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A STUDY OF TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP AMONG ELEMENTARY PRINCIPALS IN ASUBURBAN TEXAS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL              DISTRICT  ...
Background of the Problem• Preparing students with the skills, knowledge and expertise they  need to function in a global ...
Problem Statements• The absence of leadership obstructed the integration  of teaching, learning, and technology.• Most pri...
Theoretical Framework• Transformational leadership• 2002 ISTE National Educational Technology  Standards for Administrator...
Research QuestionsThe following research questions were investigated in the   research process:1. What are the self-report...
Research Questions4.Is the degree to which principals value  technology leadership associated with their  training in tech...
Methodology• Inferential statistics including t-tests and one-way  ANOVA tests were used to determine if there were any  m...
Population• Elementary school principals in a suburban  Texas school district
Instrumentation• Educational Technology for Principal’s Survey  (Allen, 2003)• Using a Likert scale, respondents self-repo...
Data Collection•   IRB•   School District Permission•   Email to principals with link to Survey Monkey•   Survey Monkey
Data Analysis• Descriptive statistical methods to generate the  mean, median, standard deviations, frequencies,  and perce...
Research Question 1 FindingsWhat are the self-reported proficiency levels ofelementary public school principals’ technolog...
Research Question 2 FindingsTo what degree do the suburban Texas schooldistrict’s elementary school principals valuetechno...
Research Question 3 FindingsAre the self-reported proficiency levelsassociated with the suburban Texas district’selementar...
Research Question 4 FindingsIs the degree to which principals value technologyleadership associated with their training in...
Research Question 5 FindingsWhat are the professional development needs intechnology leadership identified by thesuburban ...
Conclusion and Implications• University principal preparation programs• Professional development in educational  technolog...
Recommendations• Revised ISTE NETS-A standards and  performance indicators be used to develop  the survey• Include element...
Contact Information• Dr. Cynthia Cummings-  cdcummings@lamar.edu• Dr. Jason Mixon - jason.mixon@lamar.edu• Dr. Kenneth You...
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A STUDY OF TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP AMONG ELEMENTARY PRINCIPALS IN A SUBURBAN TEXAS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

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A STUDY OF TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP AMONG ELEMENTARY PRINCIPALS IN A SUBURBAN TEXAS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

  1. 1. A STUDY OF TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP AMONG ELEMENTARY PRINCIPALS IN ASUBURBAN TEXAS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT Cynthia Cummings, Ed.D. Jason Mixon, Ed.D. Kenneth Young, Ph.D.
  2. 2. Background of the Problem• Preparing students with the skills, knowledge and expertise they need to function in a global society requires a school leader who is prepared to lead technological changes in their schools (McLeod, 2011)• Principals must promote, demonstrate, and evaluate the integration of teaching, learning, and technology to develop higher-level thinking and problem-solving skills for students (TSSA, 2001).• A technology leader must embrace technology to enhance their professional practice and to increase their own productivity in order to move beyond the traditional school leaders role (Bonk, 2009 & Wagner, 2008).
  3. 3. Problem Statements• The absence of leadership obstructed the integration of teaching, learning, and technology.• Most principals struggled with their role as technology leaders due to a lack of pedagogical vision, inability to guide teachers in effective technology uses, and limited experiences with meaningful uses of technology in teaching and learning.• Principals needed technology training and knowledge about technology standards, budgets, and plans in order to lead effective integration of teaching, learning, and technology in classrooms
  4. 4. Theoretical Framework• Transformational leadership• 2002 ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators (NETS-A) – Leadership and Vision – Learning and Teaching – Productivity and Professional Practice – Support, Management, and Operations – Assessment and Evaluation – Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues
  5. 5. Research QuestionsThe following research questions were investigated in the research process:1. What are the self-reported proficiency levels of a Texas suburban school district’s elementary school principals in technology leadership?2. To what degree do the Texas suburban school district’s elementary school principals value technology leadership?3. Are the self-reported proficiency levels associated with the Texas suburban district’s elementary school principals’ training in technology leadership (i.e., the number of graduate courses or in-service workshops)?
  6. 6. Research Questions4.Is the degree to which principals value technology leadership associated with their training in technology leadership (i.e., the number of graduate courses or in-service workshops)?5.What are the professional development needs in technology leadership identified by the Texas suburban school district’s elementary school principals?
  7. 7. Methodology• Inferential statistics including t-tests and one-way ANOVA tests were used to determine if there were any main effects among the key variables on the outcome variable.• A Kruskal-Wallis test, a non-parametric alternative to a one-way between-groups analysis of variance was used after a failed Levene Test of Homogeneity of Variances.• In addition, for the analysis that used the ANOVA, an omega squared (Ω2) was calculated to determine the effect size and to compare results from the replicated study.
  8. 8. Population• Elementary school principals in a suburban Texas school district
  9. 9. Instrumentation• Educational Technology for Principal’s Survey (Allen, 2003)• Using a Likert scale, respondents self-reported their proficiency level (ranging from very weak to very strong) and level of importance (ranging from very unimportant to very important) of the ISTE NETS-A performance indicators.
  10. 10. Data Collection• IRB• School District Permission• Email to principals with link to Survey Monkey• Survey Monkey
  11. 11. Data Analysis• Descriptive statistical methods to generate the mean, median, standard deviations, frequencies, and percentage of respondents for each performance indicator.• Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), paired sample t- tests, and Kruskal-Wallis Test were used to test the relationships between the outcome variables (technology leadership proficiency and degree of value of technology leadership) and the predictor variables of number of graduate courses or number of in-service workshops attended.
  12. 12. Research Question 1 FindingsWhat are the self-reported proficiency levels ofelementary public school principals’ technologyleadership in a Texas School District?• Productivity and Professional Practice- ranked 1st• Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues and Assessment and Evaluation- ranked lowest
  13. 13. Research Question 2 FindingsTo what degree do the suburban Texas schooldistrict’s elementary school principals valuetechnology leadership?• Leadership and Vision – most important• Social, Legal and Ethical Issues- least important
  14. 14. Research Question 3 FindingsAre the self-reported proficiency levelsassociated with the suburban Texas district’selementary school principals’ training intechnology leadership (i.e., the number ofgraduate courses or in-service workshops)?• significant difference in self-reported proficiency and graduate technology courses• no significant difference between in-service workshops and self-reported proficiency
  15. 15. Research Question 4 FindingsIs the degree to which principals value technologyleadership associated with their training in technologyleadership (i.e., the number of graduate courses or inservice workshops)?• No significant difference between graduate courses or in-service and the value of technology
  16. 16. Research Question 5 FindingsWhat are the professional development needs intechnology leadership identified by thesuburban Texas school district’s elementaryschool principals?• paired-sample t-test revealed significant differences between Importance and Actual Proficiency ratings on all six areas of the standard, indicating a need for further training in all six areas of the NETS-A.
  17. 17. Conclusion and Implications• University principal preparation programs• Professional development in educational technology leadership• State certification programs
  18. 18. Recommendations• Revised ISTE NETS-A standards and performance indicators be used to develop the survey• Include elementary and secondary principals• A mixed-method design be used.• Use demographic information such as gender, race, and years of administrative experience as an predictor variable
  19. 19. Contact Information• Dr. Cynthia Cummings- cdcummings@lamar.edu• Dr. Jason Mixon - jason.mixon@lamar.edu• Dr. Kenneth Young – ken.young@lamar.eduPresentation URLhttp://tinyurl.com/9pbog9j

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