Getting your masters doctorate in your p js

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  • Getting your masters doctorate in your p js

    1. 1. Get Your Masters or Doctorate in Your PJs Lamar University Cynthia Cummings, Ed.D. Diane Mason, Ph.D. Kay Abernathy, Ed.D. Sheryl Abshire, Ph. D.
    2. 2. Why Online?
    3. 3. Why Online?• 6.1 million students took at least one online course in 2010 and there was an additional reported increase of 560,000 in 2011 (Allen & Seaman, 2011)• Prediction of 27.34 million higher Source: 2011 Survey of Online Learning, education students in Babson Survey research Group the United States by 2014 (Ambient Insight Research, 2009)
    4. 4. National Online Learning Facts Higher Ed• Bacow, Bowen, Guthrie, Lack, and Long (2012) reported that elearning is being offered at almost every college or university• -31percent of the students in higher education reported having taken at least one online course (Allen & Seaman, 2011). -12.8 percent will complete all of their coursework online, 18.65 million (68.2 percent) will take some online courses (Allen& Seaman, 2011)• -According to a survey of 4,523 United States higher education institutions conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group, data from 2,512 respondents revealed over 6.1 million students took at least one online course in 2010 and there was an additional reported increase of 560,000 in 2011 (Allen & Seaman, 2011).
    5. 5. National Online Learning Facts K-12 (iNACOL - 2012)• 27 states have virtual schools• 31 states including Washington, D.C. offer fully online school• Estimated 1,816,400 enrolled in online courses with 74% of the enrollments in high school• 270,000 students enrolled in fully online schools 2011-2012 up from 2,000 in 2000
    6. 6. Online Learning Demand: Students and Parents• Forty percent of all middle and high school students are interested in taking online courses – NACOL (2007)• Sixty-nine percent of parents surveyed said they would be willing to let their child take a high school course online for credit - Education Next and Harvard study (2008)
    7. 7. “...on average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face classes.”Evidence Based Practices of Online Learning, 2009
    8. 8. “Forget Harvard and think Lamar University.”
    9. 9. Online Master’s of Education students atLamar University who took the stateprincipal exam in the spring and summer of2012 averaged 10 percentage points higherthan students statewide and also scoredhigher than most campus-based studentswho have taken the same exam.
    10. 10. Results correlate well with thefindings of a June 2009 U.S.Department of Education study,entitled Evaluation of Evidence-BasedPractices in Online Learning(www.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/evidence-based-practices/finalreport.pdf)that found that students whoparticipate in part or all of theirinstruction online perform as well asor in some cases outperform studentsenrolled in the same on-campusclasses.
    11. 11. “Using the Internet to deliver coursesseems to contain great disruptivepotential. It could allow a radicaltransformation to happen in anincremental, rational way.” -ClaytonChristensen, Harvard Business SchoolDisrupting Class: How DisruptiveInnovation Will Change the Waythe World Learns predicts thatthe growth in computer-baseddelivery of education willaccelerate swiftly until, by 2019,half of all high school classes willbe taught over the Internet.
    12. 12. One University’s Response to Higher Ed Online Learning
    13. 13. M.Ed • Educational Administration • Educational Technology Leadership with Principal Certification • Teacher Leadership • Counseling and Special Populations
    14. 14. Ed.D. in Educational LeadershipConcentrations in: –Effective Schooling –Diversity/Multiculturalism –Higher Education –Technology
    15. 15. Ed.D. in Educational Leadership Course Requirements• 60 semester hours: – 21 hours core – 15 hours in selected concentration/electives – 12 hours in research – 12 hours of dissertation
    16. 16. First Hand ExperiencesEducational Leadership and Technology Graduates
    17. 17. Sign Me Up!• Graduate Programs• Admission Requirements• Lamar Application
    18. 18. Questions and AnswersLink to presentation at slideshare:http://tinyurl.com/axsygkx
    19. 19. Contact InformationSheryl Abshire, Ph.D. Cynthia Cummings, Ed.D.sheryl.abshire@lamar.edu cdcummings@lamar.eduDiane Mason, Ph.D. Kay Abernathy, Ed.D.diane.mason@lamar.edu lkayabernathy@lamar.edu

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