Health-care providers fall short on stress management!

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According to a recent survey (2012) by the American Psychological Association (APA), when it comes to stress management and wellness, there is a gap between what Americans want from their health-care system and what they actually get.

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Health-care providers fall short on stress management!

  1. 1. SCRIBBLE PAD Health-care providers fall short on stress management! According to a recent survey (2012) by the American Psychological Association (APA), when it comes to stress management and wellness, there is a gap between what Americans want from their health-care system and what they actually get.
  2. 2. “Stressed out” = the new normal? Stress is so commonplace in American culture that a Google search generates millions of results with essays, opinions, articles, and news reports on what stress does and what stress is doing to us. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2012/impact.aspx
  3. 3. The Stress in America survey Since its inception, the Stress in America survey has explored the place that stress has in American life and the impact it is having on our health and wellness. The 2012 survey findings illustrate a scenario in which Americans consistently experience stress at levels higher than they think is healthy. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2012/impact.aspx
  4. 4. Some of the hard facts are Almost three-quarters (72 percent) of respondents say that their stress level has increased or stayed the same over the past five years and 80 percent say their stress level has increased or stayed the same in the past year. The number of Americans reporting extreme stress continues to be high – 20 percent said their stress is an 8, 9, or 10 on a 10-point scale. Over the past five years, 60 percent of adults have tried to reduce their stress. More than half (53 percent) are still trying to meet this goal. Only 37 percent of Americans feel they are actually doing an excellent or very good job of managing their stress. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2012/impact.aspx
  5. 5. Plus a few more hard facts Approximately seven in 10 Americans report that they experience:  physical (69 percent) symptoms of stress  non-physical (67 percent) symptoms of stress Symptoms include:  irritability or anger (37 percent)  fatigue (37 percent)  feeling overwhelmed (35 percent)  changes in sleeping habits (30 percent) Many people are not coping effectively with stress:  people report lying awake (42 percent)  overeating or eating unhealthy foods (36 percent)  skipping meals (27) percent in the past month due to stress www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2012/impact.aspx
  6. 6. Top sources of stress include  Money (69 percent)  Work (65 percent)  Economy (61 percent)  Family responsibilities (57 percent)  Family health problems (52 percent)  Personal health problems (51 percent) www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2012/impact.aspx
  7. 7. State of the health care system Findings from the survey suggest that people are not receiving what they need from their health care providers to manage stress and lifestyle and behavior changes to improve health. For example, though 32 percent of Americans say it is very/extremely important to talk with their health care providers about stress management, only 17 percent report that these conversations are happening often or always. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2013/02/stress-management.aspx
  8. 8. A health care expert’s opinion “Unfortunately, our country’s health system often neglects psychological and behavioral factors that are essential to managing stress and chronic diseases. In order for our nation to get healthier, lower the rates of chronic illnesses, and lower health care costs, we need to improve how we view and treat stress and unhealthy behaviors that are contributing to the high incidence of disease in the U.S.” – Norman B. Anderson, PhD and APA CEO www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2013/02/stress-management.aspx
  9. 9. Little or no stress management support More than half (53 percent) of Americans say they receive little or no support for stress management from their providers, and 39 percent say they have little or no behavior management support. U.S. adults with high stress (69 percent) say their stress has increased in the past year, yet 33 percent say that they never discuss ways to manage stress with their health care provider. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2013/02/stress-management.aspx
  10. 10. Millennials feeling challenged Millennials (age 18-33) are feeling especially challenged in handling their stress and receiving health care that meets their needs as they report an average stress level of 5.4 on a 10-point scale, exceeding the national average (4.9).  Are less likely to than people nationwide to give their health care an “A” grade (25 percent versus 31 percent).  Only 17 percent think their health care provider supports them a “lot or a great deal” for stress management and 23 percent for behavior changes and healthy lifestyle changes. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2013/02/stress-management.aspx
  11. 11. Adults with a chronic illness Although Americans dealing with a chronic illness see their health care provider more frequently than those without a chronic illness, it doesn’t mean they receive better stress management care.  51 percent of those with a chronic illnesses see their health care provider three or more times annually compared with only 17 percent for those without a chronic illness.  Despite more frequent visits, only 25 percent of those with a chronic illness, say that they get “a great deal or a lot” of stress management support from their health care provider. www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2013/02/stress-management.aspx
  12. 12. Health care falling down...so what? An extreme amount of stress can have negative health consequences and adversely affect the immune, cardiovascular, neuroendocrine and central nervous systems. Untreated chronic stress can result in serious health conditions including anxiety, insomnia, muscle pain, high blood pressure and a weakened immune system. The consequences of chronic stress are serious, particularly as it contributes to anxiety and depression. www.apa.org/helpcenter/understanding-chronic-stress.aspx
  13. 13. Fix it..change it..address it HOW? APA’s Stress in America survey revealed that 33 percent of Americans never discuss ways to manage stress with their health care provider. Be assertive...have that discussion! It is important to “take charge” and have an ongoing discussion with your healthcare providers. The research is clear that chronic stress can be managed and mastered with appropriate interventions such as lifestyle and behavior change, therapy, and in some situations, medication. www.apa.org/helpcenter/understanding-chronic-stress.aspx
  14. 14. Presentation by David Grinstead, MA, CHt Clinical Hypnotist – Life Coach Website: livealife.biz Email: coachg@livealife.biz Phone: 336-380-0203

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