New Media, Trust, PR

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New Media, Trust, PR

  1. 1. Web 2.0: Building Consumer Trust What should corporate communications do about the social media
  2. 2. Web 2.0: Building Consumer Trust and Killing PR? What should corporate communications do about the social media
  3. 3. The Platypus Case To many people, the platypus is a proof that God has a sense of humour
  4. 4. The Platypus Case To many people, the platypus is a proof that God has a sense of humour To Russian bloggers, it is a second name for bad PR in the blogosphere
  5. 5. The Platypus Case (continued) Decemb er 2008
  6. 6. The Platypus Case (still continuing) • ‘Utkonos’ (platypus) has become the internet slang for poorly disguised advertising on the Russian blogs. • This ploy has brought the chain under scrutiny, and all of its drawbacks are cheerfully discussed on blogs (with its overall image being quite poor now).
  7. 7. Where has it all gone wrong?
  8. 8. What is Web 2.0 from a PR point of view?
  9. 9. What essentially is Web 2.0? • Networking (vs. broadcasting) • Users (vs. publishers) • Collaboration & participation (vs. consumption)
  10. 10. What does this mean for the media • Instant dissemination of information • Multiple angles to every story • 360° scrutiny on coverage • Real competition to conventional media
  11. 11. Enter New Media
  12. 12. How does the new media compare with the old? Conventional Media New Media • Big audiences • Segmented audiences • General topics • Narrow topics • ‘Industrial scale’ • Customised publishing publishing • Hobby • Professional
  13. 13. How does the new media compare with the old? Conventional Media New Media • Big audiences • Segmented audiences • General topics • Narrow topics • ‘Industrial scale’ • Customised publishing Sells audiences publishing • Hobby to advertisers • Professional
  14. 14. How does the new media compare with the old? Conventional Media New Media • Big audiences • Segmented audiences • General topics • Narrow topics • ‘Industrial scale’ • Exchanges Customised publishing Sells audiences publishing • Hobby content with to advertisers • Professional peers
  15. 15. How does new media compete with the old? • Hardly any blog can really compete with any major traditional news outlet in the long run. • Not that it needs to… • Aggregation services and social bookmarking give everyone easy access to audiences bigger than one would expect
  16. 16. How does new media compete with the old? • Hardly any blog can really compete with any major traditional news outlet in the long run. • Not that it needs to… • Aggregation services and social bookmarking give everyone easy access to audiences bigger than one would expect
  17. 17. What about trust? We need to trust our sources of information to a certain degree Conventional Media New Media • Based on our knowledge of • Based on our emotional link procedures and practices in to the writer the media. • Inseparable from our trust Institutional • Separated from our trust for particular writer Personal Trust for personalities Trust • Centralised • Decentralised
  18. 18. What about trust? We need to trust our sources of information to a certain degree Conventional Media New Media • Based on our knowledge of • Based on our emotional link procedures and practices in to the writer the media. • Inseparable from our trust • Separated from our trust for particular writer Personal Trust for personalities • Decentralised • Centralised
  19. 19. What about trust? We need to trust our sources of information to a certain degree Conventional Media New Media • Based on our knowledge of • Based on our emotional link procedures and practices in to the writer the media. • Inseparable from our trust • Separated from our trust for for personalities particular writer • Decentralised • Centralised
  20. 20. Trust 2.0 • End of authority, expertise and certification • Availability and exposure to peer opinion • Small world networks are becoming ‘big’ • Availability of alternative sources and background info
  21. 21. Trust 2.0 • End of authority, expertise and certification • Availability and exposure to peer opinion • Small world networks are becoming ‘big’ • Availability of alternative sources and background info
  22. 22. Social Media & Trust • Utilises existing ties • Builds new links • Facilitates exchange • Creates new knowledge • Makes access to information easy and efficient
  23. 23. Social Media & Trust • Utilises existing ties • Builds new links • Facilitates exchange • Creates new knowledge • Makes access to information easy and efficient Web 2.0 and & the social media generate trust
  24. 24. How does Trust 2.0 work?
  25. 25. How does Trust 2.0 work? Shared media, Hosted media
  26. 26. How does Trust 2.0 work? Shared media, Hosted media Joint projects carried out by online communities (Wikipedia)
  27. 27. How does Trust 2.0 work? Communities & Social Networks that plan ‘offline’ activities Shared media, (charity) Hosted media Joint projects carried out by online communities (Wikipedia)
  28. 28. What about trust? Trust 1.0 Trust 2.0 Advertising, product PR, marketing communications
  29. 29. What about trust? Trust 1.0 Trust 2.0 Advertising, product PR, marketing communications
  30. 30. What about trust? Trust 1.0 Trust 2.0 Advertising, product PR, marketing communications
  31. 31. Dante’s Inferno • Dante’s Inferno distinguishes between the two types of trust when punishing the fraudulent ones. • So do social media: hidden advertising may be a part of the media, but not of peer-to-peer relations
  32. 32. So what was wrong with Platypus? An old-fashioned attempt to ‘exploit’ personal trust in the way you would use the institutional one
  33. 33. Old-school PR • No trust involved • Authority assumed • Audience is passive • No feedback expected
  34. 34. Old-school PR • No trust involved • Authority assumed • Audience is passive • No feedback expected Leading the blind
  35. 35. Why is new media ‘dangerous’ for PR?
  36. 36. The End of Spin • PR used to rely on a scarcity of channels and an ability to impose its own ‘spin’ through these channels. • With channels multiplying, our ability to impose spin becomes pretty limited.
  37. 37. The End of Spin • PR used to rely on a scarcity of channels and an ability to impose its own ‘spin’ through these channels. • With channels multiplying, our ability to impose spin becomes pretty limited.
  38. 38. • Public Relations have virtually turned into Media Relations, since the media used to be the most obvious and cost-effective way to reach your audiences. • It no longer is… • PR has to adapt and meet ‘the public’ Press-relations Events Social Media Relations
  39. 39. • Public Relations have virtually turned into Media Relations, since the media used to be the most obvious and cost-effective way to reach your audiences. • It no longer is… • PR has to adapt and meet ‘the public’ Press-relations Events Social Media Relations
  40. 40. What can be done?
  41. 41. Web 2.0 ‘Merits’ • Create • Quote • Share • Link back • Connect • Comment • Collaborate • Participate
  42. 42. Web 2.0 ‘Merits’ • Create • Quote • Share • Link back • Connect • Comment • Collaborate • Participate What can we do with them?
  43. 43. Public Relations 2.0 • Engage audience • Build communities • Expect and inspire feedback
  44. 44. Public Relations 2.0 • Engage audience • Build communities • Expect and inspire feedback Deal with people, not with the media
  45. 45. Social Media Rules
  46. 46. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring
  47. 47. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant
  48. 48. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience
  49. 49. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience • Give them content
  50. 50. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience • Give them content • Give them voice
  51. 51. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience • Give them content • Give them voice • Listen to them
  52. 52. In other words • You can always find an interested audience • You never know what will be BIG tomorrow • Public services can be better than your website • Make sure you participate • Make sure you interact, not broadcast • Learn from your audience
  53. 53. Bring Wispa back • Chocolate bars that are no longer on sale are not a story • Even a new chocolate bar is not a story BUT • Every newspaper wrote about re-launch od Wispa after thousands of people demanded Wispa back in blogs and social networks
  54. 54. ZaZhelezo [‘about hardware’] • Data-centres are boring • The media does not cover every step of a project • IT people don’t trust advertising BUT • A community blog about the launch of Troyka- Dialog’s new data-centre has become one of the most successful blogging PR projects.
  55. 55. Press Club • Journalists don’t trust PR people • Journalists like to keep their blogs private BUT • The Telecom Press community, built by Beeline, has become the biggest media-club in the industry.
  56. 56. So is Web 2.0 the death of PR?
  57. 57. Yes, if you don’t change
  58. 58. No, if you really ‘ride’ the wave
  59. 59. But be careful what you ride
  60. 60. Thank you! arseniy.rastorguev@mmdcee.com www.mmdcee.com www.mmdblog.com

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