Neo Classicism

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  • I apologize for the rapid ending to the lecture, and that I don't really get to the sculpture and architecture. Too much time in the beginning... :P So, expect the end to be a bit of a mess, and the pictures will fly by without much being said about them.
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  • SLIDE 1: The Apotheosis of Homer Begin by asking students to make observations about the painting. What do they notice? They should come up with comments that look similar to slide two.
  • SLIDE 2: List of traits that describe the painting and art period This did not come out the blue. There are reasons that this became the ideal form and subject of art. – Form of art is called Neoclassicism . Related to and comes out of the Enlightenment, but it is not the same thing.
  • SLIDE 3: relationship between Neoclassicism and the Enlightenment. Origins of the Modern World: It is with the Enlightenment that we get the foundation of “The Modern World.”
  • SLIDE 4: Differentiates the pre-modern world from the modern one? Highlight one ruler to illustrate the difference: Louis XIV: The Sun King Power: Aristocratic and Church – Privileged few held power – justified by divine right. Everyone else existed to serve and adore the rulers and to fit in a fixed system. Wealth: Agricultural and limited to the few. Land ownership meant wealth and it was concentrated within the aristocracy. Holdover from the feudal system.
  • SLIDES 4-7: Aesthetics: Vast amounts of wealth spent by aristocracy to support their social status and entertainment. A dominant image of this was the Palace of Versailles, which took immense amounts of wealth to build and maintain – all of which is an expression of the political and economic system of the day.
  • SLIDES 4-7: Aesthetics: Vast amounts of wealth spent by aristocracy to support their social status and entertainment. A dominant image of this was the Palace of Versailles, which took immense amounts of wealth to build and maintain – all of which is an expression of the political and economic system of the day.
  • SLIDES 4-7: Aesthetics: Vast amounts of wealth spent by aristocracy to support their social status and entertainment. A dominant image of this was the Palace of Versailles, which took immense amounts of wealth to build and maintain – all of which is an expression of the political and economic system of the day.
  • SLIDES 8-12: The artistic manifestation of this come to be represented by two movements: and Baroque: passion detailed creative dynamic change Rococo : excess trivial whimsical curls exaggeration
  • SLIDES 8-12: The artistic manifestation of this come to be represented by two movements: and Baroque: passion detailed creative dynamic change Rococo : excess trivial whimsical curls exaggeration
  • SLIDES 8-12: The artistic manifestation of this come to be represented by two movements: and Baroque: passion detailed creative dynamic change Rococo : excess trivial whimsical curls exaggeration
  • SLIDES 8-12: The artistic manifestation of this come to be represented by two movements: and Baroque: passion detailed creative dynamic change Rococo : excess trivial whimsical curls exaggeration
  • Begins with two revolutions: Industrial Steam power vs manual labor – powered by coal Machine manufacturing vs hand crafting Development of iron making techniques Agricultural innovations and techniques – more production and less labor Medicine increased survival and population grew – surplus labor Rail, roads and transport developed national and international commerce Changes: economy moves from agriculture which becomes cheap to manufacturing and mercantilism wealth is no longer seen in regards of land but of money/gold/material goods rise of a non-aristocratic middle and upper class that gain power because of money. Wealth of aristocracy (land based) begins to decline. Allows for leisure time so middle class can participate in social engagements and education Political based on theories of Locke and Rousseau 1776 American Revolution 1789 French Revolution Changes: established a government system based on Enlightenment ideals – Democracy. Represented in the three colors of American and French flag Blue – Liberty / vigilance, perseverance and justice White – equality / purity and innocence Red – fraternity / hardiness and valour
  • SLIDES 13-14: Oath & Socrates: Emphasize the characteristics of NC art: art is historical but serves a contemporary pragmatic purpose of addressing social reality and community that holds it together shows a regard for tradition and classics – renewed by recent discoveries of classic al ruins – Pompeii and Herculanium – mimic the stories and arts ideal is presented not the real world – it is artificial and thus structure , rules and conventions – real world is flawed and limited as are people - Use symbolism and allegory to suggest the ideal nature of things belief in "nature" implies a conviction that there is a permanent, universal way things are (and should be), which obviously entails fundamental political and ethical commitments lack of virtuosity – flattened space rather that show off what you can do with perspective. Human perspective is not necessarily privileged. Emphasize design over detail Artists role was to capture nature’s “timeless forms” from the everyday and then, through exposing truth, to educate and enlighten the viewer.
  • SLIDES 13-14: Oath & Socrates: Emphasize the characteristics of NC art: art is historical but serves a contemporary pragmatic purpose of addressing social reality and community that holds it together shows a regard for tradition and classics – renewed by recent discoveries of classic al ruins – Pompeii and Herculanium – mimic the stories and arts ideal is presented not the real world – it is artificial and thus structure , rules and conventions – real world is flawed and limited as are people - Use symbolism and allegory to suggest the ideal nature of things belief in "nature" implies a conviction that there is a permanent, universal way things are (and should be), which obviously entails fundamental political and ethical commitments lack of virtuosity – flattened space rather that show off what you can do with perspective. Human perspective is not necessarily privileged. Emphasize design over detail Artists role was to capture nature’s “timeless forms” from the everyday and then, through exposing truth, to educate and enlighten the viewer.
  • SLIDE 15: Death of Marat : We move even more directly into representing a current event, but it is still mythologized and idealized. Still classical clothing. Marat as Christ/martyr.
  • SLIDE 16: General Wolfe: current event but also idealized as pieta – Christ. Not in classic dress, but still epic and ideal
  • SLIDE 17-18: Madame Recamier, Canova Even portraiture is done with an intentional reference to the classics – Madame Recamier, a wealthy supporter of artists, philosophers and thinkers, is portrayed as a classical woman in what resembles robes. She is likened to Venus. See again in sculpture of Canova
  • SLIDE 17-18: Madame Recamier, Canova Even portraiture is done with an intentional reference to the classics – Madame Recamier, a wealthy supporter of artists, philosophers and thinkers, is portrayed as a classical woman in what resembles robes. She is likened to Venus. See again in sculpture of Canova
  • Sculpture & Architecture: All of this is governed by 3 ideas: 1. Contemporary culture is enriched by constant inquiry into the past 2. An eclectic aesthetic that allowed the artist to select and combine different styles 3. A modernist concept that the present is a unique period and demands expression in its own terms. So, it is not just a matter of copying what came before.
  • Sculpture & Architecture: All of this is governed by 3 ideas: 1. Contemporary culture is enriched by constant inquiry into the past 2. An eclectic aesthetic that allowed the artist to select and combine different styles 3. A modernist concept that the present is a unique period and demands expression in its own terms. So, it is not just a matter of copying what came before.
  • Sculpture & Architecture: All of this is governed by 3 ideas: 1. Contemporary culture is enriched by constant inquiry into the past 2. An eclectic aesthetic that allowed the artist to select and combine different styles 3. A modernist concept that the present is a unique period and demands expression in its own terms. So, it is not just a matter of copying what came before.
  • Both modeled after ancient styles and even mirror the stories and themes. Ushers in a revival of classical style in architecture, which dominates US government buildings. Thomas Jefferson felt that the architecture of antiquity embodied natural principles that should be the foundation of a philosophy of architecture. Architecture – rational, simple but grandiose, balanced, symmetrical.
  • Both modeled after ancient styles and even mirror the stories and themes. Ushers in a revival of classical style in architecture, which dominates US government buildings. Thomas Jefferson felt that the architecture of antiquity embodied natural principles that should be the foundation of a philosophy of architecture. Architecture – rational, simple but grandiose, balanced, symmetrical.
  • Both modeled after ancient styles and even mirror the stories and themes. Ushers in a revival of classical style in architecture, which dominates US government buildings. Thomas Jefferson felt that the architecture of antiquity embodied natural principles that should be the foundation of a philosophy of architecture. Architecture – rational, simple but grandiose, balanced, symmetrical.
  • Both modeled after ancient styles and even mirror the stories and themes. Ushers in a revival of classical style in architecture, which dominates US government buildings. Thomas Jefferson felt that the architecture of antiquity embodied natural principles that should be the foundation of a philosophy of architecture. Architecture – rational, simple but grandiose, balanced, symmetrical.
  • Both modeled after ancient styles and even mirror the stories and themes. Ushers in a revival of classical style in architecture, which dominates US government buildings. Thomas Jefferson felt that the architecture of antiquity embodied natural principles that should be the foundation of a philosophy of architecture. Architecture – rational, simple but grandiose, balanced, symmetrical.
  • Neo Classicism

    1. 1. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres – The Apotheosis of Homer - 1827
    2. 2. SUBJECT Heroic Virtue Idealistic Historical Stoic Epic Rational Symbolic STYLE Simplicity Symmetrical Clean Lines Muted Colors Shallow Depth of Field Balance
    3. 3. ENLIGHTENMENT: Philosophical and political system of thought whose purpose is the economic and political transformation of society. NEOCLASSICISM: An artistic manifestation of aesthetic and cultural ideals.
    4. 4. Hyacinthe Rigaud Louis XIV 1701
    5. 5. Palace of Versailles
    6. 6. The Bed of King Louis XIV Versailles
    7. 7. Peasant Village at Versailles
    8. 8. Gianlorenzo Bernini Ecstasy of St. Teresa 1644
    9. 9. Baroque Church in Vienna Austria
    10. 10. Jean Honoré Fragonard The Happy Accident of the Swing 1767
    11. 11. Balthasar Neumann - Kaisersaal Residence - Wurzburg - 1719-44
    12. 12. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres – The Apotheosis of Homer - 1827
    13. 13. Jacques-Louis David - Oath of the Horatii - 1784
    14. 14. Jacques-Louis David – The Death of Socrates - 1787
    15. 15. Jacques-Louis David Marat Assassinated 1793
    16. 16. Benjamin West – The Death of General Wolfe - 1770
    17. 17. Jacques-Louis David - Madame Recamier 1800
    18. 18. Antonio Canova - Maria Paulina Borghese as Venus Victrix - 1808
    19. 19. Antonio Canova Perseus with the Head of Medusa 1804-6
    20. 20. Apollo Belvedere 4th century BC
    21. 21. Jean-Antoine Houdon George Washington 1785-88
    22. 22. Pantheon - Rome
    23. 23. Pantheon Rome - Dome
    24. 24. Jacques Germain Soufflot - Pantheon - Paris - 1755-92
    25. 25. Thomas Jefferson - Monticello 1770-84
    26. 26. Thomas Jefferson - Rotunda – 1823-26
    27. 29. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres - The Grand Odalisque - 1814
    28. 30. Jacques-Louis David - The Tennis Court Oath -1791
    29. 31. Jacques-Louis David - Cupid and Psyche - 1824
    30. 32. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Pauline Eleanore de Galard de Brassac de Bearn, Princesse de Broglie 1853
    31. 33. Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Jupiter and Thetis 1811

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