Moving toward a better understanding

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Moving toward a better understanding

  1. 1. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  2. 2. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  3. 3. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  4. 4. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  5. 5. University Learning Outcomes Assessment (UniLOA) Domains Critical Thinking Self-Awareness Communication Diversity Citizenship Membership & Leadership Relationships
  6. 6. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  7. 7. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  8. 8. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  9. 9. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  10. 10. Current Challenge: Adequately defining “student success” in ways that lead to effective supports, services, interventions, and processes (SSIPs) The current definition of “student success” appears to focus on: Accessibility Affordability Retention/Persistence Graduation Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  11. 11. National Center for Education Statistics 6-year Graduation Rate% 55.5% 15% 30% • 21 students million enrolled • 14% increase through 2019 • Females are awarded 57% of all undergraduate degrees 3% Students at extremely high risk US Citizens with Bachelor’s Degree PhD or Professional Degrees • Normal distribution theory • 1% Research Doctorates • 2% Professional Degrees Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  12. 12. Tinto’s Model of Student Departure Input Variables GLD as a result of inputs and interaction Interaction with the environment Academic Integration Individual Attributes Teaching and Learning Qualifications Facilities Preparation Supports Financial Assistance Skills, qualities, attributes, qualifications to manage professional, personal, interpersonal, and intrapersonal experiences Social Integration
  13. 13. Critical Thinking Self-Awareness Communication Diversity Citizenship Membership & Leadership Relationships Evaluating, analyzing, assess, interpreting, questionin g, and restating problems and challenges. Conscious awareness of self and others; internally and externally, and knowing one’s place in the environment Effectively conveying messages and information to others through a variety of methods Understanding and appreciating differences in others. Active participation in the external environment to improve life for self and others Working with and guiding others for the common good Effective interaction with others in a variety of professional, personal and interpersonal settings Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  14. 14. The current higher education paradigm appears to focus on STRUCTURE AND THROUGHPUT which attend to the cognitive and behavioral domains but largely ignore the affective domain. Yet, students’ decisions to remain in college and the effort expended to do so are largely grounded in the affective domain Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  15. 15. A number of individual findings have been made by the UniLOA Project. Some of the findings are consistent with those of other researchers of higher education while other findings are novel as a result of the unique nature of what and how the UniLOA actually measures student growth, learning, and development. Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  16. 16. Fraternity and Sorority membership appears to improve GLD Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  17. 17. The lowest scored item in 6 of the 7 UniLOA domains are directly tied to oral communications skills UniLOA Domain Item Score Lowest Scored Item Critical Thinking 71.20 I am good at describing things in class. For example, I answer the teacher’s questions when we are reviewing material. Self-Awareness 55.68 I list my personal goals for a class or activity. For example, I list my learning goals for a class beyond the learning outcomes listed in the syllabus, as well as my goal for a grade. Communication 69.19 I make sure that when I am talking with someone I change my communication style to be consistent with their world view. For example, when speaking to someone who is devoutly religious I take that into account when I speak with them. Diversity 67.19 I can tell anyone what diversity is. For example, I have a “standard answer” when someone asks me about diversity. Citizenship 60.76 I engage in the political process through voicing viewpoints. For example, I write letters to the editor, engage in debate with others, or contact political leaders to voice my opinion 69.66 I engage in constructive dialog rather than arguments. For example, when I confront others I focus on minimizing a negative emotional response from people I’m confronting 67.04 I use effective networking skills. For example, I go out of my comfort zone to introduce myself to and establish and maintain an appropriate relationship with others, such as my professors and supervisors Membership and Leadership Relationships
  18. 18. Students’ engagement of an effective “goal-oriented approach” appears to be lacking Item I list my personal goals for a class or activity. For example, I list my learning goals for a class beyond the learning outcomes listed in the syllabus, as well as my goal for a grade. Note: 2007-2008 National Mean 2008-2009 National Mean 2009-2010 National Mean 49.4 52.4 55.68 The average UniLOA item score is approximately 72 Score differences of 3 points is considered significant. Significance increases in a geometric as opposed to arithmetic pattern Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  19. 19. Indiana’s college students tend to function at a level higher than that of the national average 80 78 76 74 72 70 68 66 64 62 60 National Means Indiana Means Note: The data used to generate Indiana results are influenced by a large number of fraternity/sorority members which will drive scores somewhat in the positive direction Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  20. 20. Consistent with human and student development theories and supported by observations of students actively participating in fraternities, sororities, and intercollegiate athletics, it would appear that engagement in MANAGED RELATION-RICH ACTIVITIES supports higher levels of holistic growth, learning, and development Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  21. 21. A Dynamic Student Development Model (DSDM) Dependency Independence Interdependency Entry Phase Middle Phase Nearing Graduation Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana
  22. 22. It is critical that individual institutions better operationalize their definition of the “Student Success” construct to better inform the development and accurate assessment of supports, services, interventions and programs. What college can and should be What college presently “is” Moving from what “is” to what it “can” be (requires more accurate operationalization Commitment to constant improvement
  23. 23. The WHAT or the HOW Professional Identity Professional Experience Professional Skills Center for Measuring College Student Behaviors and Academics – Bayh College of Education – Indiana State University – Terre Haute, Indiana

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