Lang zullen we leren – 20 jaar CevoraSymposium10/12/10, Square Brussels Meeting Centre                    Current trends a...
The core ideas of lifelong learning  LLL covers   all learning activities throughout life (fl, nfl, ifl)   within person...
Overall aims of lifelong learning Employability      Ability to progress towards or get into employment, to stay in emplo...
The emergence of a lifelong learning policy Global trends shaped policies on learning (UNESCO, OECD, EU) Emergence of a ...
Lifelong learning in a nutshell                                  |5
Benchmarks      5 benchmarks for 2010                  5 benchmarks for 2020No more than 10% early school            at le...
Progress towards meeting the 5 2010 benchmarks                                                 |7
Lifelong learning – main messages LLL is a reality for the majority of people in DK, SE, IS, FI, UK, NL Participation ab...
Participation of adults in LLLSource: LFS database, October 2009)                                      |9
Students in IVET at ISCED level 3     (as % of all students in education at ISCED level 3)9080                            ...
Participation in job-related/non job-related edu. + training                                                              ...
% of employees participating in CVT courses70                         5960                                                ...
Who is falling behind? Slow progress in combating early leaving from education and training /  drop out prevention. PL, C...
Who is falling behind? % of 18-24 years old with less thanupper secondary education and not in e+t                        ...
Education + Training 2010 - main policy initiatives  an integrated policy   ICT for innovation and       promoting       f...
Education + Training 2011-2020 - The Bruges Communiqué                                                         intensifyin...
Key priorities Realising the shift to learning outcomes Validation and recognition of prior learning Qualifications fra...
Why is the shift to learning outcomes a key priority? Anticipated benefits:     Focussing on students: Individual learnin...
The linkage between LOs, QFs and RPL Political tools Assist in reading and comparing learning outcomes and qualification...
Preconditions to implement a QF anda validation system Describe all qualifications that can be obtained and all forms of ...
Driving forward the agenda (National) legal frameworks for LLL, QFs, RPL etc. Assessment of LOs and prior learning: meth...
Happy Birthday, Cevora!                          | 22
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Symposium Levenslang leren - On n'a pas tous les jours 20 ans, S. Bohlinger

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Symposium Levenslang leren - On n'a pas tous les jours 20 ans, S. Bohlinger

  1. 1. Lang zullen we leren – 20 jaar CevoraSymposium10/12/10, Square Brussels Meeting Centre Current trends and challenges in Europe’s lifelong learning areaProf. Dr. Sandra Bohlinger M.A.Professor of Education
  2. 2. The core ideas of lifelong learning LLL covers  all learning activities throughout life (fl, nfl, ifl)  within personal, civic, social or employment related contexts Background: shifts in e + t and in labour market demands  View of the educational process:  From: Education is an input-based learning process expressed in terms of workload, content and lenght of studies (semesters, years etc.)  To: Education is an outcomes-based learning process expressed in terms of knowledge, skills and competences achieved by the learner  View on the degree:  From: Proof of participation and successful completion of a programme  To: Recognition of achieved learning outcomes / prior learning |2
  3. 3. Overall aims of lifelong learning Employability Ability to progress towards or get into employment, to stay in employment and to move on in the workplace Knowledge and skills must be economically valuable Developing personality Personal fulfilment Holistic understanding of learning processes Active citizenship Participating actively in democracy and society Inclusive education Lifelong learning is key to employability and social inclusion ensuring that qualifications and skills meet changing demands in the workplace and in daily life |3
  4. 4. The emergence of a lifelong learning policy Global trends shaped policies on learning (UNESCO, OECD, EU) Emergence of a European LLL policy: 1993: Delors report on growth, employment and competitiveness 1995: White Book on „Teaching and Learning” 1996: European LLL year 2000: LLL Memorandum + Lisbon agenda 2001: communication on „Making a European area of lifelong learning a reality” 2002: Copenhagen declaration: European strategy for enhanced cooperation in VET 2006: ‘Key competences for lifelong learning’ (Recommendation of the European Parliament) 2010: Bruges Communiqué on enhanced European Cooperation in VET (2011- 2020) |4
  5. 5. Lifelong learning in a nutshell |5
  6. 6. Benchmarks 5 benchmarks for 2010 5 benchmarks for 2020No more than 10% early school at least 95% of children between 4leavers; years old and the age for startingDecrease of at least 20% in the compulsory primary educationpercentage of low-achieving pupils in participate in early childhoodreading literacy; educationAt least 85% of young people should the share of early leavers should behave completed upper secondary less than10%education; the share of low-achieving 15-yearsIncrease of at least 15% in the number olds in reading, mathematics andof tertiary graduates in MST, with a science should be less than15%.simultaneous decrease in the gender the share of 30-34 year olds withimbalance; tertiary educational attainment 12.5% of the adult population should be at least 40%participate in lifelong learning. an average of at least 15 % of adults should participate in lifelong learning |6
  7. 7. Progress towards meeting the 5 2010 benchmarks |7
  8. 8. Lifelong learning – main messages LLL is a reality for the majority of people in DK, SE, IS, FI, UK, NL Participation above average in BE, DE, ES, FR, AT, SI and NO Some countries have coherent + overarching LLL strategies (DK, FI, SI, UK-Scotland) Close to 10% of adults have participated in LLL within a four weeks period Almost 60% of young people (5-29 year-old) participate in education Secondary enrolment rates are above 85% in nearly all member states and well above 90% in 8 countries (FR, LT, NL, CZ, SI, FI, SE, UK) HE enrolment is over 50% in nearly all member states and above 80% in 4 countries (DK, EL, FI, SI) reaching levels near or above the level of the US (82%) |8
  9. 9. Participation of adults in LLLSource: LFS database, October 2009) |9
  10. 10. Students in IVET at ISCED level 3 (as % of all students in education at ISCED level 3)9080 77,1 72,9 74,2 72,370 67,1 67,9 64,8 64,5 62,1 59,460 57,5 56,8 52,3 50,3 50,150 48 46,2 43,8 44,240 33,9 34,8 32 30,9 30,7 31,430 26,3 24,420 12,610 0 | 10
  11. 11. Participation in job-related/non job-related edu. + training | 11
  12. 12. % of employees participating in CVT courses70 5960 49 5050 46 46 40 3940 38 34 35 34 33 33 32 33 33 30 29 30 2930 28 24 2120 17 15 15 15 16 1410 0 | 12
  13. 13. Who is falling behind? Slow progress in combating early leaving from education and training / drop out prevention. PL, CZ, SK and FI already perform well with a share of early leavers below 10% The probability that a young migrant is an early leaver is more than double than that for a national (26.8% vs. 13.6%) Participation of adults in LLL is not equally available to all groups of adults; rates are higher among the youngest (25 to 34 years old), the most educated and the employed Main obstacles to participation in nfL / adult education is family responsibilities, conflicts with the work schedule, costs of training and lack of employer’s support | 13
  14. 14. Who is falling behind? % of 18-24 years old with less thanupper secondary education and not in e+t | 14
  15. 15. Education + Training 2010 - main policy initiatives an integrated policy ICT for innovation and promoting framework LLL multilingualism enhanced developing lifelong removing obstacles to co-operation in VET learning strategies mobility and adult education higher education European Institute of developing school reform Technology education policies | 15
  16. 16. Education + Training 2011-2020 - The Bruges Communiqué intensifying co- fostering innovation, making IVET a more operation between VET creativity and attractive option policy and other policy entrepreneurship areas improving quality fostering excellence in realising inclusive VET assurance and IVET and CVET comparability enabling access to greater involvement of making good use of training and stakeholders EU support qualifications internationalisation of co-ordinated IVET and CVET + governance of fostering mobility instruments | 16
  17. 17. Key priorities Realising the shift to learning outcomes Validation and recognition of prior learning Qualifications frameworks and credit point systems Fostering mobility, permeability and access to LLL Applying Guidelines and referring to the CQARF Anticipation of skills needs Providing a better linkage between learning + qualifications  the labour market | 17
  18. 18. Why is the shift to learning outcomes a key priority? Anticipated benefits: Focussing on students: Individual learning process is at the core of attention Recognising student achievements outside of the formal learning setting Enhancing students’ employability Promoting transferability, permeability, mobility, quality and transparency Widening participation and access | 18
  19. 19. The linkage between LOs, QFs and RPL Political tools Assist in reading and comparing learning outcomes and qualifications Expected to provide impetus for modernisation initiatives in education systems (VET and HE) NQFs: development and classification of qualifications, related to learning levels and descriptors, scope: all learning achievements and pathways, bindingness (~ 120 worldwide) Meta frameworks / regional frameworks: relate NQFs, to create confidence and trust, defines basic principles, voluntary basis (EQF, SADCQF, CQF) Validation systems and initiatives: assessment and certification of ifl + nfl (with regard to fl + qualifications); scope: all learning achievements, voluntary basis | 19
  20. 20. Preconditions to implement a QF anda validation system Describe all qualifications that can be obtained and all forms of learning suited for accreditation in terms of learning outcomes Depict all qualifications in a hierarchy or continuum to identify learning levels Assess all qualifications independently of the form or provision, curriculum, and teaching methods via which they were acquired Modularise all qualifications, assign them to different levels with the same descriptors and describe them in terms of learning hours (learning units) Employ benchmarks to accredit and assess all types of learning | 20
  21. 21. Driving forward the agenda (National) legal frameworks for LLL, QFs, RPL etc. Assessment of LOs and prior learning: methods and criteria Gathering relevant, reliable and comparable data (particularly: ifL) Scope, acceptance and impact of LLL, QFs and RPL (and similar political tools) Financing and acceptance Black box issues:  the impact of LLL on improving qualification systems, labour markets and individual employability  How to identify, recognise, validate and assess learning achievements outside of the formal learning setting | 21
  22. 22. Happy Birthday, Cevora! | 22

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