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SIGNA11Y - Speaker Presentations

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On May 15th, the day before Global Accessibility Awareness Day, we hosted SIGNA11Y - our very first accessibility and inclusive design event - at the CodeClan premises in Edinburgh.

Here are the presentations from our expert group of speakers -including our very own Software Engineer Claire Smith, Allan Hutcheon (COO of Neatebox), Iris Winter (Frontend Developer at Modulr Finance) and Chris Wait (Director of Engineering at Passio).

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SIGNA11Y - Speaker Presentations

  1. 1. WELCOME
  2. 2. Building accessible products takes practice Chris Wait - Director of Engineering @ Passio chris@passio.co.uk - @chriswaitwhat
  3. 3. Passio are a digital agency. We build technology to help people with disabilities.
  4. 4. Hard Problems
  5. 5. Hard Problems (1) "Building software that works for everyone is hard." Design is hard. People have vastly different needs from technology ● Functionality ● Presentation / Interaction
  6. 6. "Building software that works for everyone is hard." In 2015, roughly 1 in 3 software projects were completed ● On Budget ● On Time ● On Target Software Engineering Practice can help: "agile" projects were about 2 times more likely to succeed than "waterfall" projects [Standish Chaos] Hard Problems (2)
  7. 7. Our Practice (in theory)
  8. 8. How our Practice looks (1) Some key concepts: 1. A Backlog of tasks 2. Prioritised by the Product Owner, estimated by the team 3. Completed in Iterations
  9. 9. How our Practice looks (2) Iterations: Each sprint (a week or two) we go through the following steps: ● Work on items from the backlog until they're done ● Completed items are tested by the Product Owner and released ● New items are added to the backlog as they're discovered ● Review priorities and re-order the remaining backlog items A major win: We can adapt to changing requirements and priorities
  10. 10. Discovering Accessibility Issues
  11. 11. 1 Engaged Users
  12. 12. The Good: ● Your users know more than you about what they need ● Expert accessibility consulting The Bad: ● A Bad Experience ● A lot of Bad Experiences? (Your users can disagree with each other) Your users tell you when you mess up (sometimes)
  13. 13. Place a high value on your users' time In my experience, they will love you for it ● They might keep teaching you ● They'll probably tell their friends Be Responsive
  14. 14. Treat this feedback like any regular issue or feature request: ● Add them to the backlog ● Have a robust discussion about priorities ● Get them done ● Close the loop - get feedback from whoever raised the issue In Practice
  15. 15. 2 Design & Audits
  16. 16. In Practice "Accessibility First" - Carie Fisher ● Component-driven design ● Design for the ~25% of users with "Severe Difficulties", trickle down Good entry-points for accessibility thinking: ● When designing your product's value proposition ● When designing a new feature ● When testing a feature or regression testing
  17. 17. Participatory Design ● Involve the stakeholders (especially users) in the design process ● Iterate with their support ● This is a whole other talk… Auditing / User Testing In Practice (2)
  18. 18. Build learning into your team's practice - spike, document, share ● Learn about design principles, UI & UX design ● Learn about disabilities, how they affect people's technology use ● Learn about accessibility guidelines (WCAG, HIG) ● Learn about the accessibility tooling available on your platform (VoiceOver, TalkBack) ● Learn about accessibility auditing - manual and automated Consider team specialisation, knowledge-sharing... Learning
  19. 19. The Good: ● It's good to fix things before they break, before they go live ● When you're not firefighting, you can plan for larger, systemic fixes ● Broaden your UX thinking The Bad: ● You don't know what you don't know ● Accessibility consultants are expensive ● Sometimes users can have a louder voice than designers Good and Bad
  20. 20. One More Hard Problem...
  21. 21. "Client management is hard" Your clients are under pressure to continuously complete features and add value. Can you convince them to value accessibility? (After all, we can't all work for Neatebox) Hard Problems (3)
  22. 22. 1. Value for money (clients generally love this) ● Cheaper to fix problems sooner rather than later 2. Reach a broader audience ● Approximately 11 million people in the UK have a disability 3. Corporate Social Responsibility ● Have a positive impact on the technology environment Strategies
  23. 23. 4. Legal Responsibilities ● Public Sector: EU Directive on the Accessibility of Public Sector Websites and Mobile Applications ● Disability Discrimination Act - (RNIB & BMIBaby) ● Karl Groves "List of Web Accessibility-Related Litigation and Settlements" More Strategies
  24. 24. Some resources
  25. 25. Standish Chaos - https://www.standishgroup.com/sample_research_files/CHAOSReport2015-Final.pdf WCAG 2.1 - https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/ HIG Accessibility - https://developer.apple.com/design/human-interface-guidelines/accessibility Accessibility First (Carie Fisher) - https://www.24a11y.com/2017/accessibility-first/ RNIB - Tech Resource Hub - https://www.rnib.org.uk/practical-help/technology/resource-hub Cool stuff to read
  26. 26. Thanks for coming. You're all fantastic.
  27. 27. Approaching accessibility testing Iris Winter Frontend Developer at Modulr I am a frontend developer with a passion for accessibility. Currently working in fintech but coming from an agency background where I focused on raising awareness, educating clients and developers to help small to large businesses reach an inclusive audience
  28. 28. Automated / Scripted testing tools https://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/ - Collection of tools that test websites for WCAG standards
  29. 29. Codesniffer https://squizlabs.github.io/HTML_CodeSniffer/
  30. 30. What do these tests cover? http://squizlabs.github.io/HTML_CodeSniffer/Standards/WCAG2/
  31. 31. How do the results align with UAT?
  32. 32. A client’s experience
  33. 33. Focusing on user testing - Defining the target audience - Defining clear user journeys - Including a diverse user group in the testing process - Testing early and with prototypes
  34. 34. Simulate user testing for accessibility - Completing user journeys using a screen-reader (Jaws & NV Access) - Completing user journeys using keyboard input only - Simulating colour vision deficiency Chrome Plugin - Disabling CSS - Changing the browser font-size - Zooming - Completing user journeys with an understanding and awareness for accessibility needs
  35. 35. User testing a website with a screen reader
  36. 36. What is the user journey? What kind of website or tool is being tested?
  37. 37. Running the tests
  38. 38. Thanks
  39. 39. BREAK TIME
  40. 40. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  41. 41. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  42. 42. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  43. 43. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  44. 44. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  45. 45. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  46. 46. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  47. 47. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  48. 48. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  49. 49. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  50. 50. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  51. 51. © 2019 Neatebox SIGNA11Y - Discussing Accessibility
  52. 52. Web accessibility is the inclusive practice of ensuring there are no barriers that prevent interaction with, or access to, websites on the World Wide Web by people with disabilities. “
  53. 53. Starting the conversation
  54. 54. Raising awareness ● Presentations
  55. 55. Raising awareness ● Presentations
  56. 56. Raising awareness ● Presentations ● Workshops
  57. 57. Raising awareness ● Presentations ● Workshops ● Global Accessibility Awareness Day
  58. 58. Disable Javascript Improve accessibility on the project you are working on Use only a keyboard for an hour to navigate the web Use the Funkify Simulator Use VoiceOver for an hour Share something new you have learned on accessibility channel Scroll through twitter using VoiceOver Accessibility Quiz Disable image Raising awareness
  59. 59. Creating a team ● Idea session ● Set up slack channel ● Organise resources
  60. 60. Q&A

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