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Demystifying Research

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This interactive workshop is about your creative process and how it relates to the research process. It's a conversation about methods, ethics, information literacy and how that relates to the work you do. Get tips to organize and develop research questions, evaluate and access supporting materials and practice with your own questions.

This interactive workshop is about your creative process and how it relates to the research process. It's a conversation about methods, ethics, information literacy and how that relates to the work you do. Get tips to organize and develop research questions, evaluate and access supporting materials and practice with your own questions.

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Demystifying Research

  1. 1. Demystifying Research with Devora Neumark - Faculty Helen Linda - Librarian
  2. 2. What’s This Workshop About? 1. Your Creative Process 1. Your Research Process 1. Ethics of Research
  3. 3. Your Creative Process Process is personal and rarely linear. Let’s talk about how you create. Some possible ways to organize process: ● Mind maps & concept maps ● Lists & outlines ● Inspiration boards & Post-It walls ● Others?
  4. 4. Sample Concept/Mind Map Source: Holmes, Gillian. “Mindmapping.” Jazzjoll’s Blog. http://jazzjoll.wordpress.com/2010/03/29/mindmapping/.
  5. 5. Sample List/Outline Source: Gibaldi, J., Achtert, W. S., & Modern Language Association of American. (1994). MLA handbook for writers of research papers. New York: Modern Language Association of America
  6. 6. Sample Inspiration Board Source: McMullen, Sharon. “Inspiration Board / 2 - Ink + Mortar Design Co.” Ink + Mortar Design Co. http://inkandmortar.com/2014/03/21/inspiration-board-2/.
  7. 7. Sample Post-It Wall Source: Jen. “Back To School: Get Organized with an Easy School Planning Wall! -.” Tatertots and Jello. http://tatertotsandjello.com/2013/08/back-to-school-easy-post-it-note-school-planning-wall.html.
  8. 8. Your Research Process Process is personal and rarely linear. Let’s talk about how you search. ● What’s your role in research? ● How do you start? ● How do you validate information? Do you see similarities between your Creative and Research Processes?
  9. 9. Information Literacy & You The critical process of finding, evaluating, interpreting, managing, and using information to create new knowledge. ● Scholarship and creative practice is a conversation ● Re/search and creation as inquiry and exploration ● Authority of sources, constructs and context ● Ethics of information creation and use Shifting focus from consumption to creation in the community of knowledge. Informed by: Task Force on Information Literacy Standards. “Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education - Revised Draft.” Association of College & Research Libraries, June 17, 2014.
  10. 10. Research Ethics Ethics are rooted in a myriad of historical, cultural and knowledge traditions contexts ● The legislative framework and the crime of plagiarism ● Copyright, copyleft and artistic license ● Appropriation and authority This is only the beginning of this conversation!
  11. 11. Research Tour & Tips Here are some tried and true methods to fold into your process. ● How to find the words ● Organizing the research process ● Search tips ● Evaluation tips ● Using the information once you have it Skillshare: show and tell, what are your tricks?
  12. 12. Research Inquiry Exercise Keeping your own creative and research processes in mind: ● Name a research inquiry ● Name three key concepts or key words ● Gather supporting information Let’s do the work and talk about how to make that work easier, faster, and more fun.

Editor's Notes

  • Show creative process example slides. Give everyone 5 minutes to write or draw out their own creative process. For this we will need to have on hand: paper and an assortment of writing/drawing tools (in case they don’t come with their supplies).

    Discuss the processes, discoveries, surprises, methods, etc.
  • Have a round table in which everyone is invited to outline how they research and how they validate what they find. Participants may also want to respond to the question about the similarities (or differences) between their creative process and research process.
  • Scholarship is sustained discourse within a community. New insights occur with competing and complementary perspectives and interpretations.

    Research is iterative, relying on increasingly complex questions with answers developing new questions and lines of inquiry.

    Authority depends on resource origins, your need, and context of use with both informed skepticism and openness to new and changing perspectives and voices.

    Ethics is a moving target and is its own complex, ever changing conversation. More on this later.


  • Plagiarism is a legal issue with consequences - you can be sued for not crediting work, even by accident and may be faced with sanctions within the College.

    Derivative work/appropriation is NOT plagiarism if credited, but it may be against copyright, a different crime with separate but similar consequences.

    Copyright is a hotly contested topic. Where is the line between artistic license and crime? When might you choose to push or cross that boundary?

  • How to find the words.

    Match your/your community of inquiry’s words with the language created by librarians/information professionals who are not a part of your community of inquiry. Use materials you know with library search tools to find the translation of the inquiry language into library subject headings or database subjects/keywords/etc.

    Be a detective - what lead you here, who have you talked to, what have you read, etc. 5 W’s of journalism to take stock of your known knowledge, then mine that knowledge for resources.

    Organizing the search process to keep from falling down the rabbit hole

    Using the research inquiry and research process to keep focus. Using organized search and tools to be efficient.

    Searching tips

    Broad to narrow or visa versa - finding the sweet spot of how much information/results are manageable and relevant to you.
    Library resources bias vs. Google confirmation bias ; Scholarly vs. popular definitions

    Evaluation tips

    You should be able to determine what is the purpose and who wrote it
    How does it relate to your research question
    .com vs .org, .net, .gov, etc. in selecting appropriate web resources
    Advisors are the final arbitrator of appropriateness
    recognising bias - yours and others.
    recognizing context - cultural, physical, other


    Using information once you’ve got it

    Keep track of resources used
    Keep track of quotes
    Organize references and works cited: Using tools like Zotero to organize the fruits of labor and set aside non-relevant information for later.
    Create your Bibliography and Annotated Bibliography in proper format and style (see handout for MFA-IA Annotated Bibliography suggestions and the library Writing & Citing page: http://lits.goddard.edu/writecite)
  • With the remaining time, invite participants to try researching using their method and some of our tips. Suggest that their own questions, realizations, struggles, etc. would be great teachable moments for everyone and encourage them to workshop aloud as they think of things.
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