Deaf-Blindness

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A Presentation on Deaf-Blindness

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Deaf-Blindness

  1. 1. Deaf-BlindnessBy Chelsea Ellis and Janelle Baguley
  2. 2. Helen Keller (June 27, 1880 June 1, 1968)American author, political activist, and lecturer First deaf-blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Kellers teacher, Annie Sullivan, broke through theisolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate Keller was well traveled and was outspoken in her opposition to war. She campaigned for womens suffrage, workers rights, and socialism, as well as many other progressive causes.
  3. 3. Legal Definition Simultaneous hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for children with deafness or children with blindness.
  4. 4. Stats and Facts Affects about 45,000 to 50,000 people in the U.S. Common for people to have some residual hearing and/or vision Causes:  Illness  Accident  Genetic syndrome like Usher Syndrome  Premature birth  Meningitis  Post-natal complications
  5. 5. Characteristics Auditory impairment and visual impairment with vision loss being the primary disability Auditory impairment and vision impairment with auditory impairment as the primary disability Auditory impairment and blindness; deafness, visual impairment, and deaf-blindness
  6. 6. Characteristics Cont’d Congenitally Deaf-Adventitiously Blind Congenitally Deaf-Blind Adventitiously Deaf-Blind Adventitiously Deaf-Congenitally BlindDegrees Hard of Hearing-Blind Hard of Hearing-Visually Impaired Deaf-Visually Impaired Deaf-Blind
  7. 7. Challenges Dependent on others Communication Navigating surroundings Finding social, living, and employment situations Reaction from others because of differences
  8. 8. Communication Tactile sign language Close-vision sign languageWriting notes in large print/ Braille Gestures Pictures Lip reading Touch cues Ear/assistive listening device Text file on computer disk Audio recordings
  9. 9. Education Early Intervention Services  Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities Program of IDEA (Part C)  Ages birth to 3  Services address developmental and learning needs  Ex: Baby Watch Early Intervention Program Special Education Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind (USDB)
  10. 10. Learning Strategies Talk with student (where possible) to see what resources they require. Assisted Listening Devices- Small device worn by instructor that increases volume and clarity of lecture. Interpreter Note takers Tutors Readers
  11. 11. Learning Strategies Cont’d Handouts that are converted into students preferred reading style (i.e. braille) Large Print/Braille Materials or Taped Textbooks Reading Machines Audiovisual Materials Oral tests, extended test time, reading machine, better lighting and possibly test converted to braille
  12. 12. Resources http://nichcy.org/disability/specific/deafblindness http://www.nationaldb.org/ISSelectedTopics.php?topicI D=941&topicCatID=24 http://www.hknc.org/ http://www.aadb.org/ http://wwwcms.hutchcc.edu/uploadedFiles/Student_Re sources/Disability_Services/tpshtdb.pdf http://www.nationaldb.org/NCDBProducts.php?prodID= 48
  13. 13. Additional Resources http://www.usdb.org/deafblind/default.aspx http://www.deafblindinfo.org/ http://www.utahbabywatch.org/index.htm http://www.biography.com/people/helen-keller- 9361967/

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