Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Teaching 19th Century American Literature in the High School Classroom

5,837 views

Published on

Slides for a talk on teaching 19th Century American literature in the High School classroom.

Published in: Education
  • Login to see the comments

Teaching 19th Century American Literature in the High School Classroom

  1. 1. A M E R I C A N L I T E R AT U R E I N T H E H I G H S C H O O L C L A S S R O O M 1 9 T H C E N T U RY @ccareylit craigcarey.net
  2. 2. – Y O U R AV E R A G E H I G H S C H O O L S T U D E N T “What does it mean?”
  3. 3. T H E H E R M E N E U T I C T R A D I T I O N R E A D I N G A N D I N T E R P R E TA T I O N
  4. 4. T H E G R O U N D O F L A N G U A G E 1.Words are signs of natural facts. 2.Particular natural facts are symbols of particular spiritual facts. 3.Nature is the symbol of spirit. A C C O R D I N G T O E M E R S O N
  5. 5. T H E R O M A N C E S E A R C H I N G F O R
  6. 6. – H E R M A N M E LV I L L E , M O B Y D I C K “If they but knew it, almost all men in their degree, some time or other, cherish very nearly the same feelings towards the ocean with me.”
  7. 7. – D . H . L A W R E N C E “To leave, to leave, to escape … to cross the horizon, enter into another life … It is thus that Melville finds himself in the middle of the Pacific. He has really crossed the line of the horizon.”
  8. 8. – G I L L E S D E L E U Z E “American literature is a process of experimentation. They have killed interpretation.”
  9. 9. – G E R T R U D E S T E I N “Think of anything, of cowboys, of movies, of detective stories, of anybody who goes anywhere or stays at home and is an American and you will realize that it is something strictly American to conceive a space that is filled with moving.”
  10. 10. - C H A R L E S O L S O N “I take SPACE to be the central fact to man born in America, from Folsom cave to now. I spell it large because it comes large here. Large, and without mercy.”
  11. 11. Space and Slavery
  12. 12. W R I T I N G S PA C E S
  13. 13. – M A R K T WA I N “The Mississippi River will always have its own way; no engineering skill can persuade it to do otherwise…"
  14. 14. “But this thing has knocked the romance out of piloting, to a large extent. It and some other things together, have knocked all the romance out of it.” M A R K T WA I N
  15. 15. T H E O RY WA R S T E X T A N D T H E O RY
  16. 16. C A N O N WA R S T E X T A N D I D E O L O G Y
  17. 17. T H E C U LT U R A L & H I S T O R I C A L T U R N T E X T A N D C O N T E X T
  18. 18. T H E M AT E R I A L & T E C H N I C A L T U R N T E X T A N D T E C H N E
  19. 19. – J A C Q U E S D E R R I D A “By carrying us beyond paper, the adventures of technology grant us a sort of future anterior; they liberate our reading for a retrospective exploration of the past resources of paper, for its previously multimedia vectors.”
  20. 20. P R I N T I N C O M PA R AT I V E C O N T E X T Comparative Textual Media
  21. 21. “Media always already yield ghost phenomena.” Friedrich Kittler
  22. 22. M A G I C , M A R K S , A N D M A R K U P L I T E R A RY E F F E C T S
  23. 23. “[it was ] a riddle which (so evanescent are the fashions of the world in these particulars) I saw little hope of solving. And yet it strangely interested me. My eyes fastened themselves upon the old scarlet letter, and would not be turned aside. Certainly, there was some deep meaning in it, most worthy of interpretation, and which, as it were, streamed forth from the mystic symbol, subtly communicating itself to my sensibilities, but evading the analysis of my mind.”
  24. 24. “But the object that most drew my attention, in the mysterious package, was a certain affair of fine red cloth, much worn and faded. There were traces about it of gold embroidery, which, however, was greatly frayed and defaced; so that none, or very little, of the glitter was left. It had been wrought, as was easy to perceive, with wonderful skill of needlework; and the stitch (as I am assured by ladies conversant with such mysteries) gives evidence of a now forgotten art, not to be recovered even by the process of picking out the threads. This rag of scarlet cloth,—for time, and wear, and a sacrilegious moth, had reduced it to little other than a rag,—on careful examination, assumed the shape of a letter. It was the capital letter A.”
  25. 25. By an accurate measurement, each limb proved to be precisely three inches and a quarter in length. It had been intended, there could be no doubt, as an ornamental article of dress; but how it was to be worn, or what rank, honor, and dignity, in by-past times, were signified by it, was a riddle which (so evanescent are the fashions of the world in these particulars) I saw little hope of solving. And yet it strangely interested me. My eyes fastened themselves upon the old scarlet letter, and would not be turned aside. Certainly, there was some deep meaning in it, most worthy of interpretation, and which, as it were, streamed forth from the mystic symbol, subtly communicating itself to my sensibilities, but evading the analysis of my mind.”
  26. 26. “Seal, n. A mark impressed upon certain kinds of documents to attest their authenticity and authority. Sometimes it is stamped upon wax, and attached to the paper, sometimes into the paper itself. Sealing, in this sense, is a survival of an ancient custom of inscribing important papers with cabalistic words or signs to give them a magical efficacy independent of the authority that they represent.” - Ambrose Bierce
  27. 27. L I T B Y L E T T E R S Literature •from Latin literatura/litteratura "learning, a writing, grammar.” •"writing formed with letters," from litera/littera "letter"
  28. 28. Scale Matters T H E M E D I U M I S T H E M E S S A G E H O W Y O U S E E C O N D I T I O N S W H A T Y O U S E E
  29. 29. scales in flux
  30. 30. – J O H N S E E LY B R O W N “Technologies are curiosity amplifiers.”
  31. 31. New Archives
  32. 32. New Images
  33. 33. New Evidence
  34. 34. New Styles
  35. 35. New Lenses
  36. 36. How does it mean? Why does it matter?
  37. 37. D I G I TA L T O O L S Tools for writing and peer-review • Google Documents • Draft Tools for word analysis • Wordle • Prism • Google Ngram Viewer • Wordnik Tools for presentations and slides • Canva • Haiku Deck
  38. 38. • Emily Dickinson Archive • Emily Dickinson Electronic Archives • Emily Dickinson Collections • Digital Thoreau • F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Ledger: 1919–1938 • The Ambrose Bierce Project • The Charles Chesnutt Digital Archive • Digital Emerson • Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore • The Thomas Edison Papers • Du Bois Central: W.E.B. Du Bois Online • The Willa Cather Archive • William James: Life is in the Transitions • The Writings of James Fenimore Cooper • Paul Laurence Dunbar Homepage • Benjamin Franklin: In His Own Words • The Papers of Benjamin Franklin • Uncle Tom's Cabin: A Multi-Media Archive • Charles Brockden Brown: Electronic Archive • Melville's Marginalia Online • The Life and Works of Herman Melville • Looking for Whitman • The Walt Whitman Archive • Mark Twain Project Online • Mark Twain in His Times • Common-place (American Antiquarian Society) • Harlem Renaissance Resources • Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade • The Atlantic Slave Trade: A Visual Record • Blackface Minstrelsy, 1830-1852 • Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers • Our Americas Archive Partnership • America's Historical Newspapers • America's Historical Imprints • American Memory from the Library of Congress • The American Verse Project • Early Americas Digital Archive • Making of America Collection (Cornell) • Making of America Journals (Michigan) • Modernist Journals Project • The Nineteenth Century in Print • Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers • NINES: Nineteenth-Century Scholarship Online • Documenting the American South • Witness to the Early American Experience • Our Americas Archive Partnership • African American Women Writers of 19th Century • Modern American Poetry • The Vault at Pfaff's • Emergence of Advertising in America, 1850-1920 O N L I N E A R C H I V E S R E L AT E D T O 1 9 T H C E N T U RY A M E R I C A N L I T E R AT U R E A N D C U LT U R E
  39. 39. This slideshow by Craig Carey is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial- ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

×