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Poetry Across Time: Character and voiceKeyLanguage: connotation, imagery, metaphor, simileStructure and form: stanzas, typ...
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Ozymandias

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Ozymandias

  1. 1. Poetry Across Time: Character and voiceKeyLanguage: connotation, imagery, metaphor, simileStructure and form: stanzas, type, patterns, contrast, juxtapositionPoetic methods: alliteration, caesura, assonance, rhythm, rhymeCharacter and voice: who is speaking and to whom? Tone of voiceLinks: comparisons to other speakers, methods and themesA mysteriousremoteness is set Another name for Ramesses the Great, Sonnet written in iambicup – an unnamed Pharaoh if ancient Egypt. He exemplified pentameter‘I’. The traveller is the ‘mighty fallen’from an ‘antiqueland’. We do not Harsh, alliterativeknow where the Ozymandias sounds – final stubborntwo met. statement?Hand may refer to the I met a traveller from an antique landsculptor, mocking the Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Poet’sKing’s ‘passions’ or Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, mocking thefacial expression. The Vanity. Half sunk, a shatter’d visage lies, whose frown‘hand’ could represent Compare with And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Keats’the authority ofOzymandias. Tell that its sculptor well those passions read ‘Grecian Urn’. Which yet survive, stamp’d on these lifeless things, ‘Cold The hand that mock’d them and the heard that fed; Pastoral’. Concise and abrupt to And on the pedestal these words appear: reflect simple ‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: finality. Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’ Nothing beside remains. Round the decay The ending confirms Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, the central–theme of the poem the The single sentence The lone and level sands stretch far away. (3-11) nonetheless transience of man. injects a burst of Rhyme scheme is energy before the unusual and the use of final demise – Ozymandias caesura and ‘Nothing…’ seems almost enjambment seem to inhuman, so break up pattern. This lacking in doubtless reflects the warmth is he – tension in the poem. statue is appropriate. Interpretations of the poem:  A symbolic representation of the arrogance of man and the behaviour of those who feel that they are immortal. The poem also serves as a reminder of how we remember those who rule through fear. The breaking down of the statue can also be seen as a symbol of natures destruction of human vanity.

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