Evaluating Health Promotion Strategies for Public Health Impact

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Workshop presentation at the 2013 Ontario Public Health Convention (TOPHC) looking at social media use in public health and the strategies available for evaluating those strategies in practice. Tools, methods and approaches are outlined along with the inherent challenges in dealing with a dynamic social communication environment.

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  • The social media strategy cycle involves an iterative set of steps. As with any circle, there is no definitive start point, however typically you are starting from reflection and synthesis or listening to your audience/users. A problem can be found in either of these two points on the circle. Although the steps move in a linear-like fashion, there is a reflect-learn-adaptation cycle that takes place during and after each phase to make modifications in real time based on information gleaned from research, practice, design and implementation of the strategy as it unfolds. There is no set expectation for timing within this model. The entire cycle could be completed in day as part of a rapid-response to a topical issue or over the span of many months. You need to constantly be thinking: why are you doing this? What is the point of doing social media?
  • Evaluating Health Promotion Strategies for Public Health Impact

    1. 1. Evaluating Health Promotion Social Media Strategies For Public Health Impact Cameron D. Norman PhD Principal, CENSE Research + Design Adjunct Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto @cdnormanTOPHC 2013, Toronto, ON
    2. 2. Any electronic, networked informationresource that derives its principal valuefrom user contributions & engagement
    3. 3. 10 years later…
    4. 4. 2003
    5. 5. 2013Communication is: Mobile Fast Scalable Flat Non-Linear Narrative Collaborative
    6. 6. Top Selling Mobile Phones in 2003
    7. 7. Top Selling Mobile ‘Phones’ in 2012/3
    8. 8. By the Numbers• Facebook> over 1 billion users (founded 2004)• Twitter> Over 200 million users (founded 2006)• More than 800 unique visitors to YouTube(founded 2005) – 1 trillion views in 2011 Pinterest(founded 2010)
    9. 9. FLAT / NON-LINEAR /
    10. 10. Mental Models of Data• Systems thinking – Looking at wholes rather than parts• System dynamics – Delays – Accumulations – Bottlenecks• Network effects – Connection numbers, types, and clusters – Cliques, contagions, and resistance
    11. 11. 1152812597 52398 55556181601936021932 60909236102712340002 70467 7185848947 60417 516624905752876 57123 29172 5673857580 19111 94826590376094561393 79692 6055666467 4193372193 8532775877 81557 8981976733 16411 99498 1320981605 4286296361 76496 84140 48054 71372 97036 67533 52491 94228 90406 52034 30324 84125 96428 75659 82662 26256 57165 73265 29588 40810 37752 60686 17388 51994 73557 36842 68120 95023 25430 76029 19182 32959 33530 23550 97362 92302 54084 96124 93834
    12. 12. NARRATIVE /COLLABORATIVE
    13. 13. CreatingConversations • Give and take • Engagement vs. Broadcast • Sharing (but not always equal) • Different cadence and pace of information flow • Process and outcomes are developmental, evolving, complex
    14. 14. What is an effective conversation?
    15. 15. Conversation Analysis• Who leads? Who follows? Who participated?• What is said? What is the tone, mood or content of what is shared? – Location? Time? Context?• What ideas take hold?• What is the content of those ideas?
    16. 16. Knowledge Integration• Idea uptake / transfer > ‘stickiness’• To whom are those ideas shared?• How were those ideas shared?• What did anyone do because of what they were exposed to?• Knowledge pathways – how do ideas move into practice• ‘Actionable ideas’
    17. 17. MOBILITY
    18. 18. Taking information with you
    19. 19. And producing it anywhere…
    20. 20. BIG DATA
    21. 21. TOOLS & TECHNOLOGIES
    22. 22. Tools (Examples)Free / Low Cost Premium• Facebook Insights • Hootsuite• Google Analytics • Bottlenose• Google Alerts • Radian 6• Hootsuite • Sysomos• Bottlenose • Beelove• Buffer • SM2• Co-tweet
    23. 23. Measurement and Metrics: TheBasics
    24. 24. Metrics & Indicators: The Basics• # contact / engagement points (e.g., followers)• Type of contacts, # of contacts• Quality, number and type of ideas generated• Citations and references (e.g., re- tweets, mentions)• Quality of engagements & interactions• Size, type and position of network points
    25. 25. Developmental Design Cycles &Overlap
    26. 26. RESOURCES
    27. 27. Julia Belluz (@juliaoftoronto)Who Lives, Who Dies? Will Social Media Decide?2012 Hancock Lecturehttp://feeds.tvo.org/tvobigideas(March 1st, 2013)Science-ish Blog: http://www2.macleans.ca/science-ish/
    28. 28. http://publichealthandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/Social Media Metrics and Evaluation: PTCC Webinar:http://bit.ly/102MrzhSocial Media for Researchers:http://censemaking.com/2013/03/20/social-media-for-researchers/
    29. 29. A Cloudy Future!(?)
    30. 30. Cameron D. Norman PhD@cdnormanwww.cense.cawww.censemaking.com

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