next-generation karaoke machine that makes bad singers sound good and good singers sound amazing! Sound like your favorite stars with hundreds of professional vocal effects, live backup harmonies created from your own voice & natural pitch-correction. It works with any music and any audio device. - 360fly, a wearable camera designed to capture experiences how they happened, as they happened, in 360º. Offering an unrivaled 360×240-degree field of view, 360fly redefines video capture and the way we share life’s unforgettable moments. - 8K TV, you have to see it to believe the detail Top CES trends from serial entrepreneurs who are showcased on the CES Wall of Apps for the most innovative apps of the year Elim Kay, Top Pioneering Innovator, Young Entrepreneur, International Board Director, Notable C-level Executive provided his thoughts on technologies at CES: 1. Wearable Devices: in my opinion, wearable devices present the next level tier of capturing categories of data on humans (e.g. state of the human bodies, external movements) which can be fused with currently captured data from mainstream sources (e.g. mobile devices). This aggregated data, coupled together with relevant learning engines, can provide richer depth and context which translates into increased precision in generating quantitative intelligence. The opportunities that result may produce huge upside to huge industries, not only healthcare but also retail, restaurants, hospitality, etc.
  65. 65. 2. Augmented Reality: While augmented reality is still in very early form, the future of augmented reality seems promising given the existing infrastructure of continuous advancement of humans’ digital behavior (and increasing precision of human-profiling by machines) that, in my opinion, is leading digital societies to eventually brace augmented realities in its eventual form(s). And I believe such forms will produce significant impact virtually across all industries. 3. Drones: The future of embraced utility of drones is wide as drones allow humans to extend their physical reaches at lower economical means. This concept of physical extension cuts across all industries. As drones begin to gain in maturity and eventually couple with advancing machines, a question is whether a balance can be achieved in which humans maintain being in control of extending physical reach while not becoming marginalized? David Cheng, Top–Ranking Pioneering Chairman, Software Developer, and World Innovation Technology Leader and Entrepreneur also shared Elim’s thoughts and along with a couple of additional points: 1. More consumer friendly wearable Devices in how its effects on the healthcare industry. The advancement in the last 12 months in the area is quite impressive. The healthcare industry have gotten pressure to move more toward keeping a population healthcare versus treating them only when they’re sick. The very specific movement toward making the devices more consumer friendly by making it more affordable and fashionable should help drive the adoption of these devices. And with strong adoption, it can actually play a major role is shifting the healthcare industry toward wellness management and more consumer driven. 2. 3D scanning and printing. I believe this literally opens up a new dimension. Not only does this allow us to be more creative in what we design and create but it will probably open up new markets and opportunities. Real Estate developers can now easily build 3D models of their designs and inventors can actually “print” their inventions versus seeing it only on the screen (with simulations). It will be exciting to see when these devices becomes more affordable along with new advancements. 3. Self-driving cars. I believe this CES really is driving home the idea that a fully autonomous vehicle is here today! Which means production vehicles is not too far behind. Now imagine if they network all of these cars and be able to figure out (automatically) how to get everyone from point A to point B with full collaboration from every car! The stuff we’ve seen in sci-fi movies is actually here. David and Elim’s most recent venture is as co-founders of Zaka a social-based relationship management and referral mobile application and platform where you discover places through the people you trust! Zaka was spotlighted on the CES Wall of Apps as one of the year’s most innovative apps.
  66. 66. January 16, 2015 5 ed-tech highlights from CES 2015 From robot teachers to “smart” backpacks, CES 2015 had plenty to excite educators The annual International Consumer Electronics Show, better known as CES, is the showcase for newer technologies already in the marketplace and those soon to debut. “What is popular in the consumer market is becoming more of the backbone of education, because that’s what students bring in,” said Kerry Goldstein, producer of TransformingEDU, the show’s education track. “There’s no place better than CES to look at what is going on with technology.” The top five trends at CES this year that educators should know about were: Sony’s Morpheus. Copyright: Barone Firenze / Shutterstock.com Augmented technology/virtual reality: The University of Chihuahua (Mexico) is using the technology in the arts and the sciences. Art students are virtually traveling to different renowned art museums to see different artists work in a much more immersive way than books or simple video will allow. Similarly, chemistry and biology students are using virtual reality to conduct experiments, study how the heart works, and more. Since schools rearely have access to these cutting-edge experiences, Goldstein explained, the virtual reality technology enables them to teach these subjects without these facilities.
  67. 67. Formlabs Form +1. More and better 3D printers: Only a couple of years ago, 3D printers were new on the market and CES displayed only a few models. In 2015 there were “rows upon rows,” according to John Ittleson, professor emeritus of information systems and communications design at California State University Monterey Bay. Now students can use these devices to print models of buildings rather than making models of them by hand. Budding artists can produce model sculptures in the same way. Ittleson cautioned that they 3D printers run the gamut from very cheap ones that break down easily to very expensive ones designed for heavy industry. HP is expected to be the dominant company in the 3D printer market due to its overall strength in printer technology, but there are several other viable players. Copyright: AMPL Labs. Wearable devices: Expanding from the health monitors by Fitbit, Nike, Jawbone and several others to the much talked about smart watches to wireless earbuds, “smart clothing” with embedded electronics, cameras and other wearables. Ittleson was particularly intrigued by wearable devices that supply much needed power to laptops and to wireless devices, like the AMPL SmartBackPack, which has swappable backup batteries that can charge anything from a smartphone to a laptop. The backpack, which is black with green accents, has a built-in 5,000mAh battery, which can charge an iPhone 6 two and a half times on a single charge and can handle tablets, too.

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