Region 8 eastern visayas

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Region 8 eastern visayas

  1. 1. Some facts:1. Leyte had the highest number of farms in 20022. COCONUT is the dominant permanent crop3. PALAY is the major temporary crop4. Chicken and hog raising dominates the poultry and livestock raising activity, respectively.5. Importance of communal system of irrigation
  2. 2. Implications:• From 2002 up to 2008, there has been a continuous increase in the production of palay.• However, a negative growth rate of value production in crops (at constant prices), -0.15 has been recorded by the NSCB in 2010.
  3. 3. Agricultural Situation as of June, 2011: 1. Crops: - Some areas in the southern part of the region barely recovered from the previous quarters flooding (Bebeng, Chedeng, Egay, Falcon) - unrepaired irrigation systems 2. Livestock and Poultry: - Still relying on supplies from other regions - Artificial insemination of cattle, hog and carabao in the south-western part of the region 3. Fisheries: - Prices of fishery and marine products were higher than normal due to limited supply and local importation. 4. Infrastructure Development, Programs, Policies and Government Interventions - A newly constructed wet and dry market in Bato, Leyte, now open for occupants. - Construction of farm to market roads in some barangays on the southern part of the region was on-going. - The LGU in Tabango, Leyte, launched the new goat market and trading center. The said activity aimed to increase awareness on livestock farming through upgraded bred line raised locally. 5. Weather Situation - Scattered moderate to heavy rains occurred during the early part of the reference period but generally warm and sunny weather prevailed throughout the month.
  4. 4. NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS BUILT: Province/Major Industry Division 2002 2003 2004 2005 2007Region VIII 21,103 21,109 20,784 20,777 20,764Agriculture, Hunting & Forestry 96 100 103 90 93Fishery 84 87 87 115 113Mining and Quarrying 2 a a a aManufacturing 3,634 3,635 3,700 3,704 3,703Electricity, Gas and Water 67 67 58 68 68Construction 72 70 68 65 66Wholesale and Retail Trade 11,776 11,781 11,227 11,007 10,999Hotels and Restaurants 1,892 1,892 2,002 2,105 2,106Transport, Storage and Communication 581 592 377 372 367Financial Intermediation 424 425 473 500 490Real Estate, Renting & Business 588 588 726 780 783ServicesEducation 201 205 213 219 224Health and Social Work 382 381 404 434 434Other Community, Social & Personal 1,304 1,286 1,346 1,318 1,318Services
  5. 5. Business Names Registered 1,052 1,969 1,788 (4th Quarter 2010) (3rd Quarter 2010) (2nd Quarter 2010)Total Revenue Collection P865.5 P964.7 P968.0(in Million pesos) (1st Quarter 2011) (4th Quarter 2010) (3rd Quarter 2010)
  6. 6. Implications of the 2008 Annual Survey of Philippine Business and Industry (ASPBI) Findings to the Region 8’s Economy:• Manufacturing Industries ranked first on the Average Revenue per Establishment, also highest in Average Monthly Compensation and ranked third in terms of employment. And so the LGUs in the region are encouraged to support the growth of manufacturing sector.• Hotels and Restaurants Industry: one of the low performing industries in 2008. The data, employment and value added for this sector are considered to be below average.• More infrastructure support was deemed necessary by the local government to increase revenue, since the region is located in Central Visayas which is the tourism belt of the country.• The survey results also showed that Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery Industry is the most labor intensive, least productive and one of the lowest-paying industries in the region.• There is a need to shift the surplus labor in this sector to manufacturing and agri- business
  7. 7. REGION 6CONSTRUCTION(Floor area in square 4th Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtrmeters; value in P1,000) 2010 2010 2009 Total (number) 1,022 1,043 1,104 Total floor area 194,292 184,916 197,128 Value 1,810,769 1,679,816 2,413,555 Residential (number) 789 805 815 Total floor area 100,626 107,934 95,770 Value 806,097 872,403 763,668 Nonresidential (number) 172 168 150 Total floor area 92,102 73,550 97,727 Value 866,175 566,733 1,482,576 Additions (number) 13 16 22 Total floor area 1,564 3,432 3,631 Value 12,252 31,864 22,135 Alterations/repairs (number) 48 54 117 Value 126,244 208,814 145,174
  8. 8. REGION 7CONSTRUCTION(Floor area in square 4th Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtrmeters; value in P1,000) 2010 2010 2009 Total (number) 2,947 2,106 3,663 Total floor area 465,696 338,594 464,705 Value 3,352,705 2,474,053 3,808,877 Residential (number) 2,369 1,628 3,110 Total floor area 267,288 187,717 311,952 Value 1,705,661 1,157,539 2,138,882 Nonresidential (number) 446 365 379 Total floor area 195,372 139,815 137,385 Value 1,487,751 1,183,401 1,505,652 Additions (number) 25 32 32 Total floor area 3,036 11,062 15,368 Value 30,543 77,058 90,527 Alterations/repairs (number) 107 81 142 Value 128,748 56,053 73,814
  9. 9. REGION 8: EASTERN VISAYASCONSTRUCTION(Floor area in square meters; 4th Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtrvalue in P1,000) 2010 2010 2009 Total (number) 471 529 615 Total floor area 74,185 74,888 69,597 Value 580,854 543,024 574,672 Residential (number) 332 337 441 Total floor area 40,686 38,729 45,095 Value 276,309 267,806 322,874 Nonresidential (number) 69 103 94 Total floor area 21,503 22,642 22,238 Value 140,916 147,254 202,880 Additions (number) 13 20 20 Total floor area 11,996 13,517 2,264 Value 106,249 75,587 18,822 Alterations/repairs (number) 57 69 60 Value 57,378 52,375 30,096
  10. 10. Note:• Unlike in Regions 6 and 7 which experienced an increasingrate, the number of non-residential establishments (whichcomprises industrial, commercial, educational, health and otherbuildings) in region 8 had a sharp decline in the 4th quarter of2010.• Also, Region 8 has the lowest number of nonresidentialbuildings in the Visayas region.• Overall, Region has the lowest total number in theconstruction and housing sector in Visayas. This could be relatedto the issue of poverty in the region.
  11. 11. • Increase by 0.7 % (public elementary schools)• Increase by 1.5% (secondary schools)• It is the first increase in five years
  12. 12. • Northern Samar registered the highest increase in elementary level NER whileBiliran recorded the biggest decline of 1.6%.• Samar posted the highest increase in secondary level NER while the only provincethat experienced a decline was Biliran. (0.2%)
  13. 13. • Region 8 has the lowest functional literacy rate in every level in the Visayas region.• Yet in SY 2004-05, Eastern Visayas topped the National Achievement Test (NAT) inall subject areas. Considering that the Eastern Visayas region is relatively poor, theregion’s record of topping the NAT is a promising development for the area.
  14. 14. NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS BY LEVEL OF EDUCATION ANDDIVISIONSY 2005-2006 to SY 2008-2009•Source: Department of Education, Region VIII SY 2005-2006 SY 2006-2007 SY 2007-2008 SY 2008-2009 Division/Level of Education Govt. Private Govt. Private Govt. Private Govt. Private Region VIII Elementary 21,011 541 21,105 458 21,331 584 21,343 677 Secondary 6,139 1,051 6,298 930 6,572 784 6,646 975 • Fluctuating number of teachers in private schools through the years • Private schools have more teachers than government schools • The trend in each region is almost the same with the aggregated data. • On mass media: Most households use radios than TVs.
  15. 15. •Electricity remains as the universal source of energy•More households preferred the use of conventional fuel: there was adecrease in the use of fuelwood and charcoal. This reflected theincrease in the accessibility of supply of petroleum products such asLPG.•Electricity was widely used across all income levels: all incomeclasses except households with less than P 5000 average familyincome. 80% use fuelwood, charcoal and biomass residue.
  16. 16. TEN LEADING CAUSES OF MORTALITY, NUMBER AND RATE, REGION VIII2003-2007 and 2008(Rate per 100,000 population)Source: DOH Center for Health Development - Eastern Visayas 5-Year Average (2003-2007) 2008 Leading Causes Number Rate Number Rate 1. Cardiovascular 5,114 129.84 5,701 143.98 Diseases 2. Pneumonia 3,658 92.88 3,011 76.04 3. Malignant 1,116 28.34 1,157 29.22 neoplasm/cancer 4. Gastrointestinal 496 12.59 972 24.55 Diseases 5. Accidents 886 22.50 901 22.76 6. Tuberculosis, all 1,116 28.34 838 21.16 forms 7. Pulmonary 803 20.39 714 18.03 Diseases 8. Diabetes 439 11.15 561 14.17 Mellitus 9. Septicemia 395 10.03 504 12.73 10. 482 12.24 449 11.34 Kidney Diseases
  17. 17. • Total fertility rate was decreasing.• Infant mortality rate, as well as under-five mortality rateis increasing.• In 2006, there was a large decrease in the maternalmortality rate which could imply that there was animprovement in the healthcare for pregnant women.•The prevalence rate of underweight children decreased,however, this was still below the MDG target. (necessaryto eradicate poverty)
  18. 18. GROWTH RATES AT CONSTANT (1985) PRICESGROSS REGIONAL DOMESTIC PRODUCT2007-2008 and 2008-2009 REGION / YEAR 2007-2008 2008-2009 PHILIPPINES 3.7 1.1 NCR METRO MANILA 4.7 (0.4) CAR CORDILLERA 1.7 2.0 I ILOCOS 2.0 (1.0) II CAGAYAN VALLEY 1.7 1.9 III CENTRAL LUZON 3.7 (1.4) IVA CALABARZON 1.9 (1.6) IVB MIMAROPA 3.0 0.8 V BICOL 4.1 8.2 VI WESTERN VISAYAS 4.3 5.9 VII CENTRAL VISAYAS 3.3 0.8 VIII EASTERN VISAYAS 3.4 1.8 IX ZAMBOANGA PENINSULA 2.0 6.8 X NORTHERN MINDANAO 5.2 2.9 XI DAVAO REGION 3.7 5.4 XII SOCCSKSARGEN 4.5 1.3 ARMM MUSLIM MINDANAO 1.6 2.6 XIII CARAGA 2.7 2.7 There was an economic slow down in 2009. It only posted a 1.8% increase compared to the previous year’s 3.4% growth rate. (due to reversal in growth of the agricultural and fisheries sector)
  19. 19. • Poverty incidence of population increased by 2.4%
  20. 20. GROWTH RATES IN DIFFERENT SECTORS SERVICE SECTOR AFF SECTOR INDUSTRY SECTOR
  21. 21. EMPLOYMENT RATE ESTIMATED April AprilAT 92.8 PERCENT IN APRIL 2011 Philippines 2011 1/ 2010•2.9 million persons were unemployed inApril 2011 (ACROSS EDUCATIONAL Population 15GROUPS, MOST OF THEM ARE HIGH years and over (in 61,778 60,561SCHOOL GRADUATES) 000)• Bulk of the employed persons are in the Labor Forceservices sector (wholesale and retail) Participation Rate 64.2 63.6comprising more than half of the total (%)employed populationSERVICES: 51.7 EmploymentAGRI: 33 Rate (%) 92.8 92.0INDUSTRY: 15.3 Unemployment Rate (%) 7.2 8.0•Employed persons fall into any of thesecategories: wage and salary workers, self-employed without any paid employee,employer in own family-operated farm or Underemployment Rate (%) 19.4 17.8business and worked without pay in ownfamily-operated farm or business.
  22. 22. • Small annual population growth rate relative to its neighboring regions;• But lower population density.
  23. 23. OTHER FACTS:1.Over half of the population were in economically active age group2.Half of the population were below 20 years of age3.Sex ratio recorded at 104 (104 males for every 100 females)4.93% of the population were Roman Catholic5.Nine in every 10 persons were literate6.More male overseas contract workers
  24. 24. • For the past three months, there was no significant change in the CPI, inflationrate and purchasing power of peso.• Its CPI is almost the same with region 6’s.
  25. 25. NET EXPORTS: $46,811 $69,086 $-219433• Large trade deficit was caused by several typhoons which hit theregion but there was a trade surplus for the whole year of 2010. (P13.97 billion)•Majority of the commodities are transported through seaports.
  26. 26. • Leyte Metropolitan Water district(LMWD)• Tongonan Geothermal Power Plant of theNational Power Corporation (NPC) locatedin Leyte•Biliran Electric Cooperative (Bileco)•A mini-hydro electric power plant inHinabian, Catmon, St. Bernard wasdeveloped with capacity of 810 kW toserve the Pacific Towns particularly St.Bernard and San Juan.• A major breakthrough in powergeneration is the Southern LeyteGeothermal Project in San Juan with acapacity of 50 to more than 100 MegaWatts (MW)
  27. 27. • San Juanico Bridge-total length of 2.16 kilometers (1.34 mi)- Connecting Tacloban City on the Leyte sideand Santa Rita town on the Samar side- longest bridge in the Philippines spanning abody of seawater- Construction commenced in 1969 over SanJuanico Strait from Cabalawan, Tacloban Cityto the municipality of Santa Rita, Samar, withcompletion in 1973- The bridge was then named as MarcosBridge after the era that was built upon. Itwas said to have been presented as a Gift and"Testimonial of Love" by the PhilippinePresident Ferdinand Marcos to the firstlady, Imelda, a native of Leyte.
  28. 28. •Eastern Nautical Highway- With 2 out of 4 portsRORO-capable (Naval,Cataingan), and 1 out of 2routes serviced regularly byshipping companies(Cataingan-Naval, Biliran).
  29. 29. • Eastern Visayas Agro-Industrial Growth Center in Tacloban City• Leyte Industrial Development Estate in Isabel, Leyte• Southern Leyte has a total of 12 seaports, 2 of which aredeclared as national ports, the Maasin and Liloan ports and the10 are municipal ports. Of these 10 ports, five are operational,namely, Maasin, Liloan, St. Bernard, San Juan and Sogod.• The province has two existing airports namely, the CalbayogAirport and the Catbalogan Airport.
  30. 30. Waray-Waray:• Located in Samar and Leyte referred topeople who inhabit the islands of Samar,Biliran and the eastern section of Leyte• One of the most religious people in thePhilippines (Roman Catholic)• Speaks Waray-Waray language• Other notable spoken language includeSpanish, Chinese and Japanese• Kuratsa dance is a very popular traditionaldance at many social gatherings especially inweddings• Often stereotyped as “brave warriors” :“basta ang Waray, hindi uurong sa away”• known to be contented people• known for its love for music• Livelihood: Farming and fishing, productionof native wines like tuba
  31. 31. Number of Language/Dialect Percent Households Eastern Visayas 715,070 100.00 Waray 404,548 56.57 Bisaya/Binisaya 150,544 21.05 Cebuano 139,912 19.57 Kankanai/Kankaney/ 3,017 0.42Kankanaey Sama 2,047 0.29(Samal)/Abakon Tagalog 1,508 0.21 Other local 12,713 1.78language/dialect Other foreign 781 0.11language/dialect
  32. 32. LANGUAGES ANDDIALECTS SPOKEN:•WARAY• BINISAYA/BISAYA•CEBUANO(LEYTEHANON)
  33. 33. Pressing Issues
  34. 34. Pressing Issues• High vulnerability to natural disasters• Mining• Supreme Court “flip-flopping” decisions• Public Health• Others – Bad politics – High insurgency
  35. 35. High vulnerability to natural disasters• Infrastructure identified by DPWH as vulnerable when a strong earthquake hits• 31 public school buildings, 22 municipal buildings, 5 rural health centers, 1 barangay hall, 3 gymnasiums, 1 district hospital, 2 commercial buildings• The structures are either dilapidated or have shown hairline cracks on floors, walls, or ceilings, which are signs of possible collapse.• Majority were constructed in the 1950s.• Flooding caused by typhoons.• Disaster and risk reduction to be taught in public high schools, colleges
  36. 36. Mining• Government and Private sector have shown keen interest in developing the industry.• CBCP criticized local leaders accusing them of acting “more as agents of the mining firms rather than agents of the people.”• Irreversible impact in the islands of Manicani and Homonhon (Eastern Samar), and Batag (Northern Samar).
  37. 37. Supreme Court “flip-flopping” decisions on cityhood of 16 municipalities• 16 municipalities: – Baybay, Leyte – Bogo, Cebu – Catbalogan, Samar – – Tandag, Surigao del Sur Lamitan, Basilan 3 FROM REGION – – Borongan, Eastern Samar Tayabas, Quezon VIII! – Tabuk, Kalinga – Bayugan, Agusan del Sur – Batac, Ilocos Norte – Mati, Davao Oriental – Guihulngan, Negros Oriental – Cabadbaran, Agusan del Norte – El Salvador, Misamis Oriental – Carcar, Cebu – Naga, Cebu
  38. 38. Anyare?• 2007 - cityhood bills lapsed into laws without the President’s signature• 2008 - SC declared cityhood bills UNCONSTITUTIONAL• 2009 - SC reversed 2008 ruling, so CONSTITUTIONAL once again• 2010 - SC reversed 2009 decision and reinstated 2008 decision; UNCONSTITUTIONAL• 2011 - SC again reversed its decision; CONSTITUTIONAL
  39. 39. So, ano ngayon?• Cities receive more funds (IRA) from the national government than municipalities.• Because of the yearly flip-flop, the LGUs could possibly have problems with budgeting. Province IRA (2007) IRA (2008) Baybay, Leyte P92,491,786 P307,442,636 Catbalogan, P77,866,980 P245,551,739 Samar Borongan, P69,216,392 P255,163,039 Eastern Samar Source: Bureau of Local Government Finance
  40. 40. Requirements for cityhoodRequirement Before AfterIncome* min. P20M min. P100MLand Area** min. 100km2 min. 100km2Population** min. 150,000 min. 150,000satisfying* is mandatory, and either one of ** can be satisfied Baybay, Catbalogan, and Borongan do not satisfy the minimum income and population requirement. They only satisfy the minimum land area requirement. (based on the 2007 data)
  41. 41. Public Health• Schistosomiasis (parasitic disease, chronic illness, can damage internal organs, in children: impair growth and cognitive development) endemic to region.• High poverty index and malnutrition particularly north and western Samar.

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