Uncovering DHS data for livestock research

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Seminar given at ILRI, International Livestock Institute

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Uncovering DHS data for livestock research

  1. 1. Uncovering DHS Data for Livestock Research Catherine Pfeifer, Stephen Oloo Nairobi 3rd February 2017
  2. 2. Content 2 Background • DHS data description • Spatial DHS units • Survey types • Standard DHS survey DHS use in livestock • Agricultural population mapping • Poor livestock keeper mapping • Gender context maps for value chain • Understanding linkage between livestock ownership and animal sourced food Potential future research • Creating absolute poverty maps • Investigate linkage between livestock ownership and nutrition • Conclusion
  3. 3. Content 3 DHS data • Background • Spatial DHS units • Survey types • Standard DHS survey DHS use in livestock • Agricultural population mapping • Poor livestock keeper mapping • Gender context maps for value chain • Understanding linkage between livestock ownership and animal sourced food Potential future research • Creating absolute poverty maps • Investigate linkage between livestock ownership and nutrition • Conclusion
  4. 4. DHS data : Background • DHS program was established in 1984 by the USAID • Carries out nationally representative demographic and health surveys • Objectives  Support decision making  Improve coordination and partnerships in data collection  Develop capacity  Improve tools and methods for data collection and analysis  Improve the dissemination and utilization of data • Main funding for the surveys come from the USAID • More than 300 nationally representative surveys have been carried out in about 90 countries 4
  5. 5. DHS data : Spatiality of DHS data 5 DHS units : Admin units at which the survey is representative Cluster coordinates : Cluster is a group of 20-40 households Centroid of the household location is shifted (2km in urban, 5km in rural area)
  6. 6. DHS data : Survey Types • The types of data collected varies by survey type and level (individual/household) survey • Survey types: • Service Provision Assessment (SPA) • HIV/AIDS Indicator Survey (AIS) • Malaria Indicator Survey (MIS) • Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) (Standard DHS Surveys & Interim DHS Surveys) • DHS is not open data, needs to be requested for specific projects and under reporting conditions. 6
  7. 7. DHS data : Structure of the Standard Survey 7 Standard DHS Women survey Men survey Household survey Children survey • Basic data • Health and breastfeeding • Child’s health • Partner’s characteristics • Domestic violence HH Characteristics (Assets and wealth index) Sampling : Over-sampling/ Under-sampling=> correction factors are provided Sampling is representative at “DHS unit” level (often admin unit)
  8. 8. DHS data : Standard DHS data we work with
  9. 9. Content 9 Background • DHS data description • Spatial DHS units • Survey types • Standard DHS survey DHS use in livestock • Agricultural population mapping • Poor livestock keeper mapping • Gender context maps for value chain • Understanding linkage between livestock ownership and animal sourced food Potential future research • Creating absolute poverty maps • Investigate linkage between livestock ownership and nutrition • Conclusion
  10. 10. • Suppress the rural-urban divide • Extract cluster level data – Livestock ownership (cattle, sheep, goat, chicken, pigs) – Reporting depending on agriculture • Currently testing mapping methods and correlation 10 Illustration : Agricultural population mapping
  11. 11. • Wealth index – Relative poverty measurement – Classifying HH in quintiles based on consumer items 11 Poorest = poorest 20% Poorer = poorest 40% From the sample Illustration : Poor livestock keeper mapping
  12. 12. • Targeting : will only include gender if we can map gender context • Combining DHS data from women survey with OECD • Used DHS variables : education, power, asset ownership, access to news • Factor analysis : 1. High education 2. High family labor 3. Legal discrimination from finance and public space 4. Land ownership alone (at hh level) 5. Legal discrimination for land and non-land assets 12 Illustration : Gender context maps for value chain
  13. 13. 13 IMPACT GE model : ASF demand and consumption => national average What does it mean for the poor livestock keeper? • Do poor people keep more or less livestock? Data : wealth index and livestock ownership Illustration : linkage between poverty and livestock ownership
  14. 14. 14 Data used : wealth index, livestock ownership, 24h recall for children between 1-5 years old What does it mean for the poor livestock keeper? • Do poor livestock keeper consume more ASF? Illustration : linkage between livestock ownership and animal sourced food
  15. 15. Content 15 Background • DHS data description • Spatial DHS units • Survey types • Standard DHS survey DHS use in livestock • Agricultural population mapping • Poor livestock keeper mapping • Gender context maps for value chain • Understanding linkage between livestock ownership and animal sourced food Potential future research • Creating absolute poverty maps • Investigate linkage between livestock ownership and nutrition • Conclusion
  16. 16. • Absolute poverty maps – Linking to WDI poverty indicators (1.9$, 3.1$ poverty line) • Improved understanding of the linkages between livestock ownership and nutrition – Role of markets (degree of urbanity) – Linkages with other food items than ASF • Assessing the linkage between herd size and composition and wealth All is a spatio-temporal context 16 Potential Future Research
  17. 17. • DHS is a health survey with livestock information, no crops • Wealth measure is based on consumption and is relative – Lots of consumer items are available • There is children and mothers nutrition data • It is spatially explicit and can be mapped 17 Conclusion
  18. 18. DHS gives us new insights on the role of livestock for the poor based on more than a million observation points across the developing world c.pfeifer@cgiar.org, s.oloo@cgiar.org 18

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