Hinz telling your civil rights story

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  • To make the session more interactive and better help participants share how much they know, ask them directly what kind of details about audiences to include and have someone scribe on large poster sheets. List should contain:race and ethnicity, gender, age, income, poverty rates, employment profiles, school data, family profiles, in and out migration, differences by geographic area, population trends in all categories.
  • How have you defined potential audience for each program you discuss?Potential audience is those who would be interested in or benefit from your educational program. You define your potential audience based on the goals of your programShare example of WNEP???
  • Hinz telling your civil rights story

    1. 1. Telling Your Civil Rights Story<br />How to effectively communicate your civil rights activities<br />
    2. 2. Your civil rights story should be about how you reach audiences protected by the Title VI Civil Rights Law of 1964.<br />
    3. 3. Our responsibilities<br />As a recipient of federal funding, Cooperative Extension is required to comply with civil rights laws to:<br />1) assure nondiscrimination and equal opportunity<br />2) make up for historic and continuing discrimination toward protected groups by reaching out with special efforts (affirmative action).<br />
    4. 4. Review together as a team<br />Civil Rights Resources Website<br />http://www.uwex.edu/ces/admin/crights/<br />Expanding Access Through Civil Rights Activities<br />New Colleague Orientation--PowerPoint<br />
    5. 5. Who should tell the story?<br />All members of the county office team should participate and demonstrate their understanding and involvement in civil rights outreach<br />As a team, discuss roles of each colleague<br />
    6. 6. Demographic data is foundational to your story<br />Include as much detail as possible <br />Describe your county profile<br />Be more specific about demographics relevant to program areas<br />Census, Applied Population Lab, local sources <br />
    7. 7. General and specific<br />One person cover general county demographics relevant to overall Extension programming<br />Individual colleagues cover demographics relevant to program areas<br />
    8. 8. ***Demographics help identify potential audience<br />How did you decide to focus special efforts on particular groups of people?<br />How have you defined potential audience for each program you discuss?<br />Potential audience is those who would be interested in or benefit from your educational program. You define your potential audience based on the goals of your program<br />
    9. 9. Connect demographics to program<br />Focus on county data for people in groups protected by the Title VI Civil Rights Law of 1964 (racial and ethnic groups, women)<br />Small (>2 %) percentage of people in protected groups? What is diversity for your programs? Discuss those groups.<br />Neglected audiences for the full county team to target?<br />Neglected audiences for each program area?<br />
    10. 10. Questions about telling you demographics story?<br />
    11. 11. Demographics help identify potential audience<br />
    12. 12. ***Demonstrate understanding of civil rights outreach activities—include in your story<br />What are your all reasonable efforts?<br />What are the roles of individual colleagues?<br />What partnerships help reach specific audiences?<br />How have you incorporated the activities of civil rights outreach into program planning and implementation?<br />
    13. 13. Outreach activities<br />Include protected groups and neglected audiences in program planning activities and seek their input. Ensure that they are represented on mailing lists.<br />Partner with local groups, agencies and organizations to reach protected groups and other neglected audiences<br />
    14. 14. Outreach activities<br />Keep mailing lists and e-mail lists up to date with people of color and organizations that represent or serve people of color—discuss<br />Make personal contacts within communities of color to learn about and to reach out to these people--discuss<br />Conduct meetings and educational sessions in facilities in welcoming and accessible locations and provide accommodations for people with disabilities--discuss<br />
    15. 15. Outreach activities<br />Keep flyers, press releases, invitation letters and other outreach correspondence, program brochures sent to targeted individuals and organizations with notations or where and when--discuss.<br />Keep notes from meetings and phone conversations that demonstrate your outreach to people of color--discuss<br />
    16. 16. Use the language of civil rights<br />Underrepresented audiences<br />Neglected audiences<br />All reasonable efforts<br />Protected groups<br />Name the audiences you target –Latinos, African Americans, Hmong, low income, people living in poverty, youth with hearing disabilities, etc.<br />
    17. 17. ***Demonstrate that you have problem-solved together as a team<br />Name some of the barriers to reaching neglected audience<br />What have you done to overcome the barriers<br />
    18. 18. ***Have you been successful? <br />Does your data show that you have been successful over time? What do your charts show about potential audience compared to actual participants?<br />Compare current data from charts with data from previous years<br />Refer to progress since the last review<br />
    19. 19. ***Start considering your action plans<br />As you plan for your civil rights day, consider what will be on our action plans—one for your county office team and one for each program area<br />
    20. 20. Questions and brainstorming<br />Pose questions and ideas for discussion throughout the day<br />
    21. 21. Your story should be about access rather than about content<br />Your civil rights story should be about how you reach audiences protected by the Title VI Civil Rights Law of 1964.<br />

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