Open Data and Reuse of Public
Sector Information
UK PSI and Open Data Developments

Prime Minister’s
commitments on
transparency and open data

• Open Data Strategies – De...
Global Developments in PSI
Open Government Partnership
Principle:
Transparency
Commitment: Information and data access,
di...
Open Data and the PSI Directive
Open Data Charter
• Principle 1: Open Data by Default
• Principle 2: Quality and Quantity
...
PSI Directive 2013
Main features
• Mandatory re-use
 requires public sector bodies (PSBs) to allow the re-use of generall...
PSI Directive 2013 and archives
Implications
• Scope and exemptions
 Museums, libraries and archives in the public sector...
Open Data, PSI and archives

Image: velvetkevorkian
(Source: Flickr)

• New stories and insights into history can be uncov...
Jim Wretham
Head of Information Policy
The National Archives

jim.wretham@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk
8
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Open Data and Re-use of Public Sector Information (PSI)

689 views

Published on

Internet Governance of Open Government Data
Workshop 303

Internet Governance Forum

22 October 2013
Bali, Indonesia

Jim Wretham
Head of Information Policy
The National Archives
United Kingdom

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
689
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Open Government PartnershipAs current G8 president and lead co-chair of the international Open Government Partnership, the UK is promoting transparency and open data on the global stage as a means to fight corruption and drive prosperity.Transparency is also at the heart of the UK government’s reforming agenda.OGP Summit is being held in London at the end of October 2013 (31 October – 1 November 2013) – Open data is a significant element in work of the OGP 2013 – UK Presidency of G8G8 Summit – 17-18 June 2013 – Leaders from Canada, France, Germany Italy, Russia, USA and the UK met at Lough Erne in Northern Ireland. PM David Cameron is determined to achieve change on three issues: advancing trade; ensuring tax compliance; and promoting greater transparency. G8 leaders signed the Open Data Charter at the summit, putting open data firmly at the forefront of international efforts to drive economic growth and to improve accountability through transparency.
  • The Open Data Charter sets out 5 strategic principles that all G8 members will act on.These include an expectation that all government data will be published open by default, alongside principles to increase the quality, quantity and re-use of the data that is released. G8 members have also identified 14 high-value areas from which they will release data – from education to transport, and from health to crime and justice. These will help unlock the economic potential of open data, support innovation and provide greater accountability. Directive 2013/37/EU amending Directive 2003/98/EC on the re-use of public sector information – adopted on 26 June 2013 (after a year and a half of negotiations to achieve a workable solution in all Member States). Member States need to have national legislation in place by July 2015.
  • The 2013 Directive updates European legislation. It aims to enable more economic and social opportunities by opening up public sector information for re-use.
  • Implications for museums, archives and librariesDocuments held by museums, libraries (including university libraries) and archives in the public sector are within scope. Information which remains excluded from scope: information subject to third party intellectual property rights, information which would not be accessible under access regimes (such as information relating to national security) and personal data. The Directive incorporates a framework for museums, libraries and archives (including university libraries) to release as much cultural material for re-use as possible without imposing unnecessary burdens. Non-mandatory - Where museums, libraries and archives make information available for re-use, it should be reusable for commercial and non-commercial purposes and subject to Directive. Charging – museums, libraries and archives are not subject to the default rule of charging at marginal cost – they are able to charge to cover the costs of collection, production, reproduction, dissemination, preservation and rights clearance of the information together with a reasonable return on investment. Exclusive arrangements - some flexibility is permitted, on a time limited basis, for exclusive arrangements when allowing re-use, especially where the museum, archive or library is working with a partner on a digitisation project.
  • The UK National Archives online catalogue, Discovery, has an API (application programming interface) which provides a vast resource for developers, academics and enthusiasts to re-use our data in new ways. An example of re-use is in the visualisation in the centre of the slide here, which shows the volumes of naturalisation into Great Britain from each country by year. The spike in red on the graph shows the impact an event like the Chinese cultural revolution has on the increase in Chinese naturalisations. (This data comes from our Home Office records (series HO 334) – certificates of naturalisation, declarations of British nationality and declarations of alienage.)One developer used data relating to company records (including companies' names and years of incorporation) from 1860-1930 to look for trends and unusual events and behaviours.
  • Open Data and Re-use of Public Sector Information (PSI)

    1. 1. Open Data and Reuse of Public Sector Information
    2. 2. UK PSI and Open Data Developments Prime Minister’s commitments on transparency and open data • Open Data Strategies – Departments • Review of PSI – Stephan Shakespeare • Data.gov.uk UK Government Licensing Framework and Open Government Licence • Transparency Board and Panels
    3. 3. Global Developments in PSI Open Government Partnership Principle: Transparency Commitment: Information and data access, disclosure, publishing and re-use • OGP Summit – 31 October – 1 November 2013 G8 • G8 Summit – 17-18 June 2013 • Open Data Charther signed 3 http://www.opengovpartnership.org/ http://vimeo.com/29259763
    4. 4. Open Data and the PSI Directive Open Data Charter • Principle 1: Open Data by Default • Principle 2: Quality and Quantity • Principle 3: Usable by All • Principle 4: Releasing Data for Improved Governance • Principle 5: Releasign Data for Innovation • Technical annex PSI Directive 2013 Directive 2013/37/EU amending Directive 2003/98/EC on the re-use of public sector information 4
    5. 5. PSI Directive 2013 Main features • Mandatory re-use  requires public sector bodies (PSBs) to allow the re-use of generally accessible information they create, collect or hold. • Extension of scope  to cover PSI held by public sector museums, libraries (including university libraries) and archives • Marginal cost pricing  general principle that charges for re-use should be set at marginal cost, with certain exceptions • Redress mechanism  complaints by re-users to an impartial review body with the power to make binding decisions 5
    6. 6. PSI Directive 2013 and archives Implications • Scope and exemptions  Museums, libraries and archives in the public sector  Out of scope – third party rights, personal information • Charging  Costs of collection, production, reproduction, dissemination, preservation and rights clearance, together with a reasonable return on investment • Exclusive arrangements  Some flexibility, especially for partnerships on a digitisation project ___________________________ A framework to bring museums, libraries and archives (including university libraries) within scope to release as much cultural material for re-use as possible without imposing unnecessary burdens.
    7. 7. Open Data, PSI and archives Image: velvetkevorkian (Source: Flickr) • New stories and insights into history can be uncovered when new skills and technologies are used 7
    8. 8. Jim Wretham Head of Information Policy The National Archives jim.wretham@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk 8

    ×