Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Teen Insights Into Drugs, Alcohol & Nicotine

435 views

Published on

Highlights from Center on Addiction's National Survey of Adolescent Attitudes Toward Addictive Substances

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Teen Insights Into Drugs, Alcohol & Nicotine

  1. 1. Highlights from Center on Addiction’s National Survey of Adolescent Attitudes Toward Addictive Substances Teen Insights Into Drugs, Alcohol & Nicotine 1
  2. 2. Why Focus On Parents/Caregivers? Parenting a teenager is rewarding but very challenging • Balancing trust, responsibility, independence with need to protect health and safety • Especially difficult in relation to substance use • Most effective is to offer love, warmth, trust and support and foster independence while remaining actively involved 2
  3. 3. Methodology Latest in our 25+ year history of surveying teens • Nationally representative web-based survey of 1,014 teens • Conducted in early 2018 • 50.8% of the sample was female • 48.7% aged 12-14, 51.3% aged 15-17 The survey explored teens’: • Exposure and access to a range of addictive substances • Sources of information, attitudes about these substances • Substance use among friends and peers • Intentions to try in the future • Relationship with their parents/guardians 3
  4. 4. Teens Face Widespread Exposure To & Misinformation About Substances • 46% have at least a few close friends who use • 52% find it easy to access nicotine, alcohol, other drugs • 49% personally know someone with addiction • 33% get their information from unreliable sources like other teens, the internet, or social media • 28% have witnessed illegal drug use in real life, primarily at school 4
  5. 5. PERCENTAGE OF TEENS WITH AT LEAST A FEW CLOSE FRIENDS WHO ENGAGE IN SUBSTANCE USE 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. Risk Highest For Teens With Friends Who Use More than 2X as many teens with friends who use drugs as those without friends who use drugs: • Intend to try addictive substances in the future • Have witnessed illegal drug use in real life • Personally know someone with addiction • Rely on unreliable sources of information about drugs • Perceive substance use as not particularly risky/concerning • Hang out with friends unsupervised • Have social media accounts not monitored by parents • Do not have a very positive relationship with their parents • Do not eat dinner with their parents regularly 7
  8. 8. Ease Of Access More Likely Among Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs • More teens who have a friend who uses drugs indicated that they would be able to obtain each type of substance within a day or less relative to teens who do not have friends who use drugs 8
  9. 9. Knowing Someone With Addiction More Likely Among Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs 9 67 52 54 18 13 9 32 19 14 3 1 2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Nicotine Alcohol Marijuana Rx Opioids Other Rx Cocaine/Meth Friend who Uses No Friend who Uses
  10. 10. Turning To Unreliable Sources Of Information About Drugs More Likely Among Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs 10
  11. 11. Witnessing Illegal Drug Use In Real Life More Likely Among Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs 11
  12. 12. Intentions To Try Substances More than half (55%) of teens said they might or are likely to try substances in the future • More older than younger teens said so (61% vs 48%) • More teens with friends who use drugs said so 12
  13. 13. Ease Of Access More Likely Among Teens With Intentions To Try 43 36 52 30 13 16 11 16 9 6 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cigarettes Vaping Alcohol Marijuana Rx Opioids Intend to Try Do Not Intend to Try 13
  14. 14. Risk Increases Substantially From Early To Later Adolescence Significantly more 15-17 than 12-14-year-olds: • Have friends who use drugs • Intend to try addictive substances in the future • Have witnessed illegal drug use in real life • Personally know someone with addiction • Rely on unreliable sources of information about drugs • Hang out with friends unsupervised • Have social media accounts not monitored by parents • Do not have a very positive relationship with their parents • Do not eat dinner with their parents regularly 14
  15. 15. More Older Teens Are At Risk For Vaping And Marijuana Use 39 34 20 40 30 28 16 15 12 16 12 15 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Close Friends who Vape Easy Access to Vapes Intend to Try Vaping Close Friends who Use Marijuana Easy Access to Marijuana Intend to Try Marijuana Age 15-17 Age 12-14 15
  16. 16. More Older Teens Report Personally Knowing Someone with Addiction 16 44 30 31 10 36 24 15 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Nicotine Alcohol Marijuana Rx Opioids Age 15-17 Age 12-14
  17. 17. More Older Teens Say They Rely on Unreliable Sources of Information 15 13 12 11 8 6 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Other Teens Social Media Internet Age 15-17 Age 12-14 17
  18. 18. More Older Teens Say They Could Access Illegal Drugs Within A Day 8 10 9 3 2 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Heroin Cocaine Meth Age 15-17 Age 12-14 18
  19. 19. More Older Teens Would Feel Safe To Ride In A Car With Someone Who Just Used Marijuana 3.5 11.2 14.2 3.4 6.8 15.6 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Alcohol Marijuana Rx Opioids Age 15-17 Age 12-14 19
  20. 20. Fewer Older Teens Would Be Worried About A Friend Using Substances 31 27 30 35 44 40 45 50 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cigarettes Vaping Alcohol Marijuana Age 15-17 Age 12-14 20
  21. 21. Low Parental Monitoring Compounds the Risk More Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs Report Hanging Out With Friends Unsupervised More Teens With Intentions To Try Substances Report Hanging Out With Friends Unsupervised 21
  22. 22. Low Parental Monitoring Compounds the Risk More Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs Report Unmonitored Social Media Accounts More Teens With Intentions To Try Substances Report Unmonitored Social Media Accounts 22
  23. 23. Teens Who Aren’t Truthful With Parents Are At Increased Risk More Teens With Friends Who Use Drugs Report Lying To Parents More Teens With Intentions To Try Substances Report Lying To Parents 23
  24. 24. Not Enough Parents Talk About The Risks Of Drug Use 87 83 76 62 60 59 59 52 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Alcohol Nicotine Marijuana Cocaine Heroin Rx Opioids Meth Other Rx ] 24
  25. 25. Teens Generally Feel a Very Strong Bond With Their Parents The majority of teens (56%) described their relationship with their parents as ‘excellent’ • Less true of older than younger teens (51% vs 60%) • Less true of teens with vs without friends who use drugs (46% vs 59%) • Less true of teens who intend vs don’t intend to try substances in the future (49% vs 63%) 25
  26. 26. Parents Play Critical Role For Teens Choosing Not To Use More than half of teens said they believe the most common reason people their age choose not to drink or use drugs is parents, either because they think their parents would disapprove or because they don’t want to get in trouble with their parents. 26
  27. 27. Eating Meals Together As A Family Is Protective 27
  28. 28. Parents Continue To Be Main Source Of Protection For Teens • 56% believe the most common reason some teens choose not to drink or use drugs is parents • A close parent-teen relationship and strong parental monitoring significantly reduced risk of exposure to and misinformation about substances • Lower risk of exposure to and misinformation about substances reduced odds of having friends who use or having intentions to use in the future 28
  29. 29. Parents Can Be Protective Even When Other Risks Are High • Regardless of the number of risk factors a teen reported, high levels of monitoring reduced the odds that teens would report that they have friends who use drugs. • Regardless of the number of risk factors a teen reported, those with a good parent-child relationship and more parental monitoring had lower odds of reporting intentions to use in the future. 29
  30. 30. 30
  31. 31. What Can Parents And Other Caregivers Do? • Initiate prevention efforts at a young age • Don’t pull back as teens get older • Eat meals together as frequently as possible • Remove distractions during meals and other family activities • Take an interest in their interests • Know their friends and whereabouts • Be well informed • Have frequent, honest conversations about substance use, but also about their interests, friends, hopes, concerns • Set clear and fair rules and stick to them • Seek help early for signs of risk from a trusted professional 31
  32. 32. To Access The Full Report And A Brief Parent Companion: https://www.centeronaddiction.org/addiction- research/reports/teen-insights-drugs-alcohol-and- nicotine-national-survey-adolescent 32
  33. 33. Thank you! For more information, please contact Linda Richter, PhD Director of Policy Research and Analysis Center on Addiction lrichter@centeronaddiction.org 33

×