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The Future is Here: How Will the Digital Age Change My Career?

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Workplace automation, cloud computing, robotics, data analytics, digital transformation, etc. have entered the mainstream workforce and will continue to expand in adoption and practice. The questions many are struggling to understand center on the impact of these innovations on the current and future careers of our professional knowledge workers.

Will there be viable employment opportunities for STEM and other professionals’ if machines are utilized to provide more cognitive roles in society? Will the number of available jobs and careers decrease as a result of more machine dependency? How can the human workforce and machines coexist?

This seminar will address the growing trend of machine dependency and its impact on the professional global workforce. We will explore the current state of digital transformation and address the tougher questions involving future career opportunities and professional development strategies in the machine age. We will discuss the future outlook for the knowledge workforce and provide insights on how to prepare and take advantage of this age of digital transformation.

At the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

a. The future impacts of digital transformation in the professional workplace
b. How to embrace the digital age of disruption and find professional opportunities for advancement
c. The current professional employment gaps and how to transition into a digital savvy professional
d. How to embrace artificial intelligence in the professional work environment
e. How to plan my professional development path to take advantage of digital transformation

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The Future is Here: How Will the Digital Age Change My Career?

  1. 1. The Future is Here How Will the Digital Age Change My Career? Seminar 2430 Presenter: Jem Pagán
  2. 2. About the Speaker • Member of the NY CTO Club • Member of the Boston CTO Club • Member of the Wall Street Technology Association • Member of the Cloud Standards Customer Council • Member of the Cyber Security Alliance • Board member & Advisor • Business and & Technology Trusted Advisor • Guitar player and avid reader
  3. 3. Seminar participants will explore: 1.What the digital era and its impact on the U.S. workforce 2.How STEM professionals can leverage the digital age to drive sustained career growth and value 3.The winning mindset of a STEM professional in the digital era Seminar Overview
  4. 4. Forecast: 20 Billion IoT Devices by 2020
  5. 5. Market Drivers for the Digital Era • The need for subject matter experts in all fields • The need for insights in systems, processes, behaviors and outcomes • The need for physical and digital security of information, systems, infrastructures and identities • The need for faster delivery of innovation • The need for increased competitive advantage and market differentiation
  6. 6. STEM Employment – Future Growth hief Economist July 2011 ESA Issue Brief #03-11 counterparts. Science, technology, engineer- ing and mathematics workers play a key role in the sustained growth and stability of the U.S. economy, and are a critical component to helping the U.S. win the future. 7.9% 17.0% 2.6% 9.8% 0% 3% 6% 9% 12% 15% 18% 2000-10 growth 2008-18 projected growth STEM employment Non-STEM employment Source: ESA calculations using Current Population Survey public-use microdata and estimates from the Employment Projections Program of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Figure 1. Recent and Projected Growth in STEM and Non-STEM Employment Source: ESA calculations using Current Population Survey public-use microdata and estimates from the Employ- ment Projections Program of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Figure 1. Recent and Projected Growth in STEM and Non-STEM Employment More than two-thirds of STEM workers have at least a college degree, compared to less than one-third of non-STEM workers. STEM degree holders enjoy higher earnings, regardless of whether they work in STEM or non-STEM occupations.
  7. 7. Occupation Job openings, projected 2012–22 Employment Median annual wage, May 2013 Typical entry-level education1 2012 Projected 2022 Software developers, applications 218,500 613,000 752,900 $92,660 Bachelor’s degree Computer systems analysts 209,600 520,600 648,400 81,190 Bachelor’s degree Computer user support specialists2 196,900 547,700 658,500 46,620 Some college, no degree Software developers, systems software 134,700 405,000 487,800 101,410 Bachelor’s degree Civil engineers 120,100 272,900 326,600 80,770 Bachelor’s degree Computer programmers 118,100 343,700 372,100 76,140 Bachelor’s degree Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, technical and scientific products2 111,800 382,300 419,500 74,520 Bachelor’s degree Network and computer systems administrators 100,500 366,400 409,400 74,000 Bachelor’s degree Mechanical engineers 99,700 258,100 269,700 82,100 Bachelor’s degree Computer and information systems managers3 97,100 332,700 383,600 123,950 Bachelor’s degree Industrial engineers 75,400 223,300 233,400 80,300 Bachelor’s degree Architectural and engineering managers3 60,600 193,800 206,900 128,170 Bachelor’s degree Web developers 50,700 141,400 169,900 63,160 Associate’s degree Electrical engineers 44,100 166,100 174,000 89,180 Bachelor’s degree Computer network architects3 43,500 143,400 164,300 95,380 Bachelor’s degree 1 Unless otherwise specified, occupations typically require neither work experience in a related occupation nor on-the-job training to obtain competency. 2 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires moderate-term on-the-job training for workers to obtain competency. 3 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires 5 years or more of work experience in a related occupation. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program (employment, projections, and education data) and Table 2: Selected STEM occupations with many job openings, projected 2012–22 6 Occupational Outlook Quarterly • Spring 2014 • www.bls.gov/ooq career options. openings between 2012 and 2022. Occupation Job openings, projected 2012–22 Employment Median annual wage, May 2013 Typical entry-level education1 2012 Projected 2022 Software developers, applications 218,500 613,000 752,900 $92,660 Bachelor’s degree Computer systems analysts 209,600 520,600 648,400 81,190 Bachelor’s degree Computer user support specialists2 196,900 547,700 658,500 46,620 Some college, no degree Software developers, systems software 134,700 405,000 487,800 101,410 Bachelor’s degree Civil engineers 120,100 272,900 326,600 80,770 Bachelor’s degree Computer programmers 118,100 343,700 372,100 76,140 Bachelor’s degree Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, technical and scientific products2 111,800 382,300 419,500 74,520 Bachelor’s degree Network and computer systems administrators 100,500 366,400 409,400 74,000 Bachelor’s degree Mechanical engineers 99,700 258,100 269,700 82,100 Bachelor’s degree Computer and information systems managers3 97,100 332,700 383,600 123,950 Bachelor’s degree Industrial engineers 75,400 223,300 233,400 80,300 Bachelor’s degree Architectural and engineering managers3 60,600 193,800 206,900 128,170 Bachelor’s degree Web developers 50,700 141,400 169,900 63,160 Associate’s degree Electrical engineers 44,100 166,100 174,000 89,180 Bachelor’s degree Computer network architects3 43,500 143,400 164,300 95,380 Bachelor’s degree 1 Unless otherwise specified, occupations typically require neither work experience in a related occupation nor on-the-job training to obtain competency. 2 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires moderate-term on-the-job training for workers to obtain competency. 3 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires 5 years or more of work experience in a related occupation. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program (employment, projections, and education data) and Occupational Employment Statistics survey (wage data). Table 2: Selected STEM occupations with many job openings, projected 2012–22 Source: Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections - BLS
  8. 8. Occupation Employment growth, projected 2012–22 (percent) Employment Median annual wage, May 2013 Typical entry-level education1 2012 Projected 2022 Information security analysts2 37% 75,100 102,500 $88,590 Bachelor’s degree Operations research analysts 27 73,200 92,700 74,630 Bachelor’s degree Statisticians 27 27,600 34,900 79,290 Master’s degree Biomedical engineers 27 19,400 24,600 88,670 Bachelor’s degree Actuaries3 26 24,300 30,600 94,340 Bachelor’s degree Petroleum engineers 26 38,500 48,400 132,320 Bachelor’s degree Computer systems analysts 25 520,600 648,400 81,190 Bachelor’s degree Software developers, applications 23 613,000 752,900 92,660 Bachelor’s degree Mathematicians 23 3,500 4,300 102,440 Master’s degree Software developers, systems software 20 405,000 487,800 101,410 Bachelor’s degree Computer user support specialists4 20 547,700 658,500 46,620 Some college, no degree Web developers 20 141,400 169,900 63,160 Associate’s degree Civil engineers 20 272,900 326,600 80,770 Bachelor’s degree Biological science teachers, postsecondary 20 61,400 73,400 75,740 Doctoral or professional degree Environmental science and protection technicians, including health 19 32,800 38,900 41,700 Associate’s degree 1 Unless otherwise specified, occupations typically require neither work experience in a related occupation nor on-the-job training to obtain competency. 2 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires less than 5 years of work experience in a related occupation. 3 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires long-term on-the-job training for workers to obtain competency. 4 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires moderate-term on-the-job training for workers Table 3: Selected STEM occupations with fast employment growth, projected 2012–22 Source: Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections - BLS 7 Occupational Outlook Quarterly • Spring 2014 • www.bls.gov/ooq occupations, such as biomedical engineers and BLS data show that workers in the STEM occupations discussed in this article earned a Occupation Employment growth, projected 2012–22 (percent) Employment Median annual wage, May 2013 Typical entry-level education1 2012 Projected 2022 Information security analysts2 37% 75,100 102,500 $88,590 Bachelor’s degree Operations research analysts 27 73,200 92,700 74,630 Bachelor’s degree Statisticians 27 27,600 34,900 79,290 Master’s degree Biomedical engineers 27 19,400 24,600 88,670 Bachelor’s degree Actuaries3 26 24,300 30,600 94,340 Bachelor’s degree Petroleum engineers 26 38,500 48,400 132,320 Bachelor’s degree Computer systems analysts 25 520,600 648,400 81,190 Bachelor’s degree Software developers, applications 23 613,000 752,900 92,660 Bachelor’s degree Mathematicians 23 3,500 4,300 102,440 Master’s degree Software developers, systems software 20 405,000 487,800 101,410 Bachelor’s degree Computer user support specialists4 20 547,700 658,500 46,620 Some college, no degree Web developers 20 141,400 169,900 63,160 Associate’s degree Civil engineers 20 272,900 326,600 80,770 Bachelor’s degree Biological science teachers, postsecondary 20 61,400 73,400 75,740 Doctoral or professional degree Environmental science and protection technicians, including health 19 32,800 38,900 41,700 Associate’s degree 1 Unless otherwise specified, occupations typically require neither work experience in a related occupation nor on-the-job training to obtain competency. 2 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires less than 5 years of work experience in a related occupation. 3 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires long-term on-the-job training for workers to obtain competency. 4 In addition to the education specified, this occupation typically requires moderate-term on-the-job training for workers to obtain competency. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program (employment, projections, and education data) and Occupational Employment Statistics survey (wage data). Table 3: Selected STEM occupations with fast employment growth, projected 2012–22
  9. 9. Discussion Time • What worries us about the digital era? • What excites us about the digital era? • Where can the digital era take us? • Industrial Age / Digital Age – What’s the difference? • Where are we on the digital continuum? • The World is flat!
  10. 10. ”other” Insights Consider • Gamification (humanize business processes) • Continuous learning (engage in activities that are not career related) • Self-disruption (embrace change before it turns into disruption) • My employer is my customer (intrapreneur) • Transition away from the resume to achievements (our experience captured as media) • Create a real-time feedback loop to foster your career goals and objectives (trusted advisor)
  11. 11. Practice Emotional Fitness • Be self-aware • Take responsibility • Contemplate your choices • Practice makes perfect • Be patient • Be an optimistic realist Source: Sherrie Campbell - Psychologist, Author, Speaker
  12. 12. SWAT + STEM = SUCCESS Focus on being a High Performance Professional S (Stable), W (Winners), A (Attentive to details), T (Team-oriented) • Stable – Practice and develop consistently positive behavior • Winner – Be ”That Person” who is cray enough to believe the impossible can actually be achieved • Attentive – Think of the world and all its experiences as a playground for learning and exploration • Team-oriented – Understand the wealth of leveraging your diversity for the good of the team
  13. 13. Jem Pagan - LinkedIn Jem Pagán jem@bluskyconsulting.com http://bluskyconsulting.com/ @bluskyconsulting

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