A New Breed of Activism

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Gautam Raju and Eyal Halamish

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  • Hello , can you give more examples on this point ? or mention what Sandor Vegh said about (action/reaction) ? because i think you guys used the book 'Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice' and i really need to understand this point but unfortunately the book is not available where i live , i just have read the outlines and i guess i can order it on line but i would take like for ever so if u can help me here , i'll be thankful for you.

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  • How many people use social media in their organisation ? How many people use social media personally ? - How many people use facebook as their preferred social media tool ? How many people don’t use social media at all ? Name Where are you from ? What activism means to you ? What you want to get out of today
  • SHOW VIDEO ABOUT IRAN http://vimeo.com/2232226 What do you think? How does this apply to the work you do?
  • Activism is about influencing a lot of people seeing things for the better. You can change the world. The online space enables you and others to influence one another and to see things for the better…or worse. According to a Zogby International Study in 2008, 2/3 of Americans believe traditional journalism is ‘out of touch’ Dan Froomkin, Washington Post journalist, warns that mainstream political journalism is in danger of “becoming increasingly irrelevant” if it doesn’t “call bullshit” and cease publishing spin as news. Walter Pincus, Washington Post journalist challenges the mainstream media to refuse carrying any official comment that is “designed solely as a public relations tool, offerning no new or valuable information to the public.”
  • Activism is about influencing a lot of people seeing things for the better. You can change the world. The online space enables you and others to influence one another and to see things for the better…or worse. According to a Zogby International Study in 2008, 2/3 of Americans believe traditional journalism is ‘out of touch’ Dan Froomkin, Washington Post journalist, warns that mainstream political journalism is in danger of “becoming increasingly irrelevant” if it doesn’t “call bullshit” and cease publishing spin as news. Walter Pincus, Washington Post journalist challenges the mainstream media to refuse carrying any official comment that is “designed solely as a public relations tool, offerning no new or valuable information to the public.”
  • Hacktvism: Bringing down other websites using internet tools, sending viruses, flooding servers (drive-by spamming). Using online tools to take down other websites. (Indian Students Association attacking Australian government) Online protest: Using online media to promote advocacy around an issue (Avaaz, Getup, Moveon) Alternative online outlets: Using online media to advocate for particular policy shifts (Breakthrough Generation, Monbiot) Web spoofing: Mimicking the non-tech-savvy with better websites and communication (Nestle, Shell) Flash mobbing: Mobilising to raise funds for or pleasurable awareness of issues. (350.org flashmobbing) MVDA – Online censorship and pop-ups (Electronic Frontiers Australia) Human rights activists now use technologies and techniques to achieve their traditional goals. There are two major ways in which these forms of activism on the right can be characterised: Internet enhanced Internet based What do you think is the difference between activism today compared with the past ?
  • Keyboard activism/ineffective: Needs to be intergenerational (old pollies won’t engage, but young people inspire), make it user-driven not template driven (getup and building ownership of users by letting them write their own emails) Spam: Pick your battles, this can tarnish your reputation if you do it all the time Culturally sensitive (Motrin Moms, Westpac Bananas): This is an art, not a skill, it is gained over time and with reputation build
  • Author Sandor Vegh divides online activism into three main categories: Awareness/advocacy , organization/mobilization , and action/reaction .
  • Every campaign will need a website which advocates and builds awareness around the issues involved in their campaign.
  • Over 300,000 members Strong fundraising capability and call to action How do they do it ? Getup will create an online media/ tool and mobillise and organise people around the tool (e.g. video of expert or activist in the field, build campaign around helping this person) http://www.youtube.com/user/getupaustralia Simon Sheikh and Copenhagen and Ministers and diplomats to make commitments with a threat that he would go put a message on his site if they didn’t.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7SZyidY7mQ Greenpeace launched a campaign against Nestle with a video on youtube. Nestle threatened Youtube to take the video off or they would sue. Video went down and went up on other sites such as vimeo. Greenpeace mobilized its supporters worldwide to lobby via their social media page on facebook and twitter (over 90,000 people went on the Nestle facebook page) Nestle reacted by deleting comments and responding aggressively to activists The issue went viral and Nestle’s reputation is quite low now. Nestle expects to eliminate all traces of palm oil from Sinar Mas from its supply chain by mid-May
  • Millions of members worldwide Using all components of online activism New perspective on issues? One of our Oursay colleagues was one of the aliens here.
  • Understand the online ecosystem and know the tools
  • Tribe 1: Who they are: Engineers, Technofiles What they understand: Tools, widgets, and apps What they use: Social networks and personalised content pages Tribe 2: Who they are: Movie Stars, Creatives What they understand: Videos and content What they use: Mobile and video sharing sites Tribe 3: Politicians, NGOs, dreamers What they understand: Ideas and assets What they use: Websites and emails
  • Plan Focus Target (PFT): Don’t run all of your campaigns at once. Hub your website: Hub your website with social networking arms Keep it Simple Stupid (KiSS): Twitter factor, engaging, readable and easy (Mac research on attention span online) React & respond in real time: This is your new P.R. wing (google: Social Media ROI) Enable collaboration: Twitter and Facebook’s success is based on this
  • http://www.digiactive.org/2008/06/28/guide-a-digiactive-introduction-to-facebook-activism/ Now that you have your campaign in mind (target, media, decision-maker, stakeholders), how do you use facebook? What is it? Huge user base Easy and free! Collaborative How do you use it? Page vs. group Encourage dialogue Spread the word
  • http://www.digiactive.org/wp-content/uploads/digiactive_twitter_guide_v1-0.pdf Do follow interesting people from the start. Maybe drop them an @ message in the beginning telling them how you found them, and why you are following them. This will get your conversation started and you will learn how to use Twitter while engaging with people who were there before you. Don‘t follow people indiscriminately. If you cannot engage with the people you are following, Twitter becomes an ordinary and very short RSS feed. If you follow someone, follow them because you are interested in the things they do and you want to read about it, not because you are collecting people like stamps or butterflies. If you are not interested in the people you are following, it will show and your Twitter persona will lose credibility and your cause along with it. Do write engaging messages about the things you do or hear. Drop a message if you read something interesting. Use the Re-Tweeting convention if another user’s message caught your eye and you want others to know about it. This will enable your followers to connect with other members of your community of interest. Chances are most of them don’t know each other. Use you Twitter feed to share the wealth and shed some light on other interesting folks. Don‘t use Twitter simply as an automatic news feed to your blog. It is tempting to use Twitter as a simple “push” medium. Although you could use it only to send messages about new content on your blog or ask people to participate in an event, this will not help your feed. Twitter is not a news feed. Twitter is a conversation tool. Keep it personal. Give your feed a voice. Don‘t just write when you want something from your followers. Be there for them. Ask them what they expect following your feed. Try to engage them in an open conversation. Do keep Tweeting. Tweet often. You will not be great at Twitter, not at first anyhow. So keep at it. A guide can only go so far. You have to learn what works for you and your followers. You will only find your way to Twitter if you take a few wrong turns. So keep learning while Tweeting. Don‘t allow for long gaps of inactivity. Twitter is to be used often and it works best as a semiconstant stream of messages. For the occasional deep insight use your blog. With Twitter, the signal lies not in the occasional Tweet, it lies in the stream. 15 Do be very careful with automation. There are quite a few scripts out there that promise to automate various functions of your Twitter feed. This includes, for example, the automatic following of Twitterers who follow your Twitter feed or the automated following of Twitterers who use certain, predefined keywords. This might seem to be a simple way to keep routine tasks away from you and free you for the bigger and better stuff but it can be negative. By frequently turning to automated solutions you might lose the personal touch - the most important appeal of a Twitter feed. What appears to save you time can actually lead you to alienating your audience.5 Don‘t automatically send direct messages. No matter how you decide on other automated scripts, this advice bears repeating: do not automatically send direct message. A direct message is a personal notice to someone. If you automatically send direct messages to all your followers you are abusing this function of the service, and they won’t be happy about it. Don’t fall in the trap of the marketinghypsters and pyramid-business-model-schemers and forego the temptation to spam your audience. Trust me, it’s just not worth it! What is it? 140 character sound bites Micro-blogging Conversational linking (Hey, check this out!) Applications and #tag conversations How do you use it? Tweet, retweet, and #tagyourcampaign Selectively follow relevant organisations Get inspired by your followings and followers Respond to everyone Post interesting articles Get chatty: ask questions
  • http://mashable.com/2010/03/26/non-profits-youtube/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiwch2VINds&feature=player_embedded
  • Think of a campaign What’s our ask, what do we want changed Make a Blog using wordpress Post your campaign Facebook profile and group Twitter.com Youtube.com
  • Mention OurSay
  • Mention OurSay
  • A New Breed of Activism

    1. 1. The New Breed of Activism What it is, How it is applied, How you use it By: Gautam Raju and Eyal Halamish
    2. 3. <ul><li>What is Online Activism? </li></ul><ul><li>How it is applied today? </li></ul><ul><li>How you can use it? </li></ul>Learning Objectives
    3. 4. E-Activism?
    4. 5. New Media
    5. 6. New Media Culture
    6. 7. New Activism Traditional Activism New Activism Street protest / boycotts, strikes, traditional forms of non- violent direct action ‘ Hacktivism’ - Denial of Service Attacks Occupations, leaflets, petitions , non-violent confrontation Online protest, email campaigns, e-mobilisation and viral marketing Lobbying members of parliament Alternative online media outlets (blogging) and information resources, online forums Culture jamming / “subvertising” Web spoofing and digital impersonation Benefit / fundraisers / celebrities for awareness ‘ Flash mobbing’
    7. 8. <ul><li>Keyboard activism/ineffective </li></ul><ul><li>Spam </li></ul><ul><li>Culturally sensitive </li></ul>Critics
    8. 9. How does it work?
    9. 10. Awareness/Advocacy
    10. 11. Organisation/Mobilisation
    11. 12. Action/Reaction
    12. 13. A Leader in Practice
    13. 14. So how do you do it?
    14. 15. Online Ecosystem
    15. 16. <ul><li>Plan Focus Target (PFT) </li></ul><ul><li>Hub your website </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it Simple Stupid (KiSS) </li></ul><ul><li>React & respond in real time </li></ul><ul><li>Build communities of collaboration </li></ul>Online tools
    16. 17. <ul><li>What is it? </li></ul><ul><li>Huge user base </li></ul><ul><li>Easy and free! </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>How do you use it? </li></ul><ul><li>Page vs. group </li></ul><ul><li>Build your networks </li></ul><ul><li>Spread the word </li></ul><ul><li>Be active in engagement and collaboration </li></ul>Facebook
    17. 19. Twitter <ul><li>What is it? </li></ul><ul><li>140 character sound bites </li></ul><ul><li>Micro-blogging </li></ul><ul><li>Conversational linking (Hey, check this out!) </li></ul><ul><li>Applications and #tag conversations </li></ul><ul><li>How do you use it? </li></ul><ul><li>Tweet, retweet, and #tagyourcampaign </li></ul><ul><li>Follow (selectively?) </li></ul><ul><li>Get chatty, post articles, ask questions </li></ul>
    18. 21. Youtube <ul><li>What is it? </li></ul><ul><li>Video sharing and collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Five ways you can use it: </li></ul><ul><li>Non-profit Youtube program </li></ul><ul><li>Video annotations </li></ul><ul><li>Find a Volunteer </li></ul><ul><li>Optimise your videos </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement – Youtube insight </li></ul>
    19. 23. Blogs <ul><li>What is it? </li></ul><ul><li>This is your social media hub </li></ul><ul><li>Promotion/advocacy with or without feedback </li></ul><ul><li>How do you use it? </li></ul><ul><li>It’s the easiest website you will ever make </li></ul><ul><li>Build a brief profile </li></ul><ul><li>Set an agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Post frequently, REDDIT and DIGG </li></ul><ul><li>Link to other social media and networks </li></ul>
    20. 25. Let’s build an online campaign!
    21. 26. Thank you Gautam Raju - gautamnraju@gmail.com Eyal Halamish – halamishe@gmail.com
    22. 27. Links Mashable - Facebook Guidebook http://mashable.com/guidebook/facebook/ Digiactive - Facebook How to Guide http://www.digiactive.org/wp-content/uploads/digiactive_facebook_activism.pdf Mashable - Twitter Guidebook http://mashable.com/guidebook/twitter/ Digiactive - Twitter How to Guide http://www.digiactive.org/wp-content/uploads/digiactive_twitter_guide_v1-0.pdf Building a online community http://www.feverbee.com/2010/01/how-to-build-an-online-community-the-ultimate-list-of-resources.html

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