Leading	  Through	  (Social)	  Innova5on	  	                     Leading	  Through	  Innova5on	                       Iowa...
Who	  am	  I?	  •  I	  work	  as	  the	  Senior	  Director	  for	  Digital	  Marke5ng	  &	       Communica5ons	  at	  IMPA...
But	  mostly	  I’m	  an	  “ambassador	  for	  my	  species”	  
“Innova5on	  –	  the	  heart	  of	  the	  knowledge	  economy	  –	  is	  fundamentally	  social”	  –	  Malcolm	  Gladwell	...
1.	  The	  Millennials	  are	  here	  (and	  there	  are	  a	  lot	  of	  them…	  er…	  us.)	  
Who	  are	  Millennials?	  •  	  There	  are	  currently	  nearly	  90	  million	  Millennials	  	  	  	  	  	  	  (born	 ...
How	  are	  they	  different?	      	  •  Compared	  to	  other	  generaCons,	  Millennials	  are	  the	  most:	      •    ...
Genera5on	  Y	  is	  connected	  and	  social	  41%	  of	  Millennials	  have	  made	  a	     33%	  of	  Millennials	  mor...
Why	  should	  organiza5ons	  care?	  •  Millennials	  represent	  the	  single	  largest	  genera5on	  in	  human	     hi...
2.	  We’ve	  all	  gone	  social…	  online	  	  (and	  museums	  have,	  too)	  
Your	  audience	  is	  online	                                                                 •  Social	  media	  account...
What	  influences	  the	  visita5on	  decision-­‐making	  process?	                                      	  Discre5onary	  ...
Diffusion	  of	  Messaging	                                                                                                ...
Public	  sources	  of	  informa5on	                                                                                       ...
Public	  sources	  of	  informa5on	                                                                                       ...
Public	  sources	  of	  informa5on	                                          Amplifica7on:	  What	  is	  the	  re-­‐distrib...
Public	  sources	  of	  informa5on	                               Overall	  Value:	  What	  are	  the	  weighted,	  rela7v...
1.	  Selling	  your	  admission	  (the	  new	  rules	  of	  an	  old	  game)	  
“As	  a	  visitor	  or	  cons5tuent,	  I	  only	  care	  about	  my	                          own	  experience	  with	  th...
“What	  is	  the	  primary	  benefit	  of	  membership?”	                                              	  Based	  on	  IMPA...
“We	  trust	  nonprofits	  more	  than	  big	  companies	  	            because	  they	  do	  the	  most	  “social	  good.”...
Millennials	  are	  public	  service	  mo5vated	                       	  This	  genera5on	  will	  onen	  chose	  social	...
“I	  am	  a	  member	  of	  the	  service	  economy”	  	  I	  am	  a	  member	  of	  the	  experience	  economy	  
Providing	  “transforma5ve	  experiences”	  is	  important	                              	  This	  aligns	  strongly	  wit...
“What	  I	  see	  at	  the	  museum	  is	  most	  important”	  	  Who	  I	  am	  with	  at	  the	  museum	  is	  most	  im...
The	  best	  thing	  about	  a	  visit	  to	  a	  zoo,	  aquarium,	  or	  museum	  
Have	  ques5ons,	  ideas,	  or	  resources?	                              Please	  contact	  me!	  	  cdilenschneider@	   ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Iowa Museum Association Keynote Address - Leading Through Social Innovation

2,437 views

Published on

Keynote presentation delivered for the Iowa Museum Association Annual Conference, 2012

Published in: Career

Iowa Museum Association Keynote Address - Leading Through Social Innovation

  1. 1. Leading  Through  (Social)  Innova5on     Leading  Through  Innova5on   Iowa  Museum  Associa5on   Iowa  City,  Iowa       Colleen  Dilenschneider   IMPACTS  Research  &  Development   22  October  2012    
  2. 2. Who  am  I?  •  I  work  as  the  Senior  Director  for  Digital  Marke5ng  &   Communica5ons  at  IMPACTS  Research  &  Development      •  I  work  with  zoos,  aquariums  and  museums  such  as:     •  Monterey  Bay  Aquarium   •  Wildlife  Conserva5on  Society   •  Carnegie  Science  Center   •  Na5onal  Aquarium     •  Shedd  Aquarium   •  Exploratorium     •  European  Union  Cultural  Consor5um   •  California  Academy  of  Sciences  •  I  believe  in  strengthening  museums  through  data  and   informa5on-­‐share  so  that  they  are  beQer  able  to  meet  both   boQom  lines  (financial  solvency  and  mission  execu5on)    
  3. 3. But  mostly  I’m  an  “ambassador  for  my  species”  
  4. 4. “Innova5on  –  the  heart  of  the  knowledge  economy  –  is  fundamentally  social”  –  Malcolm  Gladwell       1.  The  Millennials  are  here                New  genera5on   2.  We’ve  all  gone  social…  online                New  technologies   3.  Selling  your  admission                  New  rules  (to  old  games)      
  5. 5. 1.  The  Millennials  are  here  (and  there  are  a  lot  of  them…  er…  us.)  
  6. 6. Who  are  Millennials?  •   There  are  currently  nearly  90  million  Millennials              (born  1980  –  1994;  “true”  Millennials  born  1981-­‐  1989)   •  Gen  X:        1965  -­‐  1979   •  Boomers:      1945  -­‐  1964   •  Tradi5onalists    1925  –  1944    •  Characterized  as:     •  Entreprenuerial     •  Tech-­‐savvy   •  Public  service  mo5vated   •  En5tled  and  “over-­‐educated”   •  Connected  and  protected   •  Community-­‐oriented   •  Difficulty  with  tradi5onal  hierarchy    
  7. 7. How  are  they  different?    •  Compared  to  other  generaCons,  Millennials  are  the  most:   •  Educated   •  Underemployed   •  Op5mis5c   •  Plugged-­‐in   •  Nonreligious   •  Democra5c   •  Diverse    •  How  they  stack  up  against  GeneraCon  X  and  Baby  Boomers?   •  Meaningful  work  as  “workplace  reward”  (vs.  freedom  or  5tle)   •  Had  helicopter  parents  (vs.  distant  or  controlling)   •  Crave  community  (vs.  independence  or  aQack  oppression)  
  8. 8. Genera5on  Y  is  connected  and  social  41%  of  Millennials  have  made  a   33%  of  Millennials  more  likely  purchase  using  their  smartphone   to  buy  product  if  it  has  a  (Edelman  Digital)   Facebook  page  compared  to   17%  of  non-­‐Millennials  74%  of  Millennials  believe  that    (Boston  Consul5ng  Group)  technology  makes  life  easier    (Pew  Research)   43%  of  18-­‐24  year-­‐olds  say  that   tex5ng  is  just  as  meaningful  as  50  =  median  number  of  text   an  actual  conversa5on  with  messages  Millennials  send  every   someone  over  the  phone  day  (Pew  Research)   (eMarketer)  
  9. 9. Why  should  organiza5ons  care?  •  Millennials  represent  the  single  largest  genera5on  in  human   history      •  There  are  more  Millennials  in  the  U.S  than  any  other  age  group    •  Millennials  will  have  the  largest  buying  power  in  the  United   States  by  2017    •  Millennials  represent  the  first-­‐ever  genera5on  that  will  run  our   country  for  at  least  40  years  straight    •  Aner  2016,  Millennials  will  largely  determine  the  outcomes  of   the  following  six  presiden5al  elec5ons  and  the  public  policy   priori5es  that  will  affect  museums    
  10. 10. 2.  We’ve  all  gone  social…  online    (and  museums  have,  too)  
  11. 11. Your  audience  is  online   •  Social  media  accounts  for  nearly  1  /4  of   total  5me  spent  on  the  Internet   •  40%  access  through  mobile  phones   •  Nearly  4/5  web  users  visit  social  media   sites/blogs   •   Facebook  has  1  billion  users,  600   million  mobile  users,  42  million  pages,   9  million  apps   •  It’s  not  just  young  people.  26%  of  web   users  age  65+  use  social  media  sites   •  70%  ac5ve  online  adults  that  use  social   network  sites  shop  online,  12%  more  likely   to  buy    than  the  average  adult  Internet   user  *  Sources:  Neilsen  Social  Media  Report.  Q3  2011,    Facebook,  Inc.  Amendment  No.  4  to  Form  S-­‐1  Registra5on  Statement  
  12. 12. What  influences  the  visita5on  decision-­‐making  process?    Discre5onary  decision-­‐making  u5lity  model    
  13. 13. Diffusion  of  Messaging    “Q”  -­‐  the  coefficient  of  imita5on  -­‐  has  a  value  12.85x  greater  than  that  of  “P”-­‐  the  coefficient  of  innova5on.  This  is  cri5cally  important  to  understand  as  there  is  no  amount  of  adver5sing  or  other  forms  of  “P”  that  will  overcome  a  deficiency  of  earned  media  (i.e.-­‐  “Q”)  
  14. 14. Public  sources  of  informa5on   Reach:  Via  what  channels  do  people  acquire  informa7on?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   495.9   500   443.2   403.5   400  INDEX   287.6  V 300  ALU 233.8  237.0  E   200   179.6   157.2   148.7   120.6   108.4   111.6   109.6  109.1   100   76.2   71.3   74.3   69.6   54.5   50.3   12.3   9.4   9.8   9.5   8.7   8.8   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  15. 15. Public  sources  of  informa5on   Trust:  How  credible  are  the  respec7ve  informa7on  channels?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   500   400  INDEX   289.6  284.3  V 300  AL 245.2  242.9   243.1  244.5  UE   211.1   199.5   187.6  192.3   200   152.5   143.2   141.0  138.8   134.5   128.7   119.8   121.6   112.2   112.3   100   51.1   48.7   43.8   44.4   44.1   29.6   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  16. 16. Public  sources  of  informa5on   Amplifica7on:  What  is  the  re-­‐distribu7on  poten7al  of  the  respec7ve  informa7on  channels?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   500   400  INDEX  V 300  ALU 235.5  E   200   186.0   177.4  175.8   98.7   99.2   99.7   101.8   91.2   92.7   89.4   92.0   100   64.8   55.8   31.3   29.6   19.4   19.1   24.3   22.7   12.8   13.4   9.4   9.2   10.3   9.6   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  17. 17. Public  sources  of  informa5on   Overall  Value:  What  are  the  weighted,  rela7ve  values  of  the  respec7ve  informa7on  channels?   Jun  2011   Mar  2012   600   500   409.3   400  INDEX  V 300   274.4   282.3   269.0  269.7  ALU 239.2  E   224.6   200   146.6   114.9   101.5   100   76.5   53.9   33.8   28.7   22.5   13.0   16.2   11.6   6.3   4.8   0.6   0.2   0.2   0.2   0.2   0.1   0   Web   Social  media   WOM   Email   Mobile  web   Peer  review   Television   Radio  -­‐  satellite   Newspaper  -­‐   Periodicals  and   Direct  mail   Other  print   Other   web   and  terrestrial   print   magazines  -­‐   (miscellaneous)   print  
  18. 18. 1.  Selling  your  admission  (the  new  rules  of  an  old  game)  
  19. 19. “As  a  visitor  or  cons5tuent,  I  only  care  about  my   own  experience  with  the  museum.         Members  of  Genera5on  Y  value  public  service,   social  good,  and  connec5vity  to  a  cause  or   organiza5on.      
  20. 20. “What  is  the  primary  benefit  of  membership?”    Based  on  IMPACTS  data  for  a  large  VSO  that  supports  conserva5on    AGE  13  –  34   AGE  35+  (lexical  analysis,  top  five  by  descending  frequency)   (lexical  analysis,  top  five  by  descending  frequency)      1.  Free  Admission   1.  Free  Admission  2.  Belonging  to  the  organiza5on   2.  Priority  Access  3.  Suppor5ng  the  organiza5on   3.  Members-­‐only  func5ons  4.  Suppor5ng  conserva5on   4.  Advance  no5ce  of  upcoming  ac5vi5es  5.  Making  a  posi5ve  impact  on  the  environment   5.  Member  discounts  
  21. 21. “We  trust  nonprofits  more  than  big  companies     because  they  do  the  most  “social  good.”     We  are  increasingly  sector  agnos5c;  any  sector   can  carry  out  and  promote  social  responsibility.      Now  I  support  brands  that  align  with  my  values.      
  22. 22. Millennials  are  public  service  mo5vated    This  genera5on  will  onen  chose  social  responsibility  regardless  of  sector    89%  are  likely  or  very  likely  to  switch  from  one  brand  to  another  (price  and  quality  being  equal)  if  the  second  brand  is  associated  with  a  good  cause  66%  will  recommend   69%  consider  a  company’s  products/services  if  the   social  and  environmental  company  is  socially  responsible   commitment  when  deciding   where  to  shop  74%  of  Millennials  are  more  likely  to  pay  aQen5on  to  a   83%  of  Millennials  will  trust  a  company’s  messages  if  the   company  more  if  it  is  socially/company  has  a  deep   environmentally  responsible  commitment  to  a  cause   Source:  Cone  Millennial  Case  Study  
  23. 23. “I  am  a  member  of  the  service  economy”    I  am  a  member  of  the  experience  economy  
  24. 24. Providing  “transforma5ve  experiences”  is  important    This  aligns  strongly  with  accessibility  and  strong  customer  service     Millennials  are  members  of  the  “Experience  Economy”  73%  of  Millennials  will  leave  aner  one  bad  experience;  85%  will  tell  others  about  poor  experiences  (Convergy’s  Customer  Management)    What  you  can  you  do:   Sa5sfac5on  does  not  equal  •  Create  mul5channel   loyalty   interac5ons     Millennials  want  personalized  •  Personalize  experience  by   customer  service  or  intelligent   knowing  your  audience   self-­‐service  
  25. 25. “What  I  see  at  the  museum  is  most  important”    Who  I  am  with  at  the  museum  is  most  important  
  26. 26. The  best  thing  about  a  visit  to  a  zoo,  aquarium,  or  museum  
  27. 27. Have  ques5ons,  ideas,  or  resources?   Please  contact  me!    cdilenschneider@   Know  Your  Own  Bone  impactsresearch.com   colleendilen.com   @cdilly   linkedin.com/in/   twiQer.com/cdilly   colleendilenschneider   facebook.com/colleendilen   pinterest.com/colleendilen  

×