Day 1 CBCN Training

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  • -Advocacy is the type of term that seems to mean different things to different people.
    -Chances are that all of us have at some point or another engaged in advocacy in some way or another.
    -Can be as simple as speaking on behalf of a friend, or as complex as arranging a lobby day on the Hill
    -At CBCN when we are talking about advocacy, we really mean that we strive to be an influencing factor on decision-makers, the public and the media.
    -As advocates in the breast cancer community we work to ensure that Canadians affected by breast cancer have a voice and their needs and concerns are being met.
  • Even though the reasons we advocate may differ from person to person, anyone who cares about an issue and is willing to make a difference can be an advocate –
    Promoting what works and challenging what doesn’t are the hallmarks of effective advocacy
  • If you think of advocacy as a three legged stool, the three pillars would be:
    Building relationships with people, communicating your message effectively and planning strategically, all of which we will be discussing today.
    It’s also helpful to know that when we talk about advocacy we can talk about both the short term and the long term, for example if we are hoping to raise awareness about an issue, it would likely be a shorter campaign, while a change to policy would be a larger term campaign.
    It’s a lot like a game of dominos where you want each piece set up to knock the next piece over.
    Identify and explain your issue;
    • Understand and explain yourissue betterthan anyone in government;
    • Fit yourissue within an existing government agenda or use it to set a new
    agenda; and
    • Build on existing relationships with decision makers or create new
    relationships.
  • What is yourissue? What do you want to see changed? Why doesit
    concern you?
    2. Who do you need to talk to? Who hasthe authority to make the change?
    (the hospital? The Minister of Health? Yourinsurance company?)
    3. How will you explain yourissue? What can you do to deliver your
    message? (a letter? A meeting? Both?)
    4. When asking for a change, keep yourrequest or “ask” to just one. This
    will help you to focus on the thing that you need the most and not a list
    of things that you would like to have.
    1. Select the policy issue that can effectively be addressed through
    advocacy and which will have the greatest impact on the problem.
    2. Identify target audiences - those with the ability to actually
    influence the policy issue you select.
    3. Set a specific policy goal for your initiative.
    4. Identify potential allies and opponents.
  • Planning is key to any successful advocacy effort.
    There are three basic steps to creating an effective advocacy plan:
    1. Develop your key messages
    2. Create your advocacy tools
    3. Focus on one main request – your one “ask”
    n Be prepared.
    Research your issue thoroughly and frame the issue carefully. Not everyone has the same background or understanding. Keep the message simple, direct
    and positive. Know who your target audience is and how they operate, whether it is a state legislature or city council.
    Get organized. Develop a strategy using an array of advocacy tools. Understand both your supporters and opponents.
    Sometimes, the best advocate is a convert. Know your target audience and focus your efforts there.
    Get into action. Monitor your progress. Keep track of how you are doing in terms of communicating effectively and making a
    difference. Adjust the strategy as necessary.
    Follow-up. Evaluate how effective you were. Identify weaknesses and work to improve. Thank everyone who got involved and helped in your
    efforts.
  • Your approach:
    Non-partisan, fact based, clear messaging
    Meeting with Government:
    Face-to-face meetings are a highly effective way to communicate with government
    Schedule meetings with both elected government officials as well as political and pubic service staff
    Contact information for government representatives and staff can usually be found online
    Identify your personal and professional contacts who may have established relationships with the people you need to see and who can make an invitation
  • Ask partners with complimentary advocacy objectives to meet with government representatives on your issue
    Look for credible influential allies
    The more people the issue is shown to be affecting the more likely the government will pay attention
  • Introductions/Set the stage (5-10 min)
    •Who you are (2 min)
    o About the organization (pre-approved key messages)
    o About the individuals in the meeting
    •Why you are there (3-5 min)
    o 3 key messages about your issue
    •Why you want to meet with this audience (3 min)
    o What's the connection? What role does he or she play in your issue?
    Why is this important/why should this be important to this person?
     
    Personalise the Issue (5-10 min)
    •Your story (5-8 min)
    •Questions from the individual/team you are meeting with (2-5 min)
     
    Make a Request (1-2 min)
    •What can this person do to help?
    •Is there a timeline or deadline that it needs to be done by?
     
    Discuss/Explore Possibilities (8-10 min)
    •What is this person interested in doing/able to do?
    •What barriers might he or she face?
    •What are you or your organization prepared to do to help?
    Confirm Next Steps (1-2 min)
    •What are the actions and next steps that you, your organization, and this
    person have agreed to?
    •When and how will everyone check back in for an update?
  • Being politically non-partisan. We offer our general perspective and specific advice to governments of all political stripes. Being non-ideological. We recognize that a wide range of stakeholders in Canada is interested in, and necessary to, making progress on breast cancer concerns. These interests include government, business, labour, aboriginal interests, scientists and other non-government organizations. We support or work with anyone who shares our mission. Being efficient. We focus on the key players who must make decisions in the interests of conservation. In some cases, this may be one or two strategically-placed individuals. In other cases, decision makers may first need to be convinced of public will, so our target may be the general public. Getting results. We seek commitments that are sufficient to achieve results and specific enough so that progress can be measured. We will not be satisfied with partial commitments that don't really do the job, or worse, rhetorical commitments which create the illusion of progress. Being scientifically accurate. We base our advocacy on the best scientific advice available,
    Doing our homework well. We thoroughly analyze both the substance and the strategy of an issue before publicly engaging in it. If for some reason we cannot do this, it is better not to engage an issue through advocacy, because it will not be "advocacy with impact."Checking someone else's homework. We do not risk our credibility by uncritically accepting that others have done their homework up to our standard. Staying within our area of expertise. We do not take official positions issues beyond the scope of our expertise.Trying cooperative approaches first. We make an honest and thorough effort to influence decision making through a cooperative approach, clearly documenting the response (or lack of), before we move to more critical approaches. Taking the high road. Throughout our advocacy efforts we stick to our principles, and do not engage in personal or institutional attacks. Being prepared to say No. We do not advocate causes or positions simply because others want us to, without having met all the other conditions listed above.
  • CBCN:
    CBCN strives to represent the needs and concerns of those affected by breast cancer to decision-makers, media, industry officials and the general public.
    As such we connect with decision makers to help raise awareness around needs of those affected by breast cancer that will inform policies that will improve the quality of life for patients and survivors.
    We hold in-person survivor advocate training days to provide survivors with the tools and opportunities to share their experience with decision makers and advocate for change.
    And we connect with other patient groups and partner organizations to collaborate on similar advocacy issues
    Engage media to raise awareness around priority advocacy issues.
    As our mandate is really to champion the voice of Canadians affected by breast cancer to decision makers, we focus our efforts around ensuring that the voices of under represented groups are given a greater profile. As such we have identified the following key areas as our current advocacy :
    Drug Access:
    CBCN is heavily engaged in conversations both federally, and provincially regarding improving access to medications across provinces.
    We have called for catastrophic drug coverage, intended to protect Canadians from undue financial burden. Most provinces have some form of catastrophic coverage, with the notable exception of New Brunswick, however the equality of these plans is uneven with some provinces, like MB covering all drugs, and others only covering a few.
    In addition, CBCN has also delved into conversations regarding the implementation of a national Pharmacare strategy, which would operate similarly to the current Medicare system.
    Most heavily, CBCN has been extensively involved in conversations surrounding the provision and access to new and emerging essential medicines . As medicines come down the pipeline, access to these drugs is subject to provincial review, and there is often an inherent inequality to the accessibility of medications across the country. CBCN has been instrumental in ensuring that the patient perspective on new breast cancer drugs is included in the drug review process.
    EI sickness benefits-CBCN has been pushing for the extension of EI sickness benefits from 15 weeks to at least 40 weeks in keeping with the average duration of cancer treatment.
  • Providing funds to support health care delivery in the provinces
    and territories and direct delivery of care to certain groups,
    Directing delivery of health care servicesto:
    • First Nations people living on reserves
    • Inuit
    • the Canadian Forces
    • the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • eligible veterans
    • inmatesin federal penitentiaries
    • refugee claimants
    the federal
    government also provides:
    • Public health programs to prevent disease, and to promote health and
    educate the public on health implications of the choices they make;
    • Health protection that includes food safety and nutrition, and regulation
    of pharmaceuticals, medical devices, consumer products and pest
    management products;
    • Funding for health research and health information activities; and
    • Federal health-related tax measures that include tax creditsfor medical
    expenses, disability, caregivers and infirm dependents, tax rebatesto public
    institutionsfor health services, and deductionsfor private health insurance
    premiumsforthe self-employed.
  • Provincial and territorial health care includes care in a hospital and the services
    of a physician or other health professional(medicare). plan for and provide Medicare
    free of charge.(Medicare covered health services are funded through taxes).
    Most provinces and territories also provide additionalservicesfor certain groups
    such aslow-income residents and seniorssuch as:
    • drugs prescribed outside hospitals
    • ambulance costs
    • hearing, vision and dental care not already covered
    Provincial and territorial
    governments:
    • Administertheir health insurance plans
    • Plan, pay for and evaluate hospital care, physician care, allied health care,
    prescription drug care in hospitals and public health; and,
    • Negotiate fee schedulesfor health professiona
  • Approval of new medications (federal)
    Drug reimbursement (provincial)
    Health programs (provincial)
    Employment Insurance (federal)
    Support programs (provincial/federal)
  • The Prime Minister is the leader of the party in power and is the Head of Government. A Prime Minister's duties include presiding over Cabinet meetings, meeting official foreign delegations to Ottawa and answering questions in the House of Commons. Since the Prime Minister is usually a Member of Parliament (two Prime Ministers who held office in the 1890s were Senators), he or she also spends time helping constituents.
    The Prime Minister chooses the Cabinet Ministers, and the Governor General formally appoints them. Most are MPs, and there is always at least one representative from the Senate. The Prime Minister and Cabinet meet regularly to discuss and decide on various topics such as government spending, ideas for bills, and new policies, programs and services. Most Cabinet Ministers are in charge of a government department and they report on their department's activities to Parliament. There are also Ministers of State who are assigned to assist a Cabinet Minister in a specific area within his or her portfolio. These areas often concern government priorities.
    A key feature of Cabinet is the concept of collective responsibility, which means that all Ministers share responsibility for the administration of government and for the government's policies. They must all support a Cabinet decision. They may not agree with it, but they have to support it in public. If a Minister cannot support a decision, he or she must resign from Cabinet.
    Another important feature of our parliamentary system is responsible government. This means that the government must have the support of the majority of Members in the House of Commons to stay in power. In the British tradition, if the government loses a vote on a major measure, or on any motion of non-confidence, it is expected to resign or to ask the Governor General to call a general election.
    Parliamentary Secretary
    Parliamentary Secretaries are MPs in the House of Commons who are appointed by the Prime Minister to help Cabinet Ministers. They table documents or answer questions for a Minister, participate in debates on bills, sit as members of committees and speak on government policies and proposals, and serve as a link between parliamentarians and Ministers.
    Leader of the Opposition and Critics
    The role of the Official Opposition is to challenge government policies, hold the government accountable for its actions and give voters an alternative in the next election. Generally, the Leader of the Opposition is the leader of the party with the second largest membership in the Commons. This person leads opposition debates and suggests changes to government legislation or alternative proposals. Each opposition party in the Commons has its own leader and appoints critics from among its members. Each critic handles a certain subject, such as health or defence. They present their party's policies on the subject and comment on government policies.
    House Leaders
    Each recognized party appoints one member to be its House Leader (a recognized party is one that has a minimum of 12 seats in the House of Commons). The House Leaders of all the parties meet regularly to discuss upcoming business in the Commons, how long bills will be debated and when special issues will be discussed.
    Whips
    Each recognized party also has a Whip. The Whips ensure that enough party members are in the Chamber for debates and votes. Given the many responsibilities MPs have, this is not always easy. The Whips also determine which committees a party member will sit on, assign offices and seats in the House, and discipline members who break party ranks.
  • Central Agencies: Cabinet Office, Finance and Treasury Board and Secretariat
    Line Ministries: Eg, Health and Long term Care, Education, Natural Resources
    Cabinet Committees: Eg, Health and Social Services Policy Committees
    Legislature: Legislative Assembly and its committees
  • A quick summary of how funding decisions for drugs are made. The pharma manufacturer submits to Health Canada who assess the drug based on health, safety, and efficacy and issues a notice of compliance and drug identification number. This process can take up to 2 years and is non-transparent.
    From there the drugs are sent for further review by PCODR (oncology drugs) the Common drug review and non-common drug review products looks at both clinical evidence and cost-effectiveness
    At this point the PCODR process allows for patient submissions and can take 5-8 months to complete. Upon pCODR’s recommendation drugs are then subject to provincial review. Previously this was an independent negotiation with each province, but now there is a new mechanism, the Pan-Canadian Purchasing Alliance, under which numerous provinces elect to negotiate with the Pharmas around the pricing of drugs. It is not yet clear if the PCPA also will have a drug evaluation component to it, or if drugs will still be subject to independent review by the provinces. BC and QC also are not part of the PCPA and still conduct their own evaluations.
  • Policy platform process
    Speech from the Throne
    Budgets
    Policy papers/consultations
    Standing Committees
    Bills/Motions to Parliament
    Question Period
    Representation by lobby groups/companies/associations/individuals
    Media play
  • Things to consider:
    Identify the problem
    What are the barriers to solving the problem?
    What policy changes are needed to address the problem?
    What resources are needed? (ie. funding)
    Should a new policy be created
    Should a policy be removed
    Should an existing policy be refined/ or implemented
    Is there a funding implication to
  • They should clearly state what will change, who will make that change, by how much, and by when.
    When goals are vague and ambiguous, it is difficult to clearly understand what
    your advocacy initiative is trying to achieve and hard to maintain focus. This
    also makes it hard to evaluate your efforts.
  • Media is a conduit to have your voice heard
    Media tend to cover stories with a human interest angle (i.e. a patient or a caregivers personal perspective)
    However, you need to find a ‘news hook’ to hang your story on-this is something that will make the story new and timely
    Media coverage gets the attention of decision-makers
    May compel them to do (or not do) something
    The media is a powerful tool that, if utilized properly, can result in the ability to affect change.
    Everyone listens to the news
    It’s important to learn how news media works in order to exert some form of control, or initiate some form of action around an issue that matters to you.
  • Before reaching out to a media outlet…
    Follow reporters to determine/understand their interests
    Find out which reporter(if any) has been affected by the issue personally
    When reaching out to media, understand that
    Assignment editors are responsible for assigning stories to journalists
    News editors are responsible for what gets published
    Health reporters are responsible for researching and developing stories
  • Define your audience–Decide who
    you want to reach, whether state or
    local leaders or the general public. This
    will help you determine which media
    format will work best.
    Set goals and objectives for your
    media efforts–Your goals may be as
    general as educating the public about
    child abuse and neglect but objectives
    should be more specific. Objectives
    include a specific time frame for completion
    and measurement for success.
    the best approach–There are
    a number of vehicles available for
    conveying your message through the
    media. These include:
    n News/press releases
    n Press conferences
    n Letters to the editor
    n Guest editorials
    n Meetings with editorial boards
    n Public forums or events
    n Speaking directly with reporters
    who cover children’s issues
    Consider your organization’s needs
    and goals and choose the best approach
    for you.
    Develop personal contacts–Reaching
    people in the media can be difficult.
    Keep in mind that reporters and editors
    have frequent deadlines and may have
    odd office hours. Be patient and
    persistent. Try alternative ways of connecting,
    either through email or fax.
  • More people read letters to the
    editor than almost any other section
    in the newspaper, especially in smaller
    communities. So they are a great way
    to spread the word about important
    issues. Remember–elected officials and
    other policy makers typically keep an
    eye on letters to the editor as a way of
    gauging public opinion.
    Letters to the editor should be
    short and to the point (usually 250 to
    500 words). Make your first sentence
    catchy and you will hook more readers.
    Include your telephone number or
    email address if you want to recruit
    others to your cause.
    When writing your letter to the
    editor, remember these tips:
    n Be brief. Newspapers will often
    specify a maximum length. If not,
    check out the other letters in your
    paper to get an idea. If a letter
    is too long, it will be edited and
    you could lose some of your most
    important facts and ideas.
    n Reference your letter to current
    events. If possible, refer to a recent
    news story or an article that has
    appeared in the newspaper. Tie
    your subject into what is happening
    in your state or community.
    n Skip the form letters. Mass mailings
    of form letters are obvious and
    usually less likely to get published.
    n Include solutions. For example,
    connect readers to an innovative
    new approach to the problem you
    are addressing. Always stress the
    possibilities, not just the problems.
    n Give your address and phone
    number. Most newspapers will
    verify your identity before they will
    print a letter. Most will not publish
    anonymous letters.
  • Op-ed pieces or guest editorials are
    printed on the editorial page and represent
    the views of an individual or
    organization, usually someone who is
    considered an “expert” on the topic
    or issue they are addressing. Typically,
    guest editorials range from 500 to 800
    words. If well thought-out and well written,
    they can have a major impact
    on policy makers, journalists and the
    general public.
    Writing an editorial may be easier
    than you think. Ask yourself why
    the public should support your issue.
    Consider using the information and statistics
    you have at your disposal, both locally and from state and national
    reports. Your goal is to educate and
    persuade. Be clear, concise and to the
    point. Avoid overly emotional or sentimental
    appeals.
    Here are some tips for writing your
    guest editorial:
    n Keep your words, sentences and
    paragraphs short.
    n Avoid acronyms, technical phrases
    and jargon that may confuse the
    reader. Avoid rhetoric and back up
    assertions with facts.
    n Ask someone who knows nothing
    about your issue to proof your article
    before you submit it. If it makes
    sense to them, it will probably
    make sense to the average newspaper
    reader.
  • Issues at play in the breast cancer arena:
    Access to new treatments
    Funding for breast cancer research
    Health system reform
    Availability of support for those fighting breast cancer
    Economic Impact of breast cancer
  • Politicians and other decision makers that you are trying to influence hear many
    different message sfrom many different people and groups all the time. If you
    want them to hear you, make sure your message stands out and that you deliver
    it to the right person at the right time
    1. What-Identify your issue
    Focus on the things that you are concerned about and want to see changed.
    Take a position or stand.
    2. Why - Explain the issue
    Write out three key messages that explain your issue and your concerns in clear language.
    Your key messages must be brief, easy to remember ,simple, true and provable.
    Practice presenting your key messages to family and friends who may not be aware of your issue to see if they are able to understand your concern.
    Rehearse your key messages, as they will form the basis for all written and verbal communication with decision-makers, other advocates and the media.
  • Politicians and other decision makers that you are trying to influence hear many
    different message sfrom many different people and groups all the time. If you
    want them to hear you, make sure your message stands out and that you deliver
    it to the right person at the right time
    1. What-Identify your issue
    Focus on the things that you are concerned about and want to see changed.
    Take a position or stand.
    2. Why - Explain the issue
    Write out three key messages that explain your issue and your concerns in clear language.
    Your key messages must be brief, easy to remember ,simple, true and provable.
    Practice presenting your key messages to family and friends who may not be aware of your issue to see if they are able to understand your concern.
    Rehearse your key messages, as they will form the basis for all written and verbal communication with decision-makers, other advocates and the media.
  • 1. “Are you on deadline?” Make this your first question, whether you call or have been called. Reporters always appreciate a deadline-sensitive caller, and you'll stand out from the rest of their callers. Better yet, it lets you know how much time you have to respond, even if it's only the next 10 minutes.
    2. “When is your deadline?” Essential fact to know, and adhere to. Responding late means missing your chance to contribute.
    3. “What are you looking for from me/us?” In addition to your message, what's on the reporter's mind? The answer to this question will tell you the story's direction and what the reporter is hoping you can provide, whether it's background or a comment.
    4. “Who else have you talked to?” Learn the context that other sources will provide, so you can better understand your role in supplying information. Be ready to suggest authoritative sources who agree and disagree with you.
    5. “Is there a news event driving this?” The answer will tell you about the story's urgency, and angle. Is is a feature, analysis, or news?
    6. “Is there another time we can talk? I’m right in the middle of something at the moment.” Most reporters' initial calls are simply to secure time to talk to you. You don't actually need to start answering questions right away, and may give a better interview if you have some preparation time. So take that opportunity, even if it's only 5 minutes.
    7. “Do you need to call me during the work day (or later) in your time zone?” Be a thoughtful source who pays attention to time zones when you get calls from far-flung reporters.
    8. “What’s the best time to reach you?” Don't make assumptions about reporters' schedules. Deadlines now occur hourly or sooner, and multiple times throughout the day. It's best to ask to find out this particular reporter's schedule.
    9. “When do you hope this will appear?” A savvy question. Reporters aren't in control of when stories appear, but may have some sense of what to expect in terms of publication.
    1o. “Why don’t you ask me…?” If you've got a particularly relevant fact that the reporter hasn't probed and you haven't offered -- or, if you can only offer that fact if asked -- this is a great question that rarely fails to result in the question you want to answer. Just make sure you don't waste it on something obvious, gratuitous or trivial.
    11. "What are you taking away from this?" Don't wait to read your words or suggestions in the published copy. Before you finish the interview, ask this question to learn what the reporter heard and the sense she has of your contributions. If you do it before you finish the interview, you can send the reporter off with the right take-away lesson.
    12. "Where will this appear?" These days, no reporter is an island, and most are putting stories together to run in many formats. So ask this question, knowing that some stories will appear in many formats--video, audio, web and print--but sometimes, only in one formas. You want to know which ones, and which will appear when--again, the reporter may not know the latter, but should have a good idea of the former.
  • Make short, simple, and specific statements.
    Explain your most important point first.
    Don't stray from the topic.
    Summarize and then elaborate. Example: "We have the best organization in the area because our volunteers really care. Let me explain what I mean…."
    Answering questions Keep it short: If your answers are so long-winded that you get cut off thinking "But there's more I had to say" in an interview, you should learn how long the modern soundbite is. Think single digits, in seconds. (Besides, a short answer gives the reporter a chance to do his job and ask another question. Be sure you leave time for him, too.) When you think you've answered a question adequately, don't feel compelled to keep talking simply because the interviewer has a microphone up to your mouth. If you're satisfied with your answer, sit in silence. Rambling leads you to say the wrong thing.
    Use your message wisely, not too well: Once you've figured out what you want to say, how do you use that message in an interview without repeating it like a robot?   
    Respond, don't react, to questions: If you disagree with the reporter in the middle of a recorded interview, that might become the story. A real-life case study with suggestions for doing it differently. In general, it's a good idea to remember that you should respond--not react--to the reporter's question.
    Get to the point: How interview answers differ from lectures: If you keep telling the interviewer that you're going to tell him soon the answer to his question, he (and the audience) might not want to wait around. Here's how to stop that bad habit and get to the point faster.
    hink before you speak. Avoid fillers such as uh, ah, well, yeah, and you know. (Radio and TV)
    Respond to negative questions with positive responses.
    Always tell the truth. Your credibility is crucial.
    Avoid "off the record." If you say something to a reporter, expect that it will end up in print. If you don't want it printed, don't say it.
    Avoid "no comment" answers. It sounds as if you have something to hide
  • Some interviewers can become hostile; others are just uninformed. Don’t get caught in an emotional or intellectual game with the interviewer. Following are some "interviewer types" and question traps and some responses you may want to try.
    The Unprepared Interviewer:
    May have vague questions or require you to provide a lot of background before you can get to your key message.
  • The Machine Gunner.
    Asks so many questions that you don’t know which one to answer first
    The Response:
    “You’ve asked many interesting questions. First I’d like to address, …”
  • Some interviewers can become hostile; others are just uninformed. Don’t get caught in an emotional or intellectual game with the interviewer. Following are some "interviewer types" and question traps and some responses you may want to try.
    The Interrupter
    Jumps in before you’ve had a chance to complete your response.
    The Response:
    Let him complete the interruption, then say: "Before I answer that, I’d like to complete my thought."
  • The Paraphraser:
    Tries to put words in your mouth
    May ask hypothetical questions
    Often inaccurate in conclusions
    The Response:
    “No, that isn’t what I said. What I said was..." and repeat your point.
  • The Expert:
    Usually well-informed
    Knowledgeable and respectful
    Asks well conceived questions
    Usually a pleasant interview
  • Strategies for handling question traps:
    Either/Or. When the answer is not "black or white," say so.
    Negative: Richard Nixon-are you a crook? Don’t repeat negative questions, ramble or “educate” a reporter beyond your messages. If they need addition information, send them to a factual source. Otherwise, when pressed with negative questions and premises, you need to bridge back to your message points.
    “The real issue here is…”
    “No, but I can say this about that…”
    “I don’t know about that...but what I do know is…”
    “What you’re asking is…”
    “It’s true that…but it’s also true that…”
    “Just the opposite is true…”
    “That’s false…”
    Absent Party. Don’t get trapped into being a spokesperson for another individual, business, or organization or into criticizing an absent person or organization.
    Ambush: Pre-emptive statement, zoom out on larger picture and bridge back to key message
    False Statement. Correct incorrect information immediately. Don’t repeat the misinformation; this only reinforces it.
    Hypothetical. You do not have to answer a question that is hypothetical or conditional. It presents a scenario that never occurred.
  • You do have the right to:
    Know the topic, participants and format
    Know if the interview will be live/taped
    Know if the interview will be edited or used in its entirety
    Expect fairness
    You do NOT have the right to:
    Know the questions in advance
    See story in advance
    Change your quotes or edit the story
    Expect your view to be the only presented
  • Ask: Who has a Facebook profile?
  • News Feed: The news feed is your Facebook home page, and the first thing you see when you sign on to Facebook. It gives you regular updates from the friends you follow and connect with.
  • Status Update: Allows users to quickly update their friends on their lives or share news and information. People can attach pictures, videos and links and tag their friends in their updates.
  • Wall: A space on a user’s profile that allows their friends to post information. It is different from a private message in that allows all of your friends to see the message. A private message is solely between certain individuals and is not made public to the rest of your friends.
  • Tagging: A tag can be attached to any update that you post, whether it be a simple status update or a photo you have posted. It links a person, a page, or a place (Geotagging, or “Checking in”) to your update.
  • Share: Facebook allows people to share content that others have previously posted. If someone posts information that you think is relevant to the rest of your friends or followers, you are able to share this post with them.
    Many websites have included sharing capabilities to allow you to post their content directly to your profile. For example, if you see a funny video on YouTube, you can press the Share Button and add a comment like “This is so funny, you’ve got to watch it!”
  • Like: All updates have a “like” button attached allowing you to notify the author that you enjoyed their post.
     
    You can also “Like” a fan page which allows you to follow the content that they share. Ex, “Like us on Facebook!”
  • It’s public!: Which means you are not limited to who can see your content and messaging. A public page will appear in Google searches as well, making your campaign easy to find.
    Helps keep your private information private!: It allows you to keep your personal information separate from your public campaign. While you might often be using your personal experiences to help move your cause along, you won’t want to share your personal relationships with the public. This allows you to keep your world’s separate while still utilizing all of the tools Facebook provides its users (sharing, tagging other pages, liking photos etc.)
    Facebook Insights page: Facebook Pages allow you to track and monitor your activity and how it is being received. You can see how many people view your posts, follow your page, and track your demographic. This will help you know what content people are engaging with. For example, people tend to take more interest if there is a visual aid attached to your message.
    Newsfeed Marketing: Regularly posting content allows you to show up more frequently on your fans newsfeeds. If fans interact with your Page you will show up on their friends’ newsfeeds! This is key to gaining more followers and more awareness. BUT you don’t want to be annoying so be mindful of the frequency of your posts. Too many posts can have a negative effect on your followers.
  • Ask: Who has Twitter?
  • Followers vs. Following: A follower is a user who subscribes to your tweets. Following refers to the users you subscribe to. Typically a user wants to have a higher number of followers compared to the number of users they are following. Following on Twitter is not mutual.
  • Hashtags & Trends: Used with the # prefix, a hashtag is used to group topics. If you add the prefix onto a word or phrase (with no spacing) it will automatically link your tweet to all other tweets using that same hashtag.
    For example, if I were to add the #breastcancer hashtag onto the end of my tweet it will link to a page displaying current tweets on the same topic.
    Any word or phrase can be made into a hashtag. It has become a popular means of campaigning and spreading awareness on certain topics and causes.
    Twitter Chats: A hashtag can be used to host group conversations. For example, Monday nights are host to the #bcsm (breast cancer social media) chat. There are 3 discussion moderators, one being a doctor, who choose different topics each week. People tweet using the #bcsm hashtag and ask questions or offer support to those affected by breast cancer.
  • @Mentions vs. @Replies:
    Mentions: A Mention is a tweet that incorporates another twitter user into the body of your tweet. This can be used if you are tweeting about another user, promoting another user’s event or initiating a conversation.
    They are then notified of your tweet and can choose to reply. This can help promote both pages and increase visibility.
    Replies are used in response to tweets. By clicking on the “reply” button underneath a tweet you are able to directly comment and contribute to the conversation. The user’s @username will be included at the very start of the tweet.
    *Once published it will look just like a mention but the conversation thread can be viewed. People will only see others' @replies in their home timeline if they are following both the sender and recipient of the @reply.
  • Retweet: A re-posting of someone else’s tweet. If you read a tweet from another user that you wish to share as well you can ‘retweet’ to share it with your followers. Retweets help boost your visibility on Twitter by allowing a larger reach to users who may not be following you yet.
  • Notification Page: Monitors all activity associated with your twitter account. It tracks who has recently followed, mentioned, or retweeted you.
  • Discovery Page: A filtered News Feed that expands tweets to include the graphic or summary of an article that is posted. It is tailored to you and is based on your followers and content that you tweet about.
  • Micro-blogging: Essentially tweeting is like a mini blog. You are able to share your thoughts, current information, articles, etc. that is relevant to your cause but you do so in quick and to-the-point messaging.
    Networking: By utilizing Twitter’s popular functions you are easily able to network with people or organizations creating more awareness around your issue.
    Mention an organization that you think is doing some great work or directly ask a question to someone that you think can help you. It is a public forum so if you tweet at your local MP or a popular organization they will likely acknowledge you in some way.
    The same can be said for retweets. It is a quick and easy way to acknowledge other users and allows you to gain awareness.
    Hashtags: Hashtags have changed the way in which we communicate digitally. Hashtagging a keyword in your message not only allows your message to have a larger reach but it also specifically targets people who have similar interests. This is important because a far reach does not mean as much if it is not pointed at the right audience.
    Using hashtags in awareness campaigns have become a very popular way to promote and raise awareness. It is important, however, to have a direct ask to go along with your unique hashtag. Simply asking someone to use your hashtag is a good start but you will have a greater impact if you require more engagement. Ask people to share photos and thoughts relevant to your cause while including your hashtag.
    *Everything posted on Twitter is live. Meaning that every time you look at your newsfeed, the content is always changing.
  • Day 1 CBCN Training

    1. 1. The National Network and Voice of Breast Cancer Survivors and Patients
    2. 2. The Canadian Breast Cancer Network The Canadian Breast Cancer Network (CBCN) is Canada's leading survivor-directed, national network of organizations and individuals concerned about breast cancer. CBCN strives to voice the views and concerns of Canadians affected by breast cancer through promotion of information sharing, education and advocacy activities.
    3. 3. Vision & Mission Vision The best quality of life for all Canadians affected by breast cancer Mission •National Network - Links and supports groups and individuals to promote information exchange and collaboration •Educate and Inform - Provides credible breast cancer related information and education to those affected by breast cancer •Advocacy - Promotes equitable access to support and care throughout the breast cancer experience to ensure best quality of life. CBCN also ensures that the issues affecting breast cancer survivors and their families inform health care policy and guide research.
    4. 4. National, regional and local Cancer Organizations and Patient Groups Canadian Breast Cancer Network (CBCN) Canadian Breast Cancer Network (CBCN) CBCN’s National Network Community Health Organizations Industry (Pharma) Physicians and Researchers Patient Groups (Non-Cancer) Professional Organizations Federal Government Provincial Governments & Provincial CancerCare Breast Cancer Survivors and Patients Community Breast Cancer Organizations & Support Groups Provincial & Territorial Breast Cancer Organizations National Breast Cancer Organizations
    5. 5. Education & Information • CBCN’s website www.cbcn.ca • Online Webinars • Educational Retreats and Conferences for patients and survivors • Published Educational Resources: – “Never Too Young: Psychosocial Information and Support for Young Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer” (Handbook) – “Intimacy and Sexuality After Breast Cancer” training manual for workshop facilitation – “Network News” a semi-annual magazine – “Outreach” a monthly e- newsletter
    6. 6. CBCN’s Advocacy • Through CBCN’s advocacy program we connect with decision makers to help raise awareness around the needs of those affected by breast cancer that will inform policies that will improve the quality of life for patients and survivors. • CBCN holds in-person advocacy training days to provide patients & survivors with the tools and opportunities to share their experience with decision makers and advocate for change. • CBCN connects with other patient groups and partner organizations to collaborate on similar advocacy issues • Engage media to raise awareness around priority advocacy issues. CBCN’s Priority Advocacy Issues 2014 1.Metastatic Breast Cancer – awareness around the unique needs of women with metastatic breast cancer and timely access to new drugs 2.The extension of EI sickness benefits from 15 weeks
    7. 7. CBCN’s Advocacy • Research reports published by CBCN help raise awareness around priority issues, there reports include: • Metastatic Breast Cancer in Canada: The lived experience of patients and caregivers (2013) in collaboration with Rethink Breast Cancer • Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening (2013) in collaboration with the DisAbled Women’s Network of Canada • Economic Impact of Breast Cancer and Labour Force Re-Entry (2010) • Breast Cancer Wait Times Report (2008) • Nothing Fit Me: The Information and Support Needs of Young Women with Breast Cancer Report (2003) • Perspectives of Rural Women with Breast Cancer (2001)
    8. 8. Priority Populations Underserved populations: •Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer •Aboriginal, First Nations and Inuit women •Women with disabilities •Women with mental health issues •Women in rural and remote areas of Canada •Immigrant women Breast cancer survivors and patients
    9. 9. Connect with Us … Website: www.cbcn.ca 1-800-685-8820 Email: cbcn@cbcn.ca
    10. 10. Advocacy With Impact: Advocacy Overview
    11. 11. What is Advocacy? Newton’s First Law of Motion: “An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless an external force is applied to it.
    12. 12. Who is an Advocate ? • Anyone with a story to tell and constructive ideas for change • Decision-makers respond most to credible, sincere, organized groups who effectively bring their issues to the forefront
    13. 13. How Does Advocacy Work? • It’s about building relationships-with government and other stakeholders • Its is a set of strategic, targeted actions directed at decision-makers to achieve change • Can involve a series of specific short-term activities to incrementally achieve a long-term vision.
    14. 14. What is Planning for Advocacy • The Problem: What is your issue? What do you want to see changed? Why does it concern you? • The Solution: What needs to happen? • The Outcome: What are the changes that will result? When asking for a change, keep your request or “ask” to just one. This will help you to focus on the thing that you need the most and not a list of things that you would like to have. • The Targets: Who do you need to talk to? Who has the authority to make the change? (the hospital? The Minister of Health? Insurance company?) • The Approach: How will you explain your issue? What can you do to deliver your message? (a letter? A meeting? Both?)
    15. 15. Planning for Advocacy • Be prepared:  Develop your key messages  Create your advocacy tools  Focus on one main request-your key “ask” • Get organized. • Get into action. • Monitor your progress. • Follow-up.
    16. 16. Building Relationships Meeting with Government:  Face-to-face meetings are a highly effective way to communicate with government  Schedule meetings with both elected government officials as well as political and pubic service staff  Contact information for government representatives and staff can usually be found online  Identify your personal and professional contacts who may have established relationships with the people you need to see and who can make an invitation
    17. 17. Meetings • Ask partners with complimentary advocacy objectives to meet with government representatives on your issue • Look for credible influential allies • The more people the issue is shown to be affecting the more likely the government will pay attention
    18. 18. Meeting with Elected Representatives • Contact the official’s scheduler to request a time to meet  Be flexible in determining a date and time to meet • If possible bring a constituent from the MPP’s riding to the meeting • Do your homework and prepare thoroughly for the meeting  Stay on message  Identify where your ask fits within the government agenda • Prepare brief information articulating your position to leave behind after the meeting • Tell the human side of the story
    19. 19. What to Expect in an Advocacy Meeting • Introductions/Setting the Stage (5-10 min) • Personalize the Issue (5-10 min) • Making a Request (1-2 min) • Discuss/Explore Possibilities (8-10 min) • Confirm Next Steps (1-2 min)
    20. 20. Other Tactics • Petitions • Marches/rallies • Report cards • Policy papers • Speeches • Seminars/symposia • Political fundraisers • Media engagement
    21. 21. Advocacy at CBCN Our Approach: • Non-partisan • Non-ideological • Efficient • Results oriented • Evidence based • Cooperative • Specific • Ethical
    22. 22. Advocacy at CBCN • Drug Access  Catastrophic  Pharmacare • EI Sickness Benefits • Metastatic Breast Cancer
    23. 23. CBCN Metastatic Breast Cancer Campaign • Focus around raising awareness about the unique and distinct needs of Canadians affected by metastatic breast cancer • Main focus for the campaign: ⁻ Increased awareness and understanding of metastatic breast cancer and the experience of Canadians living with this stage of the disease ⁻ Improved health services to meet the needs of Canadians living with metastatic breast cancer ⁻ Equitable and timely drug access to new treatments for metastatic breast cancer ⁻ Increased investments in research to improve outcomes for Canadians living with metastatic breast cancer ⁻ Improved surveillance and statistical data of metastatic breast cancer in Canada
    24. 24. CBCN Metastatic Breast Cancer Campaign • CBCN calling for parliamentary motion to recognize October 13th as national metastatic awareness day • Individual navigation and drug access campaigns across Canada • Outreach to health professionals to increase knowledge, awareness and understanding • Increased education, information and resources • Mobilizing to create a united voice and community for Canadians living with metastatic breast cancer.
    25. 25. Questions?
    26. 26. Advocacy With Impact: Inside Government
    27. 27. Government Jurisdictions in health Federal Government: • Provides funds to support health care delivery in the provinces and territories and direct delivery of care to certain groups (First Nations, military personnel etc). • Health Education • Health protection • Health Funding • Health related tax measures
    28. 28. Government Jurisdictions Provincial and territorial health care: •Responsible for administering Medicare free of charge. •Implementing and evaluating hospital care, physician care, allied health care, prescription drug care in hospitals and public health •Negotiating fee schedules for health professionals.
    29. 29. Is Your Issue a Federal/Provincial/Local Responsibility? This will determine who/what level of government you are targeting in your advocacy plans. •Approval of new medications (federal) •Drug reimbursement (provincial) •Health programs (provincial) •Employment Insurance (federal) • Support programs (provincial/federal)
    30. 30. Key Components of Government
    31. 31. Key Components of Government • Central Agencies: Cabinet Office, Finance and Treasury Board and Secretariat • Line Ministries: Eg, Health and Long term Care, Education, Natural Resources • Cabinet Committees: Eg, Health and Social Services Policy Committees • Legislature: Legislative Assembly and its committees
    32. 32. Drug Approval Process in Canada
    33. 33. New Metastatic Breast Cancer Drugs • Numerous new treatments emerging for treatment of metastatic breast cancer Name Indication Manufacturer Status Afinitor HR+,HER2- Novartis AB/BC/NB/NS/ON/ YK/QC/SK Tykerb HER2+ GSK AB/BC/NB/NS/ON/ QC/SK/YK Perjeta HER2+ Hoffman-LaRoche ON/BC/SK/AB/MB Kadcyla HER2+ Hoffman-LaRoche SK Palbociclib ER+,HER2- Pfizer Experimental stage LEE011 ER+,HER2- Novartis Experimental stage Bemaciclib ER+,HER2- Eli Lilly Experimental
    34. 34. Policy Process Today • Policy platform process • Speech from the Throne • Budgets • Policy papers/consultations • Standing Committees • Bills/Motions to Parliament • Question Period • Representation by lobby groups/companies/associations/individuals • Media play
    35. 35. Advocacy With Impact: Defining Your Ask
    36. 36. Defining Your Ask A few things to consider: 1.Identify the problem 2.What are the barriers to solving the problem? 3.What policy changes are needed to address the problem? 4.What resources are needed? (ie. funding)
    37. 37. Advocacy “asks” should be: SMART Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Time-bound Defining your ask
    38. 38. Advocacy With Impact: Media and Your Messages
    39. 39. The Power of the Media • Media is a conduit to have your voice heard • Media tend to cover stories with a human interest angle (i.e. a patient or a caregivers personal perspective) • Media coverage gets the attention of decision-makers  May compel them to do (or not do) something • The media is a powerful tool that, if utilized properly, can result in the ability to affect change. • Everyone listens to the news • It’s important to learn how news media works in order to exert some form of control, or initiate some form of action around an issue that matters to you.
    40. 40. Speaking to the Right Person • Before reaching out to a media outlet… Follow reporters to determine/understand their interests Find out which reporter(if any) has been affected by the issue personally • When reaching out to media, understand that Assignment editors are responsible for assigning stories to journalists News editors are responsible for what gets published Health reporters are responsible for researching and developing stories
    41. 41. Using Media for Advocacy • Define your audience • Set goals and objectives for your media efforts • Select the best approach:  News/press releases  Press conferences  Letters to the editor  Guest editorials  Meetings with editorial boards  Public forums or events • Develop personal contacts
    42. 42. Letters to the Editor •Be brief •Establish a ‘hook’ •Skip the form letters •Give your address and phone number
    43. 43. Op-Eds •500-800 words max •Avoid acronyms, and jargon •Avoid rhetoric and use facts and statistics to back up your assertions. •Add stories for interest
    44. 44. Advocacy and the Breast Cancer Movement Issues at play in the breast cancer arena: •Access to new treatments •Funding for breast cancer research •Health system reform •Availability of support for those fighting breast cancer •Economic Impact of breast cancer
    45. 45. Key Players in Canada • National Organizations: – Canadian Breast Cancer Network: Focus on all breast cancer survivors and patients providing information, networking and advocacy – Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation: Focus on research/CIBC Run for the Cure – Breast Cancer Society of Canada Focus on research funding for diagnosis, treatment and prevention – Willow Breast Cancer Support: Focus on information and support services – Rethink Breast Cancer Focus on young women
    46. 46. March 9th , 2011
    47. 47. March 18th , 2011
    48. 48. May 12th , 2011
    49. 49. Advocacy Through Media
    50. 50. Advocacy Through Media
    51. 51. There is a big difference between knowing your subject, and knowing your message.
    52. 52. What is a Key Message? • A simple, compelling, enduring perception that influences stakeholders and enhances your objectives. • What you want the media to report • Short, memorable information points about your topic • Descriptive, vivid • Delivered with personality • Succinct, quotable • Newsworthy, credible and in context
    53. 53. The Value of Key Messages • Allow members of an organization to speak from the same page • Allows you to stay focused in your meetings/communications with government/media • Provides a solid base from which to bridge effectively on other issues • Demonstrate leadership since you will be articulate, consistent and supported by evidence
    54. 54. Developing Key Messages 1. What-Identify your issue •Focus on the things that you are concerned about and want to see changed. •Take a position or stand. 2. Why - Explain the issue •Write out three key messages that explain your issue and your concerns in clear language. •Your key messages must be brief, easy to remember ,simple, true and provable. •Rehearse your key messages, as they will form the basis for all written and verbal communication with decision-makers, other advocates and the media.
    55. 55. Developing Key Messages 3. Who-Deliver your message to the right people •Your issue will determine who to target-either government or media 4. When- Deliver your message at the right time •A prime time to deliver your message is when the issue appears in the media •Also when decision-making authorities change •Election periods good way to secure commitments from candidates
    56. 56. Establishing an Interview 1. Are you on deadline? What is your deadline? 2. What are you looking for from me/us? 3. Who else have you talked to? 4. Is there a news event driving this? 5. Is there another time to speak? 6. What’s the best time to reach you 7. When do you hope this will appear? 8. Why don’t you ask me…? 9. What are you taking away from this? 10.Where will this appear?
    57. 57. Interview Guidelines  Keep it short  Answer the question and then stop  Use your message wisely, not too well  You don’t need to have all the answers  Respond don’t react to questions  Get to the point  Avoid filler words  Tell the truth  Nothing is off the record  Give positive answers to negative questions  Avoid “no comment” answers
    58. 58. The Unprepared Interviewer: May have vague questions or require you to provide a lot of background before you can get to your key message. Reporter Interview Techniques The Response: Steer the interview in the direction you want to go. Rephrase the question to make it more specific. "By your question, I think you’re referring to...let me put that in perspective."
    59. 59. The Machine Gunner. Asks so many questions that you don’t know which one to answer first. Reporter Interview Techniques The Response: “You’ve asked many interesting questions. First I’d like to address, …”
    60. 60. The Interrupter Jumps in before you’ve had a chance to complete your response. Reporter Interview Techniques The Response: Let him complete the interruption, then say: "Before I answer that, I’d like to complete my thought."
    61. 61. The Paraphraser: Tries to put words in your mouth May ask hypothetical questions Often inaccurate in conclusions Reporter Interview Techniques The Response: “No, that isn’t what I said. What I said was..." and repeat your point.
    62. 62. The Expert: Usually well-informed Knowledgeable and respectful Asks well conceived questions Usually a pleasant interview Reporter Interview Techniques
    63. 63. The “Either/Or” question The “Negative” question The “Absent Party” question The “Ambush” The “False Statement” The “Hypothetical” Question Traps
    64. 64. Media Lessons Sarah Palin Talks Bailout Proposal.flv
    65. 65. 14 year old girl picks fight with bully TV host - and WINS_.flv Media Lessons
    66. 66. You DO have the right to: •Know the topic, participants and format •Know if the interview will be live/taped •Know if the interview will be edited or used in its entirety •Expect fairness Media Techniques You do NOT have the right to: •Know the questions in advance •See story in advance •Change your quotes or edit the story •Expect your view to be the only presented
    67. 67. Social Media 101 The Fundamentals of Facebook and Twitter
    68. 68. What is Facebook? A social networking website that allows users to connect with others by sharing photos, videos, messages and keeps you in touch with friends and family
    69. 69. Facebook Terminology • News Feed • Status Update • Wall • Tagging • Share • Like
    70. 70. News Feed The news feed is your Facebook home page, and the first thing you see when you sign on to Facebook. It gives you regular updates from the friends you follow and connect with.
    71. 71. Status Update Allows users to quickly update their friends on their lives or share news and information. People can attach pictures, videos and links and tag their friends in their updates.
    72. 72. Facebook Wall A space on a user’s profile that allows their friends to post information. It is different from a private message in that allows all of your friends to see the message. A private message is solely between certain individuals and is not made public to the rest of your friends.
    73. 73. Tagging A tag can be attached to any update that you post, whether it be a simple status update or a photo you have posted. It links a person, a page, or a place (Geotagging, or “Checking in”) to your update.
    74. 74. Share Facebook allows people to share content that others have previously posted. If someone posts information that you think is relevant to the rest of your friends or followers, you are able to share this post with them.
    75. 75. Like All updates have a “like” button attached allowing you to easily notify the author that you enjoyed their post.
    76. 76. What is a Facebook Page? A public profile that allows people or businesses to promote a specific product or cause and interact with its fans/customers.
    77. 77. Why create a Page? • It’s public! • Helps keep your private life private! • Facebook Insights • Newsfeed Marketing
    78. 78. What is Twitter? A social networking site that allows its users to share short messages (called ‘Tweets’) in 140 characters or less
    79. 79. Twitter Terminology • Followers vs. Following • Hashtags – Ex. #BreastCancer, #bcsm • @Mentions vs. @Replies • Retweet • Notifications Page • Discovery Page
    80. 80. Followers vs. Following A follower is a user who subscribes to your tweets. Following refers to the users you subscribe to. *Typically a user wants to have a higher number of followers compared to the number of users they are following.
    81. 81. Hashtags Used with the # prefix, a hashtag is used to group topics. It has become a popular means of campaigning and spreading awareness on certain topics and causes.
    82. 82. @Mentions vs. @Replies A Mention is a tweet that incorporates another twitter user into the body of your tweet. Replies are used in response to tweets. By clicking on the “reply” button underneath a tweet you are able to directly comment and contribute to the conversation. The user’s @username will be included at the very start of the tweet.
    83. 83. Retweet Retweet: A re-posting of someone else’s tweet.
    84. 84. Notification Page Monitors all activity associated with your twitter account. It tracks who has recently followed, mentioned, or retweeted you.
    85. 85. Discovery Page A filtered News Feed that expands tweets to include the graphic or summary of an article that is posted. It is tailored to you and is based on your followers and content that you tweet about.
    86. 86. Why use Twitter? • Micro-blogging • Networking • Hashtags • *Twitter is live!
    87. 87. Find CBCN on Social Media! You can connect with CBCN by following us on: @cbcn Canadian Breast Cancer Network @cbcnetwork Canadian Breast Ca
    88. 88. Advocacy With Impact: Social Media and Advocacy
    89. 89. Why Use Social Media for Advocacy? Advantages of social media include: •Low/No cost for set-up •Potential wide reach •Quick/instantaneous response and sharing of messages •New opportunities to listen, engage and monitor your progress.
    90. 90. Value of Social Media Advocacy • To spread the word • To mobilize forces • To manage event registrations • To raise funds • To network with like minded groups • To take action • To engage and convene discussion
    91. 91. How to Use Social Media 1. Create a brief strategic review 2. Sign up for social media accounts 3. Become familiar with the tools 4. Develop systems for managing your advocacy efforts 5. Monitor your efforts and tweak as needed
    92. 92. Social Media Tactics • Online petitions • Facebook pages • Blog posts/guest blogging • Following experts/authorities • Hosting twitter parties • Using hashtags • Outreach to decision-makers/reporters • Calls to action
    93. 93. Social Media Exercise • Share your personal journey Facebook/Blog • Quickly voice your thoughts/opinions on a specific issue Twitter/Facebook • Coordinating an event Facebook • Promoting/Marketing an event Facebook/Twitter • Creating discussion around an issue Facebook/Blog • Quickly mobilizing for action Twitter/FB • Disseminating information quickly Twitter/FB/Blog
    94. 94. Discussion Review True/False
    95. 95. True or False? Only those with the appropriate training and skills can do advocacy work?
    96. 96. True or False? Advocacy is about building relationships?
    97. 97. True or False? Provincial governments are responsible for drug reimbursements
    98. 98. True or False? Only those with the appropriate training and skills can do advocacy work?
    99. 99. True or False? The only decision-makers worth speaking to are those currently in government.
    100. 100. True or False? You need to be on every single social networking site.
    101. 101. True or False? Too many Facebook posts can have a negative effect on your followers
    102. 102. True or False? You can’t expect fairness from the media.

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