Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The role of ‘opportunity to learn’ in the geometry currriculum

117 views

Published on

Presentation for AERA 2019.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The role of ‘opportunity to learn’ in the geometry currriculum

  1. 1. THE ROLE OF ‘OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN’ IN THE GEOMETRY CURRRICULUM A multilevel comparison of six countries AERA 2019 Christian Bokhove, University of Southampton, United Kingdom Mikio Miyazaki, Shinshu University, Japan Allen Leung, Hong Kong Baptist University Ida Mok, University of Hong Kong Kotaro Komatsu, Shinshu University, Japan Kimiho Chino, Shinshu University, Japan
  2. 2. enGasia project • England – Geometry - Asia • British Academy • 3 years International Partnership • England, Japan, Hong Kong
  3. 3. Background • International largescale assessments like PISA and TIMSS for secondary mathematics • English government looks to Asia • Focus on ‘geometry’ or ‘space and shapes’ as at face value there seem to be a lot of curriculum differences. Even larger gap. UK/ENG JAP HK KOR SGP USA PISA 2012 475 (494) 558 (536) 567 (561) 573 (554) 580 (573) 463 (481) TIMSS 2015 514 (518) 598 (586) 602 (594) 612 (606) 617 (621) 500 (518) TIMSS 2011 498 (507) 586 (570) 597 (586) 612 (613) 609 (611) 485 (509) TIMSS 2007 513 (513) 584 (570) 580 (572) 600 (597) 590 (593) 480 (508)
  4. 4. Curriculum changes For example Key Stage 3 (11-13 yr olds) “understand, from their experience of constructing them, that triangles satisfying SSS, SAS, ASA and RHS are unique, but SSA triangles are not” (DfEE, 1999, p. 38) “use the standard conventions for labelling the sides and angles of triangle ABC, and know and use the criteria for congruence of triangles” (DfE, 2013, p.8)
  5. 5. Aims of this part study Understand the role of curricular elements in mathematics and science achievement, with a particular emphasis on geometry education, at lower secondary level within and across selected countries in the East and West. 1. Align different frameworks into one framework 2. Use largescale assessment data to explore its application
  6. 6. Dynamic model • Dynamic model of educational effectiveness, as developed by Creemers and Kyriakides (2008) The first implication for our theoretical lens is that we will adopt a multilevel approach in our study.
  7. 7. Opportunity to Learn • Carroll (1963) • Schmidt and others: greater OTL in mathematics was related to higher student achievement in mathematics. • But many definitions (e.g. see Scheerens et al., 2017). • Interaction with SES We propose that we focus on variables regarding ‘opportunity to learn’ (OTL) in our study. In doing so we should include controls for SES and proxies for quality of instruction.
  8. 8. TIMSS curriculum framework • Intended • Implemented • Attained • Contrary to PISA has a curriculum focus. We use TIMSS 2011 data in this study because of its curriculum focus.
  9. 9. DOC framework Dynamic model Opportunity to learn Curriculum - TIMSS National OTL School and classroom OTL Student OTL
  10. 10. DOC framework Dynamic model Opportunity to learn Curriculum - TIMSS National level Curriculum content coverage Intended curriculum Classroom (teacher) and school • Instructional hours in the classroom • Curriculum content coverage • Curriculum content preparation • Degree and experience teacher Implemented curriculum Student Time spent on mathematics Socio-Economic Status Attained curriculum
  11. 11. Using the model: research questions I. How much of the variance in student achievement is explained by student- and classroom-level OTL curriculum factors within and across the six countries? II. How much are these OTL curriculum factors related to geometry achievement at grade eight in England, Japan, Hong Kong SAR, Korea, Singapore and the USA?
  12. 12. Secondary data analysis • TIMSS 2011 • Complex sampling design (Rutkowski et al, 2010) • Weights • Plausible Values • Multilevel models • Multilevel models in HLM 6.08.
  13. 13. Variables Dependent variables: • 5 Plausible Values for Geometry achievement Student level variables: • Home Economic Resources as proxy for SES • Weekly time for homework Classroom (teacher) level variables: • Classroom SES and Homework time • OTL measures: percentage geometry content coverage and mathematics instructional hours per week • Teacher: edulevel, years experience, teachers prepared to teach geometry
  14. 14. Results
  15. 15. Some interesting things to note • SES England, Japan, USA comparable. Singapore, Hong Kong slightly lower. Korea much higher. • English, Japanese, Korean students less time homework. • Japan lowest number of mathematics instruction hours, USA highest. • Geometry taught highest in Japan and Korea, lowest England and Singapore. • English teachers feel most prepared to teach geometry, Japanese teachers least. And more…
  16. 16. Multilevel tables (highlighted)
  17. 17. Some interesting things to note • Japan and Korea very little variance at classroom level: homogeneous. • At student level SES positive predictor in Japan, Korea, England, USA. But not Singapore and Hong Kong, likely more homogeneity. • OTL predictors mixed picture. For example: • Homework differential effect student and class level • Geometry content coverage not predictor • Most teacher quality variables not predictor • Instructional hours in Japan
  18. 18. Conclusions 1 I. How much of the variance in student achievement is explained by student- and classroom-level OTL curriculum factors within and across the six countries? Differs between countries, might reveal heterogeneity.
  19. 19. Conclusions 2 II. How much are these OTL curriculum factors related to geometry achievement at grade eight in England, Japan, Hong Kong SAR, Korea, Singapore and the USA? Geometry content coverage and teacher preparedness no predictors. Teacher variables only here and there. Instructional hours important for Japan. Weekly time spent on homework differential effects but not always intuitive. In short: it’s complex
  20. 20. Discussion • Interplay SES and OTL (curriculum time) …what can we address? • Definitions of OTL • Academic Learning Time? • Quality of instruction?) • Role shadow education • Not the final word: these analyses need to be complemented with more detailed, qualitative data about the curriculum. For example low scores Japan on the task to the right; they only did Pythagoras one year later. Which of these is the reason that triangle PQR is a right angle triangle? A. 32 + 42 = 52 B. 5 < 3 + 4 C. 3 + 4 = 12 – 5 D. 3 > 5 – 4
  21. 21. Thank you • C.Bokhove@soton.ac.uk • University of Southampton • Twitter: @cbokhove • Website: www.bokhove.net • British Academy IPM-2014 PM130271 project There are only two types of people in the world: those who believe in false dichotomies, and penguins.

×