35. virginia woolf

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35. virginia woolf

  1. 1. Virginia WoolfVirginia Woolf.
  2. 2. Virginia Woolf 1. Life (1882-1941) Her father Leslie Stephen was an eminent Victorian man of letters. She grew up in a literary and intellectual atmosphere with free access to her father’s library Leslie Stephen with Virginia Woolf. Childhood experiences of death and sexual abuse led to depression the death of her mother her stepbrothers when she was 13 Only Connect ... New Directions
  3. 3. Virginia Woolf 1. Life (1882-1941) Suicide The Second World War increased her anxiety and fears. After rewriting drafts of her suicide note, she put rocks into her pockets and drowned herself in the River Ouse. Virginia Woolf. Only Connect ... New Directions
  4. 4. Virginia Woolf 2. Literary career The Bloomsbury Group  In 1904 she moved to Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group. This meant the rejection of traditional morality and artistic convention. Experimentation  best known as one The Bloomsbury Group of the great experimental novelists during the modernist period. Only Connect ... New Directions
  5. 5. Virginia Woolf 2. Literary career Evolution of her style in her main novels • The Voyage Out (1915) Traditional • Night and Day (1917) narratives • Jacob’s room (1922) Narrative experimentation with the novel • Mrs. Dalloway (1925) A more completely developed “stream-of-consciousness • To the Lighthouse (1927) technique” Only Connect ... New Directions
  6. 6. Virginia Woolf 2. Literary career A feminist writer  the themes of androgyny, women and writing Describes Clarissa Dalloway and • Mrs. Dalloway (1925) Sally Seton’s relationship as young women • Orlando (1928) Deals with androgyny Shows Woolf’s concern with the questions of women’s subjugation • A Room of One’s Own and the relationship between women (1929) and writing Only Connect ... New Directions
  7. 7. Virginia Woolf 3. A modernist novelist • Main aim  to give voice to the complex inner world of feeling and memory. • The human personality  a continuous shift of impressions and emotions. • Narrator  disappearance of the omniscient narrator. • Point of view  shifted inside the characters’ minds through flashbacks, associations of ideas, momentary Vanessa Bell, Mrs St John Hutchinson, 1915, impressions presented as a continuous flux. Tate Gallery, London Only Connect ... New Directions
  8. 8. Virginia Woolf 4. Woolf vs Joyce Woolf’s stream of Joyce’s stream of consciousness consciousness never lets her characters’ characters show their thoughts flow without control, thoughts directly through maintains logical and interior monologue, grammatical organisation sometimes in an incoherent and syntactically unorthodox way Only Connect ... New Directions
  9. 9. Virginia Woolf 4. Woolf vs Joyce Moments of being Epiphanies Rare moments of insight The sudden spiritual during the characters’ daily manifestation caused by a life when they can see trivial gesture, an external reality behind appearances object  the character is led to a self-realization about himself/herself Only Connect ... New Directions
  10. 10. Virginia Woolf 5. Mrs Dalloway (1925) • Takes place on a single ordinary day in June 1923. • Follows the protagonist through a very small area of London, from the morning to the night of the day on which she gives a large formal party. • Clarissa Dalloway’s party is the climax of the novel and unifies the Cover for the first edition of Mrs. narrative by gathering all the people Dalloway, London, Hogarth Press, 1925. she thinks about during the day. Only Connect ... New Directions
  11. 11. Virginia Woolf 5. Mrs Dalloway (1925) Clarissa Dalloway • A London society lady of fifty-one, the wife of a Conservative MP, Richard Dalloway, who has conventional views on women’s rights. • Had a possessive father, refused Vanessa Redgrave as Mrs. Dalloway in Marleen Gorris’s 1997 film adaptation Peter Walsh, a man who would force her to share everything. Only Connect ... New Directions
  12. 12. Virginia Woolf 5. Mrs Dalloway (1925) Clarissa Dalloway • Characterized by opposing feelings: her need for freedom and independence and her class consciousness. • Her life appears to be an effort towards order and peace, an attempt to overcome her weakness and sense of Vanessa Redgrave as Mrs. Dalloway in Marleen Gorris’s 1997 film adaptation failure. Only Connect ... New Directions
  13. 13. Virginia Woolf 5. Mrs Dalloway (1925) Septimus Warren Smith • A young poet and lover of Shakespeare. • When the war broke out, enlisted for patriotic reasons. Rupert Graves as Septimus in Marleen Gorris’s 1997 film • An extremely sensitive man who adaptation can suddenly fall prey to panic and fear, or feelings of guilt. Only Connect ... New Directions
  14. 14. Virginia Woolf 5. Mrs Dalloway (1925) Septimus Warren Smith • A character specifically connected with the war. • Suffers from headaches and insomnia. Rupert Graves as Septimus in Marleen Gorris’s 1997 film • Finally commits suicide. adaptation Only Connect ... New Directions
  15. 15. Virginia Woolf 6. To the Lighthouse (1927) No traditional plot  a series of experiences, memories, emotions and feelings held together by symbols. The story develops over a period of ten years. Divided into three sections: 1. The Window  It starts just before World War I. It is set during a summer afternoon and evening in a summer home on the Isle of Skye in the Hebrides The original St. Ives lighthouse, built by John Smeaton in 1830. Only Connect ... New Directions
  16. 16. Virginia Woolf 6. To the Lighthouse (1927) 2. Time Passes  covers about ten years. The children grow up, war breaks out, Mrs Ramsay dies suddenly one night. Her eldest son, Andrew, is killed in battle, and her daughter Prue dies too. The summerhouse falls into a The original St. Ives lighthouse, built by John Smeaton in 1830. state of decay for ten years until the family comes back. Only Connect ... New Directions
  17. 17. Virginia Woolf 6. To the Lighthouse (1927) 3. The Lighthouse  lasts less than one day. time experienced, and especially recaptured in memory, replaces outer time. Mr Ramsay, his son James and his daughter Cam sail to the lighthouse. Lily The original St. Ives lighthouse, built by John Smeaton in 1830. succeeds in finishing her painting. Only Connect ... New Directions
  18. 18. Virginia Woolf 7. To the Lighthouse: characters MRS RAMSAY • A beautiful woman and loving wife, constantly provides support to the other characters in the novel. • As a mother, her main objective is to preserve her son James’s sense of hope and wonder in relation to the lighthouse. Vanessa Bell, Virginia Woolf at Asheham, ca. 1910, National Portrait Gallery, London. Only Connect ... New Directions
  19. 19. Virginia Woolf 7. To the Lighthouse: characters MRS RAMSAY • She realizes that the beauty of this world is ephemeral and should be protected. • She has the ability to bring together different things into a whole. Vanessa Bell, Virginia Woolf at Asheham, ca. • After her death, Lily and the other 1910, National Portrait Gallery, London. characters try to reach this unity. Only Connect ... New Directions
  20. 20. Virginia Woolf 7. To the Lighthouse: characters LILY BRISCOE • A painter who fears her work will end up in attics or under a couch. • Rejects the conventional image of the woman represented by Mrs Ramsay. Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell painting, 1915, National Galleries of Scotland. Only Connect ... New Directions
  21. 21. Virginia Woolf 7. To the Lighthouse: characters LILY BRISCOE • Her portrait of Mrs. Ramsay embodies her doubts: at the beginning of the novel she cannot make sense of the shapes and colours that she tries to reproduce. Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell painting, • Undergoes a drastic change evolving into an artist who 1915, National Galleries of Scotland. achieves her final vision. Only Connect ... New Directions
  22. 22. Virginia Woolf 8. To the Lighthouse: themes a. Transience  the idea that nothing lasts runs through the novel  Mrs Ramsay does not want her children to become adults.  The house falls into decay.  Death unexpectedly ends life. St. Ives, Cornwall, the setting for The Lighthouse Only Connect ... New Directions
  23. 23. Virginia Woolf 8. To the Lighthouse: themes b. Loss  Minta loses her brooch on the beach.  The family loses some of its members. St. Ives, Cornwall, the setting for The Lighthouse Only Connect ... New Directions
  24. 24. Virginia Woolf 8. To the Lighthouse: themes c. Art  the ambition to stop the flux of time is embodied by the artist Lily Briscoe. d. The force of love  Mrs Ramsay believes that also love can create durable memories making moments permanent. St. Ives, Cornwall, the setting for The Lighthouse Only Connect ... New Directions
  25. 25. Virginia Woolf 9. To the Lighthouse: symbolism The sound of the sea  the fullness of life and the imminence of death, uncertainty. The land and the house  idea of shelter and stability. The window  the dividing and A scene from 2002’s The Hours, directed by Stephen Daldry. connecting point between the self and society. Only Connect ... New Directions
  26. 26. Virginia Woolf 9. To the Lighthouse: symbolism The lighthouse •a positive symbol linked to light, comfort, hope and enthusiasm, a reference point in a changing world. •the inaccessible destination leading to frustration and threatening danger. A scene from 2002’s The Hours, directed by Stephen Daldry. Only Connect ... New Directions
  27. 27. Virginia Woolf 10. A Room of One’s Own (1929) • Woolf had been invited to give a lecture on the topic of Women and Fiction. She advanced the thesis that “a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”. • Her essay is constructed as a partly-fictionalized narrative of the steps that led her to adopt this A contemporary edition of A Room thesis. of One’s Own. Only Connect ... New Directions
  28. 28. Virginia Woolf 10. A Room of One’s Own (1929) • She dramatizes that mental process in the character of an imaginary narrator (“call   me Mary Beton, Mary Seton, Mary Carmichael or by any name you please--it is not a matter of any importance”). • The narrator reflects on the different educational experiences available to men and women as well as on more material differences in their lives. • The figure of Judith Shakespeare is A contemporary edition of A Room of One’s Own. generated as an example of the tragic fate a highly intelligent woman would have met. Only Connect ... New Directions
  29. 29. Virginia Woolf 10. A Room of One’s Own (1929) • She considers the achievements of the major women novelists of the nineteenth century and reflects on the importance of tradition to an aspiring writer. • Woolf closes the essay with an exhortation to her audience of women to take up the tradition that has been so hardly bequeathed to them, and to increase the endowment for their own daughters. A contemporary edition of A Room of One’s Own. Only Connect ... New Directions
  30. 30. Virginia Woolf 10. A Room of One’s Own (1929) MAIN THEMES  Women’s position in fiction and in real life.  Critique of patriarchal society.  Struggle for women’s rights. Only Connect ... New Directions

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