May 2010 Fesc Overview

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May 2010 Fesc Overview

  1. 1. Florida Energy Systems Consortium Overview Presentation www.floridaenergy.ufl.edu
  2. 2. Outline • Who We Are • Research Strategy Programs & Infrastructure Strategy, • Industrial Collaboration, Economic Impact, and Technology Commercialization • New program Development • Education and Outreach • Summary
  3. 3. Legislative Mandate and Vision • Legislative Mandate – Promote collaboration among experts in the SUS for the g p purposes of sharing energy-related expertise and assisting in the development and implementation of a comprehensive, long-term, environmentally compatible, sustainable, and efficient energy strategic plan for the state state. – Focus on the research and development of innovative energy systems that will lead to alternative energy strategies, improved energy efficiencies, and expanded economic development for the state. – Develop education and outreach programs to prepare a qualified energy workforce and informed public. • Focus on college-level degrees, technician training, and public and commercial sectors awareness.
  4. 4. Leadership Structure Oversight Board University Research VP’s VP s Director Advisory Board Tim Anderson Steering Committee Industry Collaboration & Tech Education & Outreach Commercialization Principal Investigators Program Development FESC Systems Goals
  5. 5. Leadership Team Tim Anderson; Director – Experienced administrator - UF College of Engineering Associate Dean for Research & Graduate Programs; Director of SUCCEED NSF Engineering g ; g g Education Coalition – 204 refereed publications & 301 conference presentations. – Distinguished Professor at UF, Elected Fellow of the ASEE and the AIChE. Canan Balaban; Associate Director of Director of Industrial Collaboration & Commercialization – 25 years in industry as a research scientist, engineer, & manager in rechargeable batteries, bi b tt i bio-mass, coal d l desulfurization / gasification, sol-gel t h & sintering lf i ti ifi ti l l tech, i t i – Managed $10M NASA funded Hydrogen Research Program & assisted in establishment of the Energy Technology Incubator - Center of Excellence. – Associate Director of Florida Institute for Sustainable Energy.
  6. 6. Oversight and Guidance • Oversight Board – Vice President for Research or other representative appointed by each university president – Responsible for technical performance & financial management • Advisory Board – Facilitates collaboration with industry and other parties – Ensures input from the external stakeholders p • Steering Committee – Provides guidance on vision and direction to the Director g – Facilitates communication with each member university – Recommends future efforts of FESC – Conducts comprehensive performance evaluation and accountability measurement and assessment. t bilit t d t
  7. 7. Steering Committee Dr. Camille E. Coley; Assistant Vice Dr. Yogi Goswami; John and Naida Ramil President; Interim Director of Professor, College of Engineering, Sponsored Research; Associate p ; University of South Florida Director of the Center for Ocean Energy Technology; Florida Atlantic Dr. George Philippidis; Associate University Director, Applied Research Center, Florida International University Dr. David Block; Director Emeritus and Professor of Engineering, Florida Solar Dr. David Norton; Associate Dean of Energy Center, University of Central Research and Graduate Programs Florida/FSEC Professor, Materials Science and , Engineering, College of Engineering, Dr. David Cartes; Interim Director, University of Florida Institute for Energy Systems, Economics and Sustainability;y; Dr. Nassar Kutkut; Ph.D., MBA ; , Associate Director, Center for Director, UCF Florida Energy Systems Advanced Power Systems; Associate Consortium Center Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering; Florida State University g g; y
  8. 8. Advisory Board Institution  Representative  Florida Crystals Corp.  Florida Crystals Corp Gustavo Cepero, Vice President  Gustavo Cepero Vice President FPL  Buck Martinez, Sr. Director of Project Development  Holland & Knight, LLP  Tommy Boroughs, Partner  Milcom Venture Partners  Chris Fountas, Partner  Ocean Renewable Power  Christopher Sauer, President & CEO  Orlando Utilities Comm.  Byron Knibbs, VP Sustainable Services Pratt & Whitney Randy C. Parsley, Director, Global Program Development Progress Energy  Rob Caldwell, VP Efficiency & Innovative Tech.  Scripps Research Inst.  Scripps Research Inst Roy Periana, Director Scripps Energy Laboratories  Ro Periana Director Scripps Energ Laboratories Siemens Power  Frank Bevc, Director Technology Policy  SUS Board of Governors  Sheila McDevitt, Chair  TECO  Greg Ramon, Director Regulatory Policy & Compl. 
  9. 9. Florida Renewable Energy Potential by 2020 Source: Navigant Consulting; Florida Renewable Energy Potential Assessment; 2009
  10. 10. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources • Securing our Energy Storage and Delivery Infrastructure I f t t • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation
  11. 11. Strategic Approach: Energy Systems
  12. 12. Integrated PV/Battery/Lighting Module Objectives • I t Integrating a transparent ti t t Sun light organic PV device, lithium ion Top transparent  batteries and organic light electrode emitting device into a solar solar- PV absorbing  PV powered lighting panel layer PV electrode PV l t d • Development of both organic D l t f b th i OLED PV cells and organic LEDs with transparent electrodes ITO layer ITO layer Transparent  Batteries • Development of high substrate volumetric energy density White light g lithium lithi m batteries F. So, S. Meng and J. Xue, UF
  13. 13. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources - Florida s Production of liquid fuels & other chemical intermediates (cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel) & gaseous fuels & feed stocks (gasification, anaerobic digestion), efficient (g , g ), conversion of biofuels to electric power (SOFCs, turbines), energy intensive crops, solid waste as a biomass resource • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources • Securing our Energy Storage and Delivery Infrastructure • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation
  14. 14. Developing Florida Biomass Resources • Florida has ~7% of US biomass resources 15 million acres of forest land • 53% statewide tree 10 million acres of farm land coverage • #1 • in sugarcane and citrus # 1 in forest residues • Florida Ethanol Potential • • # 1 in urban wood waste # 2 in vegetable (waste) – Current: 2-3B gallons/yr – Future: 5B+ g 5 gallons/yr /y
  15. 15. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources Florida s • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources - Photovoltaics, solar concentrators (fuel production, , ( p , gasification), outreach and education in broad solar technologies • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources • Securing our Energy Storage and Delivery Infrastructure • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation
  16. 16. Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources Sunshine State has more than twice the solar resources of the world’s leading PV market world s
  17. 17. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources p g • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida - Nuclear and electric power workforce training, partnerships with i d kf i i hi i h industry i in critical research needs, power systems, power electronics & conditioning, carbon sequestration g, q • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources • Securing our Energy Storage and Delivery Infrastructure g gy g y • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation
  18. 18. Carbon Capture and Sequestration Projects Geological Sequestration: Cedar Keys/Lawson F K /L Formation (deep ti (d saline aquifer Optimize: Transportation, Energy Consumption, and Land Use Total Soil Organic Carbon Stock 2.26 2 26 giga ton FL CO2 Production 0.26 giga ton/yr
  19. 19. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources Florida s • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy p g gy Resources – Ocean and thermal differential energy harvesting • S Securing our E i Energy St Storage and D li d Delivery I f t t Infrastructure • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation
  20. 20. Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources • Harness ocean currents & thermal gradients • Develop, fabricate & deploy 20 kW underwater turbine Verdant Power Deliverables • 10-year program potential is as much as 5 GW of capacity generated from the Gulf Stream and up to 2 GW of equivalent cold-water-based AC p q • Estimated 10,000 engineering / tech. jobs • http://oceancurrents.rsmas.miami.edu/ • New high-tech Florida-based sector
  21. 21. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida g • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources • Securing our Energy Storage and Delivery Infrastructure - Transmission & distrib tion distribution, grid reliability and resiliency, continuous energy delivery, integrated renewable systems, customer owned microgrids, power quality, t d i id lit energy storage, location aware systems, and efficiencyy • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation
  22. 22. FRCC Region
  23. 23. Strategic Research Thrusts • Overarching - Understanding Florida’s Energy Systems • Developing Florida's Biomass Resources Florida s • Harnessing Florida's Solar Resources • Ensuring Nuclear Energy & Carbon Constrained Technologies for Electric Power in Florida • Exploiting Florida’s Ocean Energy Resources p g gy • Securing our Energy Storage and Delivery Infrastructure • Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation - Improvement of existing & new building efficiency, industry energy auditing & efficiency, efficiency outreach & education education.
  24. 24. Enhancing Energy Efficiency & Conservation • In the U. S., buildings account for 39% of our primary energy use and 72% of our electrical use. • 2008 Florida Energy Act calls for new homes to use only 50% of 2007 code minimum within 10 years • Home retrofits must also be addressed – existing stock outnumbers new homes by 50 to 1 1. • Demonstration homes at multiple campuses - UCF, UF, FSU, USF, FIU, UWF: Used for research, training, outreach. outreach Efficiency First $1800 at $0.12/kW h $2400 at $0.12/kW h $ 34
  25. 25. Industrial Collaboration Goals • Industry involvement in planning & execution of research, education & technology commercialization programs • Active collaboration among faculty & industry partners from conceptual stages of research, education, & outreach programs • Relevant information provided to industrial academic and government industrial, academic, partners in a timely fashion • Facilitation of networking among academic, government, and industrial partners for pre-competitive research pre competitive • Education of a new breed of student leaders for industrial employment in myriad energy fields • Strong commercialization programs that foster industrial collaboration & deliver a pipeline of energy technologies for commercialization
  26. 26. Potential Industrial Partner Roles Leveraging Research Assets – Technology licensing – Industry sponsored research – Joint research – Facility usage agreements – Technology donations Leveraging Researcher Assets – Industrial Advisory Board – Faculty sabbaticals Leveraging Educational Assets – Faculty consulting – Student internships & co-ops – Visiting industry researchers – Publications – Alumni Networks Leveraging Student Assets – Distance education – Proactive student recruitment – Lifelong learning – Student internships and co-ops – Short courses, seminars – Student scholarships
  27. 27. Industrial Collaboration Key Elements • Highly involved Advisory Board – Utilities, entrepreneurs, investors; MNC’s, SME’s, incubator / research park managers i b t h k • Energy Summit – Highlight Florida university energy research, education, & outreach programs – Guidance from industry & academic leaders • Focus on large block funded grants in collaboration with Florida industry • Energy industry database segmented by RE areas
  28. 28. Industrial Collaboration & Technology Commercialization Key Partnerships • SUS Technology Transfer Directors – Currently structuring energy technology marketing and commercialization program • Florida Research Consortium – High level and broad industrial guidance • Florida Institute for Commercialization of Public Research - Support development & funding of energy startup companies from technologies to entrepreneurs & investors. • Florida High Tech Corridor – Central Florida economic development community; Private sector impact. Workforce development. Matching grants research program funds. • Florida Incubator and Research Park Ecosystem – Energy company spin-outs • National Partnerships
  29. 29. Key Activities – Tech Commercialization • Two Tiered Model – Early vetting of technologies for path to market – Proven model for spawning long-term collaborative R&D – Engage industry in development process in the university – Provides 2X leveraging of FESC funds on each project – Natural pipeline of technology deployment to private sector • Early Stage Market Research / Business Plans – Fund y g up to 15 business plans or market research studies at $7.5k each for FESC funded later stage technologies. • Matching Funds R&D Program – Up to $50k / project for 5 later stage projects with a 2:1 industry match
  30. 30. Education – Focus on Workforce Development • Three Focus Areas – Community College Training • AS degree • Certificate Program – Nuclear Engineering Education – Masters Level Education • Close integration with Outreach and Industrial Collaboration • Program implementation with Florida Advanced Technological g p g Education Center (FLATE). Mission elements: – Create State-wide technician educational delivery system – Provide curriculum development, best practice demonstrations, student involvement and outreach activities necessary to meet the workforce capacity in target sectors
  31. 31. Outreach – Focus on Energy Efficiency • Targets the general public & built environment • Utilizes Florida’s extension education system and FESC partners • Collaborates with the home builders and construction industry • Create an online compendium of current, accurate publications • Develop / conduct technical & continuing education programs • Produce public service pieces (NPR PBS public access ) (NPR, PBS, access…) • Partner with utilities to implement performance-based demand side management programs • Work with “green” certification (FGBC, USGBC, GBI…)
  32. 32. Web Site: www.FloridaEnergy.ufl.edu
  33. 33. New Program Development Goal: Significantly impact energy-related research, education, and outreach programs within the SUS , p g Strategies • P id exploratory research f di Provide l t h funding • Facilitate competitive responses to solicitations • Serve as communications hub • Initiate larger-scale, longer-time planning
  34. 34. New Program Development • More than 130 funding opportunities from various agencies distributed to faculty. • Competitive Contracts & Grants: 11/1/08-9/30/09 252 Applications with $357M total request 419 Awards in the amount: $97M Major Proposal Examples: j – Participated in $122M Sun Fuel Hub, $129M Building Efficiency Hub, and $122M Nuclear Hub Proposal – 36 White Papers developed f ARRA Whit P d l d for – Current efforts: Energy security, PV manufacturing
  35. 35. New Program Development • White Papers for ARRA Projects: 36 White Papers Total ( WP in Demonstration) p (10 ) – Energy Efficiency (3 WP) – Biomass, Biofuels, Energy Crops, LCA (10 WP) – PV Solar Thermal CSP (9) PV, Thermal, CSP, – Carbon Sequestration (1 WP) – Ocean Energy (1 WP) – Smart Grid, Energy Storage , Power (6 WP) – Energy Security (1 WP) – Wind (2 WP) ( ) – Education & Workforce (3 WP)
  36. 36. New Program Development • Faculty teams to respond to competitive calls – Battery Team meeting 5/5/09 (24 members) – Algae Team meeting 6/3/09 (25 Members) – Small Molecule Chemistry & Energy Team 6/15/09 (20 members) – PV Team meeting, 9/21/09 (30 members) – Team meetings at Sept 2009 FESC summit (above mentioned t teams and t d teams i S l Th in Solar-Thermal, Bi l Biomass, C b C t Carbon Capture, Efficiency, Energy Delivery, Ocean Energy)
  37. 37. FESC: Impacting the Florida Economy • Take Systems Approach – Leverages component research – C Connects research t commercial product t h to i l d t • Provide Objective Policy Guidance – C t market pull Create k t ll • Improve Climate for Energy Industry – B tt prepared workforce Better d kf – Accessible research enterprise • Facilitate Technology Transfer • Enhance Energy Efficiency
  38. 38. Why Florida Should Lead in Sustainable Energy It has the most to lose if we don t don’t Source: NASA -Melting of West Antarctica or Greenland ice sheet

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