Stages of Second Language Acquisition

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  • Stages of Second Language Acquisition

    1. 1. Stages of Second Language Acquisition by Judie Haynes Cecilia Maller A. Young Learners Workshop UST
    2. 2. What do you think about these ideas? • 1. All new learners of English progress through the same stages to acquire language.
    3. 3. • 2. However, the length of time each student spends at a particular stage may vary greatly.
    4. 4. Stage I: Pre-production
    5. 5. Silent Period: • 500 words in receptive vocabulary – not yet speaking. • Repeat everything Ts ( parents) say.
    6. 6. • Not producing lg. : PARROTING. • Listen: attentively. • Respond: to pictures and visuals.
    7. 7. • Show comprehension: How?? • Understand and duplicate gestures,movements. • **Go to : Melhorvideoano
    8. 8. What kind of method will work well with them?
    9. 9. TPR • You as Ts must focus attention on: • listening comprehension activies and receptive vocabulary
    10. 10. Now let´s introduce a song • Ideas on how to do it…
    11. 11. Hippo Which animal is this? Is it big or small? Can you spell HIPPO?
    12. 12. Eating
    13. 13. Chocolate
    14. 14. Lying
    15. 15. MUD
    16. 16. LAKE
    17. 17. BLOWING BUBBLES
    18. 18. Introduce the Hippo Song • Check vocabulary. • Teach TPR actions where possible. • Ss listen to the song for general understanding. • Ss sing along. • “A happy hippo holiday”
    19. 19. What do kids need at this stage? • Much repetition of English
    20. 20. Stage II: Early production • This period may last 6 months: • Ss develop receptive and active vocabulary ( 1000 words).
    21. 21. • Speak in 1 or 2 word phrases. • Use of memorized short language chunks ( =a large part or amount of something)
    22. 22. Suggestions for working with Ss in this stage: • Ask yes/no and either/or questions. • Accept one or two word responses. • Give students the opportunity to participate in some of the whole class activities.
    23. 23. • Use pictures and realia to support questions ( answers).
    24. 24. • Modify content information to the language level of ELLs.
    25. 25. • Build vocabulary using pictures.
    26. 26. A Parade
    27. 27. • Provide listening activities.
    28. 28. The Ghost- reader
    29. 29. • Simplify the content materials to be used. • Focus on key vocabulary and concepts.
    30. 30. • Support learning with graphic organizers, charts and graphs.
    31. 31. • Begin to foster writing in English through labeling and short sentences. • (To help to develop a skill)
    32. 32. The biggest house on earth. Vanderbuilt´s house
    33. 33. • Use a frame to scaffold( =structure to help ) writing. • Ex.
    34. 34. FORM Examples: • You are watching TV. • Are you watching TV? • You are not watching TV. • So: • [am/is/are + present participle= V+ing]
    35. 35. Stage III: Speech emergence
    36. 36. Characteristics • Vocabulary of about 3000 words. • Can communicate with simple phrases and sentences. • Will ask simple Qs- not grammatically correct
    37. 37. • Iniciate short conversations. • Understand easy stories read in class +pictures.
    38. 38. Here are some simple tasks they can complete • · Sound out stories phonetically. • · Read short, modified texts in content area subjects.
    39. 39. • · Complete graphic organizers with word banks. • · Understand and answer questions about charts and graphs. • · Match vocabulary words to definitions.
    40. 40. • · Study flashcards with content area vocabulary(example). • · Participate in duet ( a piece of music for two performers), pair and choral reading activities.
    41. 41. • · Write and illustrate riddles.
    42. 42. • · Understand teacher explanations and two-step directions. • · Compose brief stories based on personal experience. • · Write in dialogue journals.
    43. 43. What are dialogue journals? • Dialogue journals are a conversation between the teacher and the student. • They are especially helpful with English language learners. • WHY??
    44. 44. • Students can write about topics that interest them and proceed at their own level and pace. They have a place to express their thoughts and ideas.
    45. 45. • Stage IV: Intermediate fluency • At this stage Ss...
    46. 46. • Have a vocabulary of 6000 active words. • Use more complex sentences when speaking and writing.
    47. 47. Willing to express opinions and share thoughts
    48. 48. • Will ask Qs to clarify what they are learning. • Able to work in grade level math and science classes with Ts support. • Comprehension of Eng. Literature and Social Studies content- increases.
    49. 49. • .. At this stage, students will use strategies from their native language to learn content in English.
    50. 50. Many errors when writing ( complexity of English grammar and sentence structure) • Able to translate written assignments from native language.
    51. 51. • Make inferences from that learning • Able to synthesize what learnt
    52. 52. • This is the time for teachers to focus on learning strategies. • Post lecture- Homework: • What is a learning strategy? • Which are the learning strategies? Just mention them.
    53. 53. • Stage V: Advanced Fluency
    54. 54. • It takes students from 4-10 years to achieve cognitive academic language proficiency in a second language. • .Student at this stage will be near- native in their ability to perform in content area learning.
    55. 55. • At the beginning of this stage, however, they will need continued support from classroom teachers especially in content areas such as history/social studies and in writing.

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