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The Teenage Brain, Drinking & Risky Behavior Part 2 - South Windsor

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These are the slides that accompanied a presentation delivered in South Windsor, CT on January 29, 2010. The audio portion or podcast will be added to this presentation and will be available as a Slidecast at Slideshare. You can also listen to the audio at http://www.archive.org/details/AlcoholTheTeenageBrainRiskyBehavior-Part2
Contact the presenter at brown.christopher@ymail.com

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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The Teenage Brain, Drinking & Risky Behavior Part 2 - South Windsor

  1. 1. Why Parents Are More Important Than Ever <ul><li>We know they have the most influence </li></ul><ul><li>Parents Do Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Peer network is not strong </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unreliable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can change in a moment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Media bombards and influences teens </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Movies, commercials, videos, etc. </li></ul></ul>
  2. 2. Parents Do Matter <ul><li>Middle school students who believe underage drinking is acceptable to their parents were… </li></ul>FIVE times more likely to have drunk alcohol in the previous 30 days
  3. 3. Parents Do Matter <ul><li>Ninth grade students who believe underage drinking is acceptable to their parents were… </li></ul>nearly THREE times more likely to have drunk alcohol in the previous 30 days
  4. 4. U.S. Surgeon General Call To Action - 2007
  5. 5. U.S. Surgeon General Call To Action - 2007 <ul><li>Alcohol is the most widely used substance of abuse among America’s youth. A higher percentage of young people between the ages of 12 and 20 use alcohol than use tobacco or illicit drugs. The physical consequences of underage alcohol use range from medical problems to death by alcohol poisoning, and alcohol plays a significant role in risky sexual behavior, physical and sexual assaults, various types of injuries, and suicide. Underage drinking also creates secondhand effects for others, drinkers and nondrinkers alike, including car crashes from drunk driving, that put every child at risk. </li></ul>
  6. 6. U.S. Surgeon General Call To Action - 2007 <ul><li>I have issued this … to focus national attention on this enduring problem and on new, disturbing research which indicates that the developing adolescent brain may be particularly susceptible to long-term negative consequences from alcohol use. Recent studies show that alcohol consumption has the potential to trigger long-term biological changes that may have detrimental effects on the developing adolescent brain, including neuro-cognitive impairment. </li></ul>
  7. 7. CT Suburban Youth Survey Data Funding from CT DMHAS
  8. 8. South Windsor Data – May 2008 Past Month Alcohol Use
  9. 9. South Windsor Data – May 2008 Past Month Binge Drinking
  10. 10. Clinton Data – October 2008 Search Institute Survey
  11. 11. Clinton Data – October 2008 Search Institute Survey Students in Grades 9 to 12
  12. 12. Clinton Data – October 2008 Search Institute Survey I had at least one drink in past 30 days
  13. 13. Clinton Data – October 2008 Search Institute Survey Got drunk once or more in past 2 weeks
  14. 14. Clinton Data – October 2008 Search Institute Survey
  15. 15. CONSEQUENCES OF UNDERAGE DRINKING Reducing Risk & Increasing Protection
  16. 16. Recent News Stories Andover, MA – Feb. 2009
  17. 17. Madison , CT January 20, 2010
  18. 18. CT News Headlines <ul><li>Simsbury, CT </li></ul><ul><li>Milford, CT </li></ul><ul><li>Wolcott, CT </li></ul>
  19. 19. Remaining Safe <ul><li>Changing times require that we change </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Know the current risks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Working together to manage risks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduces stress & increases strength </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mastery </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal skills to manage risk </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Current Risks of Underage Drinking <ul><li>Most visible </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto accidents </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Less Visible Risks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unintentional injury </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fighting and violence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unplanned/Unprotected sex </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased chance of addiction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alcohol poisoning </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Video – Unintentional Injury – Warren 17y.o.
  22. 22. Unintentional Injury Hingson, R., et al. JAMA. 2000;284:1527-1533
  23. 23. Unintentional Injury Hingson, R., et al. JAMA. 2000;284:1527-1533
  24. 24. Violence Hingson, R., et al. Pediatrics. 2001;108;872-877
  25. 25. Sexual Activity Hingson, R., et al. Pediatrics. 2003;111;34-41
  26. 26. Sexual Activity Hingson, R., et al. Pediatrics. 2003;111;34-41
  27. 27. Risk of Addiction DeWit, D., et al. Am J Psychiatry 157:745-750, May 2000
  28. 28. Risk of Addiction <ul><li>Chances of lifetime dependence decreased by 14% with each increasing year of age at onset of first use. </li></ul><ul><li>Chances of lifetime abuse decreased by 8% with each increasing year of age of onset of first use. </li></ul>Grant, BF & Dawson, DA. J. Substance Abuse 1997;9:103-10.
  29. 29. Risk of Addiction <ul><li>Half of binge-drinking male adolescents (17 to 20 y.o.) continue to engage in binge-drinking as adults (30 to 31 y.o.). </li></ul><ul><li>One third of binge-drinking female adolescents continue to engage in binge-drinking as adults. </li></ul>McCarthy, et al. Pediatrics , 2004. Vol. 14, No. 3: 714-719.
  30. 30. What Happens In College? <ul><li>Myth: If a person waits until college to start drinking he'll (she'll) go over the top and have a major problem </li></ul><ul><li>Fact*: Binge drinking can either be acquired or avoided in college among students who report they did not binge drink in high school. </li></ul><ul><li>Fact**: Prior binge drinking in HS is a crucial factor in predicting binge drinking in college. </li></ul>*Weitzman, E., et al. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2003; 32;26-35. ** Wechsler, H., et al. American Journal or Public Health, 1995; 85; 921-926.
  31. 31. Associated Risks of Early Alcohol Use <ul><li>75% of teenage users of alcohol or tobacco had an opportunity to try marijuana by age 18 . </li></ul><ul><li>25% of teenage nonusers of alcohol and tobacco had an opportunity to try marijuana by age 18. </li></ul><ul><li>Teenage users of alcohol or tobacco were approximately seven times more likely than nonusers to actually use marijuana once a marijuana exposure opportunity had occurred. </li></ul>Wagner, F. & Anthony, J. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2002; Vol. 155, No. 10 : 918-925
  32. 32. Start Talking Before They Start Drinking
  33. 33. Priorities For Parents <ul><li>Remember – Can't choose for your child </li></ul><ul><li>Can set limits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make it hard to make a poor choice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Let your child blame you </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Be supportive of your child </li></ul><ul><li>Be proud of your child </li></ul>
  34. 34. Priorities For Students <ul><li>Decide what is best for you </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of the risks </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize that you are not indestructible </li></ul><ul><li>Look out for your friends </li></ul><ul><li>Respect yourself to protect yourself </li></ul>
  35. 35. Resources www.stopalcoholabuse.gov http:// pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/MakeADiff_HTML/MakeAdiff.pdf
  36. 36. Resources <ul><li>http://www.squidoo.com/stopteendrinking </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.thegordiefoundation.org/home/default.asp </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.samspadyfoundation.org/links.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/OtherAlcoholInformation/makeDifference.aspx </li></ul>
  37. 37. QUESTIONS

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