Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
October 17–19, 2013

VIEWS AND VOICES!
Men and Women Leaders Debate the Top 10 Issues and Advantages for
Women in Stem
• As a rule, women tend to gravitate to fields such as
education, English, psychology, biol-ogy, and art history,
while me...
• We define conflict as a disagreement
through which the parties involved
perceive a threat to their needs,
interests or c...
Disagreement • Generally, we are aware there is some level of difference
in the positions of the two (or more) parties inv...
Parties involved
• There are often disparities in our sense of who is involved in
the conflict. Sometimes, people are surp...
Perceived threat
• People respond to the perceived threat, rather than the
true threat, facing them. Thus, while perceptio...
Needs, interests or concerns
• There is a tendency to narrowly define "the
problem" as one of substance, task, and
near-te...
• Participants in conflicts tend to respond on the
basis of their perceptions of the situation, rather
than an objective r...
• Women have the ability and drive to succeed in science
and engineering.
• Women are very likely to face discrimination i...
Commonly-Held beliefs about women
Belief

Evidence

• Women are not as good in
mathematics as men.
• The matter of “ under...
Belief

Evidence

• Women and minorities are
recipients of favoritism through
affirmative-action programs.
• Academe is a ...
Belief

Evidence

• Changing the rules means that
standards of excellence will be
deleteriously affected
• Women faculty a...
Belief

• Women faculty are less
productive than men

Evidence
• The critical factor
affecting publication
productivity is...
Belief
• Women are more
interested in family than
in careers

Evidence
• Women persist in their
pursuit of academic
career...
Belief
• Women take more time
off due to their
childbearing, so they are
bad investment

Evidence
• On average women take
...
The role of managers
• In identifying, preventing and resolving
conflict between women in the workplace
requires that mana...
Step 1. Develop women’s skills to name and
negotiate friendship expectations
• Women’s friendship expectations are and una...
Step 2. Develop women’s skills to negotiate
role boundaries
• Women need skills for negotiating roleboundaries when they a...
Step 3. Develop skills for direct
communication
• There are times when direct
communication skills, such as: (a) giving,
r...
Alexander Evans © ™
Principal
4Mankind LLC
Alexander.evans@4mankind.net
www.4mankind.net
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Views and Voices! Men and Women Leaders Debate the Top 10 Issues and Advantages for Women in STEM

827 views

Published on

Come listen to diverse views and voices as college students, new professionals, and executives take a stand on important issues. Do you think you have heard all of the challenges for women? As we continue to think about racial and gender equality, equal pay, and leadership discrimination, there are new opportunities and obstacles emerging. How are perceptions of women changing? Why are there still so few women leaders in top positions? How can we leverage new opportunities and close gender gaps? Join us for a lively discussion about issues and advantages as we enter into a new and changing era for women.
Learning Objective- This workshop will help you understand the business impact of behavior, attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs.
Outcome-At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
a. Engage in a candid dialogue regarding the perceived challenges of managing/leading women and being managed/led by women
b. Discuss tools and techniques to find, build, and restore critical professional relationships
c. Explore issues of race, gender, and perceptions in pay and promotional opportunities

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Views and Voices! Men and Women Leaders Debate the Top 10 Issues and Advantages for Women in STEM

  1. 1. October 17–19, 2013 VIEWS AND VOICES! Men and Women Leaders Debate the Top 10 Issues and Advantages for Women in Stem
  2. 2. • As a rule, women tend to gravitate to fields such as education, English, psychology, biol-ogy, and art history, while men are much more numerous in physics, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Why this is so is an interesting question—and the subject of a sub-stantial empirical literature. The research on gender and vocation is complex, vibrant, and full of reasonable disagreements; there is no single, simple answer.
  3. 3. • We define conflict as a disagreement through which the parties involved perceive a threat to their needs, interests or concerns. Within this simple definition there are several important understandings that emerge:
  4. 4. Disagreement • Generally, we are aware there is some level of difference in the positions of the two (or more) parties involved in the conflict. But the true disagreement versus the perceived disagreement may be quite different from one another. • In fact, conflict tends to be accompanied by significant levels of misunderstanding that exaggerate the perceived disagreement considerably. • If we can understand the true areas of disagreement, this will help us solve the right problems and manage the true needs of the parties.
  5. 5. Parties involved • There are often disparities in our sense of who is involved in the conflict. Sometimes, people are surprised to learn they are a party to the conflict, while other times we are shocked to learn we are not included in the disagreement. • On many occasions, people who are seen as part of the social system (e.g., work team, family, company) are influenced to participate in the dispute, whether they would personally define the situation in that way or not. • In the above example, people very readily "take sides" based upon current perceptions of the issues, past issues and relationships, roles within the organization, and other factors. The parties involved can become an elusive concept to define.
  6. 6. Perceived threat • People respond to the perceived threat, rather than the true threat, facing them. Thus, while perception doesn't become reality per se, people's behaviors, feelings and ongoing responses become modified by that evolving sense of the threat they confront. • If we can work to understand the true threat (issues) and develop strategies (solutions) that manage it (agreement), we are acting constructively to manage the conflict
  7. 7. Needs, interests or concerns • There is a tendency to narrowly define "the problem" as one of substance, task, and near-term viability. However, workplace conflicts tend to be far more complex than that, for they involve ongoing relationships with complex, emotional components.
  8. 8. • Participants in conflicts tend to respond on the basis of their perceptions of the situation, rather than an objective review of it. • As such, people filter their perceptions (and reactions) through their values, culture, beliefs, information, experience, gender, and other variables. • Conflict responses are both filled with ideas and feelings that can be very strong and powerful guides to our sense of possible solutions.
  9. 9. • Women have the ability and drive to succeed in science and engineering. • Women are very likely to face discrimination in every field of science and engineering
  10. 10. Commonly-Held beliefs about women Belief Evidence • Women are not as good in mathematics as men. • The matter of “ underrepresentation” on faculties is only a matter of time. • Women are not as competitive as men, women don’t want jobs in academe. • • • Female performance in high school mathematics now matches that of males. Women’s representation decreases with each step up the tenure-track and academic leadership hierarchy, even in fields that have had a large proportion of women doctorates for 30years. Similar proportions of men and women science and engineering doctorates plan to enter postdoctoral study or academic
  11. 11. Belief Evidence • Women and minorities are recipients of favoritism through affirmative-action programs. • Academe is a meritocracy • AA is meant to broaden searches to include more women & minority-group members, but not select candidates on the basis of race or sex, which is illegal. • Although scientists like to believe that they ―choose the best‖ base on objective criteria, decision are influenced by factors
  12. 12. Belief Evidence • Changing the rules means that standards of excellence will be deleteriously affected • Women faculty are less productive than men • This process does not optimally select and advance the best scientists and engineers, because of implicit bias and disproportionate weighting of qualities that are stereotypically male. Reducing these sources of bias will foster excellence in science and engineering fields. •
  13. 13. Belief • Women faculty are less productive than men Evidence • The critical factor affecting publication productivity is access to institutional resources; marriage, children, and eldercare responsibilities have minimal effects
  14. 14. Belief • Women are more interested in family than in careers Evidence • Women persist in their pursuit of academic career despite severe conflict between their role as parents and as scientists & engineers. These efforts, however aren’t recognized as high level of dedication to their careers they represent.
  15. 15. Belief • Women take more time off due to their childbearing, so they are bad investment Evidence • On average women take more time off during their early careers to meet their care giving responsibilities, which fall disproportionately to women. • However they make it up throughout the course of their career .
  16. 16. The role of managers • In identifying, preventing and resolving conflict between women in the workplace requires that managers learn how women’s friendship culture can add value to an organization, as well as create confusion for women in the context of the hierarchical organization. • Organizations in the 21st century understand that it is not effective to manage women by expecting women to behave like men.
  17. 17. Step 1. Develop women’s skills to name and negotiate friendship expectations • Women’s friendship expectations are and unacknowledged and often unknown template underlying their workplace relationships. Women can benefit from learning to identify, describe and negotiate their friendship rules, or expectations, with other women in the workplace. • Because friendship rules are primarily developed in childhood and are deeply embedded in the unconscious, it is difficult to name them. Learning to name them and mastering skills to negotiate and modify these expectations can prevent conflicts. Both women and men have friendship rules, or expectations, but they are different because of gender socialization. • Pre-publication copy for article in Strategic HR Review, Vol. 9, Number 1, 2010 by Anne H. Litwin PhD
  18. 18. Step 2. Develop women’s skills to negotiate role boundaries • Women need skills for negotiating roleboundaries when they are the boss, as well as in peer relationships and when reporting to women bosses. Negotiation skills will enable them to be explicit about whether they are wearing the hat of “friend,” “teammate” or “boss” during interactions where expectations from each other may need to vary.
  19. 19. Step 3. Develop skills for direct communication • There are times when direct communication skills, such as: (a) giving, receiving and inviting feedback; and (b) describing feelings, are necessary to strengthen and maintain work relationships. Many women are not comfortable with direct communication.
  20. 20. Alexander Evans © ™ Principal 4Mankind LLC Alexander.evans@4mankind.net www.4mankind.net

×